The Instigator
MattAllen
Pro (for)
Tied
0 Points
The Contender
Guidestone
Con (against)
Tied
0 Points

$10.10 Minimum Wage is Good

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Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 6/5/2014 Category: Politics
Updated: 3 years ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 1,005 times Debate No: 56103
Debate Rounds (3)
Comments (2)
Votes (0)

 

MattAllen

Pro

I can't believe the stupidity of Republicans in Congress when it comes to the issue of minimum wage. Republicans continue to vote down votes for a $10.10 minimum wage while about 75% of Americans support raising the minimum wage. If more than three-quarters of the country wants something to happen, just compromise for once. Stop complaining about Obama and actually work on fixing and solving America's actual problems!
Guidestone

Con

I thank my opponent for proposing this interesting debate. I hope we both can come to an understanding of each others viewpoint.

Firstly, I will address the unsourced poll. This is a logical fallacy called Bandwagon which is "You appealed to popularity or the fact that many people do something as an attempted form of validation.The flaw in this argument is that the popularity of an idea has absolutely no bearing on its validity.[1]"

I will now explain why a $10.10 Minimum Wage is not good.

1. Inflation

Any increase in the minimum wage will increase prices. "Price of relevant inputs - if the cost of resources used to produce a good increase, sellers will be less inclined to supply the same quantity at a given price, and the supply curve will shift to the left. [2]" Minimum wage increases the cost of labor. This increase will cause the supply to contract and have fewer products at a higher price.

2. Cost of Living

The cost of living varies from city to city, so a one size fits all will not work. For example, "A salary of $50,000 in Toledo, Ohio should increase to $103,114 in New York, New York [3]" Obviously, if these two cities would have a minimum wage it should not be the same. If you set the minimum wage higher than the market value of labor it will cause inflation in those cities, and it could be too low in other cities. In the end, nothing got better.

3. Unemployment

If the price is above the market price this will make quantity supplied of labor greater than the quantity demanded, aka Unemployment. First, when minimum wage increases, businesses fire existing employees. Second, now being able to earn more, more people look for jobs. This cause increases in unemployment.

4. Outsourcing

If it becomes cheaper to produce the product outside the country than inside those jobs would be moved to the other country. This raises unemployment even more; however, prices won't rise as mucha if any, but less people have jobs to earn money to buy the products.



Sources
[1] https://yourlogicalfallacyis.com...
[2] http://www.netmba.com...
[3] http://www.bestplaces.net...


Debate Round No. 1
MattAllen

Pro

Thank you for accepting this debate, which I am positive will be an interesting way to learn new views on the fascinating issue of minimum wage.

First, by July of 2016 (at the current rate we are going) the number of people affected by whether or not the minimum wage will be about 27.8 million people.

Second, it is very to difficult for people to not get stuck in minimum wage jobs for their entire lives, especially in our current, tough economy.

Third, researchers believe that increasing the minimum wage doesn't kill jobs at all, but actually would give the economy a boost by channeling more pay to low income workers who are likely to spend it.

Forth, the current minimum wage of $7.25 is not enough to get workers and their families out of poverty. The minimum wage even falls short of the poverty line for a family of two people ($16,000 annually) none the less families of three ($19,000 annually) and families of four ($24,000 annually).
Guidestone

Con

I thank my opponent for his response.

It is important to show who is actually in minimum wage jobs. According to a Pew research they are "Disproportionately young: 50.6% are ages 16 to 24; 24% are teenagers (ages 16 to 19) [1]". These are generally not the people raising families. Second, this shows that people move above the minimum wage as they get more experience showing that people don't get stuck there that much.

My opponent also claims the current federal minimum wage is not enough to et out of poverty. $7.25 minimum wage * 40 work week * 52 weeks in a year = $15,080 for one person. The poverty line held by almost all states for one person is $11,670 [2]. This is above the poverty line, and you can't even factor in taxes since someone of that low of income won't even pay income tax. Also, it is important to note a lot of states have it higher than the federal minimum wage already [3].

I would also like to know the source of my opponent's third point.



Sources
[1] http://www.pewresearch.org...
[2] http://aspe.hhs.gov...
[3] http://www.dol.gov...


Debate Round No. 2
MattAllen

Pro

The other 49.4%, according to your previous argument, would be workers who do support families. This would mean that increasing the minimum wage would be necessary for 1/2 of all the people it affects.
I would like to know the source of the specific fact about how, in most states the poverty line is $11,670, because on my sources it said about $16,000. My sources are: Wikipedia, White House, Washington Post, and CNN. These sources all tell me that, on average of all 50 states, the poverty line is about $16,000 (give or take $500) for a family of two.
According to the Department of Labor website, Idaho, Utah, Wyoming, Hawaii, N. Dakota, S. Dakota, Nebraska, Kansas, Oklahoma, Texas, Minnesota, Iowa, Arkansas, Louisiana, Wisconsin, Indiana, Kentucky, Tennessee, Mississippi, Alabama, New Hampshire, Pennsylvania, Maryland, West Virginia, Virginia, N. Carolina, S. Carolina, Georgia, Guam, Virgin Islands, and Puerto Rico all either have minimum wages below or the same as the federal minimum wage or don't have minimum wage laws at all. (This stat is from January 1st, 2014, but still 31 states/territories is a lot)
The source of my third point is from www.huffingtonpost.com.
Guidestone

Con

I thank my opponent for his responses.

Firstly, just because I didn't say who was the other 49.4% doesn't mean they are workers supporting families this is an unsourced incorrect assumption.

Second, My opponent would like to know where I got my poverty line number from. As sourced in the previous round I got it from the Department of Health and Human Services [1].

Third, I would like to note that 28 states have their minimum wage at or below, unlike the 31 my opponent claimed [2]. This means 22 states have raised their minimum wage. This is a better place for the minimum wage to be decided as pointed out in my opening arguments, which were never addressed, state will have different cost of living in which case each state should adjust their minimum wage accordingly.

Concluding, my opponent has not shown a defensible reason to raise the minimum wage to $10.10 and did not refute any of the counter arguments given.

Sources
[1] http://aspe.hhs.gov...
[2] http://www.dol.gov...


Debate Round No. 3
2 comments have been posted on this debate. Showing 1 through 2 records.
Posted by cwt002 3 years ago
cwt002
I would use this http://www.npc.umich.edu...

This is the National Poverty Center and took the information from the census.
Posted by cwt002 3 years ago
cwt002
Con is definitely providing a significant amount of evidence and in my viewpoint is currently winning.
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