The Instigator
cloebowie
Con (against)
The Contender
Forever23
Pro (for)

A Honey Addiction is Still an Addiction

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Debate Round Forfeited
Forever23 has forfeited round #3.
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Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 11/26/2016 Category: Society
Updated: 4 days ago Status: Debating Period
Viewed: 127 times Debate No: 97373
Debate Rounds (3)
Comments (2)
Votes (0)

 

cloebowie

Con

This debate is whether Winnie the Pooh's addiction to honey is safe for children or not. I can tell you why it isn't, and you can tell me why it is.

Pooh Bear's need for honey portrays that it's okay (and even cute) to feel like you need something you don't actually need.

Honey is on the forefront of Pooh Bear's mind. Honey is a priority for Pooh Bear, regardless of it not being a necessity. If Pooh Bear doesn't have any honey, he is disoriented until he gets it. The bear is reliant on honey to feed his physical and emotional needs, despite not actually needing it. [1]

It doesn't matter what the addiction is; an addiction in itself is dangerous. [2] Even an addiction to a well-balanced breakfast every morning can be dangerous, if, say, your doctor were to prescribe something for you to digest on an empty stomach. [3] One has to know how to function without said temptation(s), and if one does not, then one is always at risk of dysfunction and even destruction.

Resource(s):
[1] https://m.youtube.com...
[2] https://www.psychologytoday.com...
[3] http://www.nhs.uk...

Make the best debater win.
Forever23

Pro

Thanks for creating this debate :)

So let me begin by just asking Con a question. You titled the debate topic " A Honey Addiction is still an addiction" but in your speech, you said that "This debate is whether Winnie the Poohs addiction to honey is safe for children or not".

So since you talked about the latter in your speech, I guess Ill be pro on the latter and say why the addiction is safe.

Initially, I want to establish the fact that Winnie the Pooh is not addicted to honey. There is a very thin line between an addiction and something that you just enjoy. With that in mind, I will define the term addiction as the condition of being dependent of a substance. In this case, just like any bear, Winnie the Pooh simply enjoys eating honey. He CAN live without it, both physically and mentally. Throughout the movie, when having honey taken away from him, the bear does not show any signs of addictive disorder.

Furthermore, addictions are usually triggered if a person has addictive personality disorder. People with this disorder also have impulse control problem, compulsion disorder and Winnie the Pooh has never demonstrated such behavior. Also, a person with these issues often switches addiction and has many at the same time. Throughout the many episodes and movies, the bear has only shown interest in honey rather than dependency. Moreover, people with this disability show social alienation and tolerance for deviance. The bear in the movie has shown none of that since he has many friends to whom he is very kind[1] https://en.wikipedia.org...

With that said, there is no way that Winnie the Pooh could have a negative influence on children. Not only does her have an outstanding personality, he also shows kids that they can like something without being addicted to it.

Thank you
Debate Round No. 1
cloebowie

Con

Thank you so much for engaging in my first debate with me. I couldn't ask for a better opponent than you have presented yourself to be.

I apologize for mismatching my title and my position, but fortunately, you're quick, and it didn't slow the procedure down.

If I may take this moment to address that neither the film nor television series has examined Pooh Bear's fixation on honey thoroughly enough to provide us with just how extreme it is or is not, and therefore, any theory is only an assumption with no way of confirming itself.

However, if signs of an addiction disorder is what Pro is going by, I have already provided my argument with visual evidence of Pooh Bear hallucinating honey in the first round, which is a common symptom addicts experience when deprived of said thing they're addicted to.

The visual evidence shows Pooh Bear asking Rabbit if they can stop (on their way to rescue Christopher Robin) for lunch, which would indicate honey, only to have Rabbit tell him no and that he should be thinking about Christopher Robin instead, but Pooh Bear, however, continues to think about honey impulsively, seeing it everywhere he looks and morphing the word in every sound he hears.

If you're on your way to save your friend's dear life, and you want to make a stop to indulge in your temptation, it is not a temptation at that point but is an addiction that one should seek immediate attention for.

Pro defines being addicted to something as being unable to live without said thing addicted to and that Pooh Bear being able to live without honey means he's not addicted to it, but if an alcoholic can survive without alcohol, then Pooh Bear can live without honey and still be addicted to it nonetheless.

I don't think Pooh Bear's desire for honey is safe for children, considering it portrays itself as an addiction without the bad name, making it something of a devil in disguise.

As much as I'd like to agree that what I interpret as an addiction for honey is nothing more than an admiration for the sweet topping, I still can't bring myself to.
Forever23

Pro

Con: However, if signs of an addiction disorder is what Pro is going by, I have already provided my argument with visual evidence of Pooh Bear hallucinating honey in the first round, which is a common symptom addicts experience when deprived of said thing they're addicted to.

Pro:Pooh bear is never deprived of honey in this episode so therefore, he is just dreaming about something he likes. Having a dream about something doesnt make you obsessed. If a person dreams of money, is he addicted to cash? No. So dreaming does not necessarily scream addiction.

Con: The visual evidence shows Pooh Bear asking Rabbit if they can stop (on their way to rescue Christopher Robin) for lunch, which would indicate honey, only to have Rabbit tell him no and that he should be thinking about Christopher Robin instead, but Pooh Bear, however, continues to think about honey impulsively, seeing it everywhere he looks and morphing the word in every sound he hears.

If you're on your way to save your friend's dear life, and you want to make a stop to indulge in your temptation, it is not a temptation at that point but is an addiction that one should seek immediate attention for.

Pro: Stopping for lunch does not insinuate honey. who knows? Maybe Pooh Bear wanted a fruit? Or some other food? How do you know he wanted honey? Its just an inference. You cant very well save your best friend if youre hungry.

Next of all, there lies the question of if its safe for children. Children see how strange Pooh Bear becomes after eating or thinking about honey. So from the show, they learn that addiction isnt good and that substance should be taken in moderation.

<3
Debate Round No. 2
cloebowie

Con

I feel my opponent is contradicting herself in saying that Pooh Bear sets a good example for children whether he portrays himself as having a honey addiction or not. Such contradiction may imply that she will defend Pooh Bear no matter what, which is discouraging for me to come to terms with. Because she refuses to see anything but the good in Pooh Bear, I can no longer argue with her, but I will continue to argue for you voters.

Although a poor portrayal of an addiction could serve as an example of why one should consider moderation and avoid addiction, Pooh Bear's addiction, however, is not portrayed as harmful but harmless, because, as close as it has come to harming him, it never actually has.

In the visual evidence I shared of Pooh Bear, in round one, he is seen eating what he thought to be honey, only to snap out of his hallucination and realize it's not. Now, it could've been anything. It could've been poison. Lucky for him, it was only mud. Pooh Bear has gotten lucky, on several occasions, in regards to him and his addiction, leaving children under the impression that you get lucky in life. Luck is something Pooh Bear can rely on, because he's a fictional character, and in fiction, it's only mud, but in life, when you wander off into the wilderness, and you mistaken something for your favorite treat, sometimes, it's not mud.

In his request to stop for lunch, even Rabbit accused him of referring to honey. If the accusation wasn't true, then Pooh Bear would've denied it, but instead, he lowered his head in shame, because the bear knew he was guilty. His dearest friend, Christopher Robin, was in danger, and on his trail to rescue him, he wanted to stop, and not to feed his taste buds, because taste buds are secondary, but to feed his addiction, because an addiction is first.

That's my final piece.

I would like to thank my opponent for her fruitful intelligence and lighthearted spirit. She can make as many excuses for Pooh Bear as she wants, but Pooh Bear shall not be excused.

Good luck to my opponent, and make the best debater win.
This round has not been posted yet.
Debate Round No. 3
2 comments have been posted on this debate. Showing 1 through 2 records.
Posted by cloebowie 58 minutes ago
cloebowie
Oh well, it was still a great debate.
Posted by Forever23 19 hours ago
Forever23
sorry i forfeited. was busy over the weekend.
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