The Instigator
somerandomvideocreator
Pro (for)
The Contender
lionard_dubson
Con (against)

0.99999999999... does not equal 1.

Do you like this debate?NoYes+1
Add this debate to Google Add this debate to Delicious Add this debate to FaceBook Add this debate to Digg  
Debate Round Forfeited
lionard_dubson has forfeited round #5.
Our system has not yet updated this debate. Please check back in a few minutes for more options.
Time Remaining
00days00hours00minutes00seconds
Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 12/10/2017 Category: Miscellaneous
Updated: 1 month ago Status: Debating Period
Viewed: 134 times Debate No: 105698
Debate Rounds (5)
Comments (2)
Votes (0)

 

somerandomvideocreator

Pro

Surreal numbers list 1 and 1 - 1/infinity as different.
lionard_dubson

Con

0.999999..x10=9.99999...
9.999999...-0.99999...=0.99999...x9
9.999999...-0.99999...=9
0.99999...x9=9
0.99999...x9/9=9/9
0.99999...=1
Debate Round No. 1
somerandomvideocreator

Pro

https://www.youtube.com...

Really good explanation as why 0.9999... does not equal 1, at least, in the surreal numbers.
lionard_dubson

Con

well you wasted a round, the last line of my proof is literelly: 0.99999...=1

unless you can point out a flaw in my proof, it seems i already won
Debate Round No. 2
somerandomvideocreator

Pro

0.999... and 1 are certainly infinitely close, but is that really good enough?

0.999... is really 1 - 1 / infinity.

0.999... * 10 = 10 - 10 / infinity.
9.999... - 0.999... = 0.999... * 9
(10 - 10 / infinity) - (1 - 1 / infinity) = 0.999... * 9
0.999... * 9 = 9 - 9 / infinity
0.999... = 1 - 1 / infinity = 1.

This works in the surreal numbers, because, as the video says, 1 does not equal 1 - 1/infinity.

Take the function 1 - (0.1)^x. At x = 1, you get 0.9. At x = 2, you get 0.99, and so on and so on. The question is: What is the value at infinity? Can you really say that 1 and 0.999... are equal?
lionard_dubson

Con

yes, you can say they are equal

infinity is NOT A NUMBER therefore 1/infinity is also not a number, its so small that its practically zero... its whats called: "reaching for zero"

the same way we say that 0.33333...=1/3 we say that 0.99999...=1

take for example the following problem: x=1/2+x/2=1/2+1/4+1/8+1/16...=1

however its also true that: 1/2+1/4+1/8+1/16...=(infinity-1) / infinity=0.99999...

therefore it is beyond a shadow of a doubt true that 0.99999...=1
Debate Round No. 3
somerandomvideocreator

Pro

Look at the video I had about the surreal numbers. The surreal numbers list 1 - 1/infinity as clearly a number distinct from 1.
lionard_dubson

Con

you have 2 problems with your argument:

1. it is only meant to work in the surreal numbers set in the first place

2. its still wrong based on my last proof, you have clearly ignored me

i think this is a safe win at this point, unless you actually come up with a counterargument and stop repeating the same thing over and over again...

G G
Debate Round No. 4
somerandomvideocreator

Pro

The deeper question is what does "equals" mean. As an example, take a derivative: dy/dx. dy and dx are both infinitesimals. The question is, does an infinitesimal equal 0. If it does, then calculus collapses because that is what it is entirely based off of. If, however, an infinitesimal does not equal 0, then 0.999... (which can be written as 1 - dx, where dx is some infinitesimal) is not the same as 1 because dx does not equal 0.
This round has not been posted yet.
Debate Round No. 5
2 comments have been posted on this debate. Showing 1 through 2 records.
Posted by WarTurtle10101 1 month ago
WarTurtle10101
lol to many .999999999 I am lost.
Posted by BryanMullinsNOCHRISTMAS2 1 month ago
BryanMullinsNOCHRISTMAS2
What?
This debate has 0 more rounds before the voting begins. If you want to receive email updates for this debate, click the Add to My Favorites link at the top of the page.