The Instigator
Man-is-good
Pro (for)
Winning
18 Points
The Contender
Minuteman
Con (against)
Losing
8 Points

A Poetry Contest

Do you like this debate?NoYes+5
Add this debate to Google Add this debate to Delicious Add this debate to FaceBook Add this debate to Digg  
Post Voting Period
The voting period for this debate has ended.
after 7 votes the winner is...
Man-is-good
Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 6/29/2011 Category: Miscellaneous
Updated: 6 years ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 2,636 times Debate No: 17324
Debate Rounds (4)
Comments (8)
Votes (7)

 

Man-is-good

Pro

Hello, this is debate that I have created for the purpose of promoting the arts (in this case, literature). I encourage my opponent to think of this as a friendly contest in the art of writing poetry. I also encourage him/her to refrain from using any negative/ad hominem remarks in the course of this debate. Otherwise, the voters should give me all seven points for neglecting to follow or adhere to these rules.

Here is an outline for the debate:
First round is only for acceptance. If you present a poem in this round, again, all seven points will be forfeited to me because you have clearly failed to read what I wrote.

Second round: both sides will present a sonnet (a fixed verse of Italian origin consisting of fourteen lines that are typically five-foot iambics rhyming according to a prescribed scheme.) For the sake of creativity, the sonnet does not need to have a repetitive pattern of stress and unstressed or has a fixed rhyme scheme. The sonnet is about their favorite flower, and what it means to them. For example, one can write a sonnet about the rose, and write about its symbolic role for love.

Third round: both sides will present three poems [they can present a narrative] in terza rima. Again, syllables and patterns of stress are not needed for the poems. Each line may have 10-12 syllables.

Fourth Round: Monologue in blank verse (ten syllables each)
The monologue may be written as a speaker who seeks to contemplate, or someone who is addressing himself, questioning himself, and so on.
For example, a man could address the question of 'What is life' in his monologue.

The monologue might be written from an already-existing character. (i.e. Prince Hamlet)

All personal and subjective tastes are welcome when judging the poems.
Minuteman

Con

This is my first debate her, and I accept. I hope for a good one :)
Debate Round No. 1
Man-is-good

Pro

The Lily-A Sonnet

O happy lily, in its bed of clovers green,

Gently rowed, across the silt, by receding tides,

While, round its brim, an aura of gold can be seen;

Pure ring of pink, visible among the white buds,

Weathered not by the cold hands of winter and snow,

It is the child of darkness, pure and untainted:

Where the circles of cliffs are around the coldest hill,

And, the weeping willow whispers her lullaby,

Are the sleeping men, in the comfort of their crypt;

Crossing the furrowed hills, covered in pristine snow,

Watching the gigantic ocean with empty eyes,

That fades into the bed of the blue hour;

For they rest, in the billows that rise and grow,

A lily soft and white, must lie upon their brow.

Minuteman

Con

A Hmyn To The Rose, in Full Sonnet

The rose, most beautful of flowers,
Unpredictable in sting and thorn;
Not to underestimate its power,
A rose, the sign of a glorious morn;
It's beauty, red or pink or green or blue,
A thing of fables, certainly
Made simply to touch the heart of you
The beauty of its shine, eternally;
Shining through the light of a spring day,
A sign of the days to come;
Remain beautiful, forever it may,
The flower of solemness, beauty and fun.
Do not deny the greatness of rose;
The best sensation to the nose.

Debate Round No. 2
Man-is-good

Pro


A Father's Advice to His Son
My dear son, even while the coin of gold your pocket embrace,
Remember the rough fields of maize, where the crow
Once sat, near the scarecrow's scaffold, with such grace,

Remember as you sail abroad the expanse of the sea,
Your mother and I, who raised you, in this little house,
Near the old hills and the withered, autumn tree,

Remember how you slept so humbly, without the fairest rune of gold,
To hear the crow's call, or the cow's sporadic moot,
Or in the comfort of your bed, and its thin, but warm, folds,

Not even the richest jewel, mined from the ore of stone
Can surpass the warmth of your old home, the tall ears of corn,
Or the days of summer, far worthier than a king's scepter or throne;

All the joy, the nostalgia that your own childhood home
Is far fairer than the ring of silver, that which old years cannot atone.

La Speranza
From Mercy's, Pity's, and Compassion's, cmae
The gentle breeze who, with soft, pearl hands, soothes the tides
That washes his ripples back to the sea selfsame,

From Mercy's, Pity's, and Compassion's, came through
The walking mist, a spirit, amidst the solitary mountains and tall,
Leaving rings of iron gray in the farmer's little shoe,

From Mercy's, Pity's, and Compassion's, came
The guiding muse, who, within the cavern's mouth, lits
Upon the candles brim, a doughty flame,

From Mercy's, Pity's, and Compassion's, came
The river that strews between the rocks, with rings of gold,
And waters tranquil, within the terrain's frame,

For once there walks, with unfettered feet, a tempest,
She, the daughter of mercy, gives us unending rest.

A Horse and Its Rider
I see a horse, reined to a solitary ledge, near the sea,
That parts the trail of mountain cliffs and vale,
And, with force, imbues life to the white, and lonely, trees,

Silent as the ripple under archways, or the billow
Where reflections are refracted across the white tide,
Like a ring of flowers near the mournful willow;

Its rider, tall and with the pallor of an ivory ring,
Round the fairy, who leads, withn the stretches of grass,
Pale kings, to the hills, where no birds sing;

With his chalice of silver, he sings, in a voice clear,
So that even the owl, in the solitude of his burrow, wakes,
The echo through the bed of shrubs, he hears;

Two deities strange who rise, from the flowers of darkness,
And burgeon, with fruits the hue of man's miserable solace.


Minuteman

Con

The Wanderer

The wanderer, a story one must ask,
The one who traveled to the landfar away;
No one now knows where he lives, nor where he basks.

Though many legends hath arised,
And fables surely to be told,
None mayknow howhis journey was comprised.

Perhapshis journey was a million leagues,
Or perhaps a voyage to the other side,
Mortal man ne'er concerned with suchthings;

His voyage never to be known,
Hisstorynever to be shown.

The Creator

As he watches over earth with mighty eyes,
the world he knows more than any man;
He watches as the humans cheat and lie.

Perhaps a god, perhaps the greatest man;
Perhaps an alien, or could he be a beast?
Lord of Earth, each army and each clan.

What is time, and what is space?
Only a blink of an eye, a small dent of light
The cosmos run at his chosen pace;

The god to end all life,
The god to end all strife.

The Recitations of a Voyager

I sailed out from far inland,
Expecting epic voyages, and I recieved,
On a ship with two hundred manned.

The creatures were like nothing here,
The plants they bloomed with life and death,
I nay knew to feel joy or fear;

The new world expanded to the end of the earth,
It was like pure happiness as I explored its land,
I see it as a second birth;

I will travel to the end of the night,
For now I have seen the world's light.
Debate Round No. 3
Man-is-good

Pro

Marguerite’s Song to the Nightingale

The character of Marguerite comes from the story of Goethe's Faust. She is a poor village girl who is infatuated with a good doctor by the name of Dr. Faust, who, after consulting the Earth Spirit, has invoked the devil for eternal youth. In a duel with her brother, Valentin, Valentin is killed when Mestophiles manages to parry his blow to her brother. [1]

In this imaginary scene, Marguerite is in her gardern, with a nightengale perched upon a branch in a cypress tree.Marguerite notices the nightengale and speaks to it, telling it not to sing and explaining to it, incoherently, about her loss. She suddenly hears a voice that tells her not to mourn, apparently a sign from heaven. Marguerite then looks to the heavens and prays, happy and hopeful now that she knows she will not die because of her sins.

I suggest my opponent to write a brief review of the story before his scene/monologue, unless if he is creating his own character to speak and convey through. I would, also, like to thank my oppnent for participating in this lively contest. Let us hope he has the same feelings about this poetry contest as I do.

Dear, dear nightingale, hiding in the oak’s coronet
Of firs--, minstrel of the forest green,
Sing not: thy voice haunts the pale hills and glen,
And makes the cowering rose pale with fear,
Its pink bud with the hue of drear stones.

Dear bird, how much hope is now in my heart,
That in the sea that, at which the blue hour
In the hand of the awakening day,
Thy carol resounds through the silent waves,
To he, who of my kin, and the same blood,
Fell beneath the boatman’s row, or the wood plank,

You who sit by the little white flowers
Floating across the pristine face of the water,
O nightingale, do you not hear those voices,
Deep between the hanging foliage and thick leaves,
In whispers, soft as the sound of rushing waters:

You whom the daffodil fears, can you not see—
The spirit who whispers to my ear,
Making lily hands part the waters clear,
And the silver bell toll its melody?
For, though, I discern not, among the drifting reeds,:

‘Gretchen, my dear, how innocent you are,
Deep in prayer, facing the unperturbed sky,
Saluting the band of migrating geese, white,
As a child, lying in the open field,
With all of nature awakening, before you,
To the wild fervor of love

Wash thy tears, for the cypress’ crown and thorn
Will not felt thee, nor will the great sea
Douse you in his waves"

[Marguerite looks to the heavens and puts her hands in prayer.]

Just deity, you who have cleansed me of my sin,
The peaceful dale I transverse, the hour
Appointed now in your merciful hand.

[Scene ends. Marguerite exits the garden to enter the church.]

Works cited:
[1] http://en.wikipedia.org...

Minuteman

Con

I would like to think MIG for creating this debate, a great way to express ourselves through poetry.

The Question

I myself wondered for many decades, And now I have such little time to speak
Why live, if death is what will come to us?
Is there a devil? A God? Or nothing?
Was the truth the truth of final darkness?

What is to live? To exist and then die?
What awaits us all? A void? Other sides?
A second birth, a second death, empty rooms?
The soul's circle, from skin to soul again.

So many great minds and philosophers;
Ponder the question of the next world
Or perhaps there is none? A death fore'er
No true answer to the final question,

Perhaps I fail, to see some great truth?
Perhaps I fail, to see the divine?
Perhaps I fail, to be so foolish
Perhaps I missed the meaning of it all?

Debate Round No. 4
8 comments have been posted on this debate. Showing 1 through 8 records.
Posted by Man-is-good 6 years ago
Man-is-good
SuperRobotWars, Rockylightening, and Wierdman, I suggest you all to neutralize your vote. And yes I do know, wjmelements.
Posted by wjmelements 6 years ago
wjmelements
You know, when 2 people "counter votebomb," they are also votebombing.
Posted by Man-is-good 6 years ago
Man-is-good
Actually Ogan, I did suggest that my opponent and I to not to strictly adhere the syllable count or metre, and so on. But, thank you for the comment.
Posted by Ogan 6 years ago
Ogan
Why the straitjacket of structured form? I don't really mean sonnet etc, but syllables and such like. By concentrating the mind upon counting, one may miss all that heavenly glory. I like the poetry nevertheless and look forward to more.
Posted by Man-is-good 6 years ago
Man-is-good
For example (is four syllables:

FOR EX AM PLE [each one syllable]

So a line of ten syllables can be:

FOR EX AM PLE, THERE ARE TWO WAYS HOW TO [each one syllable]
Note: if you are confused, you might bend the rules, but please do incorporate a ten-syllable basis.
Posted by Minuteman 6 years ago
Minuteman
What do you mean by "ten sylables each?"
Posted by Minuteman 6 years ago
Minuteman
I'm going to be writing mine a little at a time over the next day or two.
Posted by Man-is-good 6 years ago
Man-is-good
Oh, dang! I meant writing poetry, not presenting it.
7 votes have been placed for this debate. Showing 1 through 7 records.
Vote Placed by Rockylightning 6 years ago
Rockylightning
Man-is-goodMinutemanTied
Agreed with before the debate:--Vote Checkmark0 points
Agreed with after the debate:--Vote Checkmark0 points
Who had better conduct:--Vote Checkmark1 point
Had better spelling and grammar:--Vote Checkmark1 point
Made more convincing arguments:Vote Checkmark--3 points
Used the most reliable sources:--Vote Checkmark2 points
Total points awarded:30 
Reasons for voting decision: Pro had more structure and meaning to his poem.
Vote Placed by wierdman 6 years ago
wierdman
Man-is-goodMinutemanTied
Agreed with before the debate:--Vote Checkmark0 points
Agreed with after the debate:--Vote Checkmark0 points
Who had better conduct:--Vote Checkmark1 point
Had better spelling and grammar:--Vote Checkmark1 point
Made more convincing arguments:Vote Checkmark--3 points
Used the most reliable sources:Vote Checkmark--2 points
Total points awarded:50 
Reasons for voting decision: this was a very interesting debate
Vote Placed by SuperRobotWars 6 years ago
SuperRobotWars
Man-is-goodMinutemanTied
Agreed with before the debate:--Vote Checkmark0 points
Agreed with after the debate:--Vote Checkmark0 points
Who had better conduct:--Vote Checkmark1 point
Had better spelling and grammar:--Vote Checkmark1 point
Made more convincing arguments:Vote Checkmark--3 points
Used the most reliable sources:--Vote Checkmark2 points
Total points awarded:30 
Reasons for voting decision: Thought M-I-G did a better job.
Vote Placed by ApostateAbe 6 years ago
ApostateAbe
Man-is-goodMinutemanTied
Agreed with before the debate:--Vote Checkmark0 points
Agreed with after the debate:--Vote Checkmark0 points
Who had better conduct:--Vote Checkmark1 point
Had better spelling and grammar:--Vote Checkmark1 point
Made more convincing arguments:--Vote Checkmark3 points
Used the most reliable sources:--Vote Checkmark2 points
Total points awarded:00 
Reasons for voting decision: Neutralizing my own counter-vote-bomb of Seabiscuit now that SuperRobotWars and wierdman did the same thing. Fellas, only one voter should counter a vote bomber, or else your own sin is equal.
Vote Placed by Seabiscuit 6 years ago
Seabiscuit
Man-is-goodMinutemanTied
Agreed with before the debate:--Vote Checkmark0 points
Agreed with after the debate:--Vote Checkmark0 points
Who had better conduct:-Vote Checkmark-1 point
Had better spelling and grammar:-Vote Checkmark-1 point
Made more convincing arguments:-Vote Checkmark-3 points
Used the most reliable sources:-Vote Checkmark-2 points
Total points awarded:07 
Reasons for voting decision: I was touched by minuteman
Vote Placed by medic0506 6 years ago
medic0506
Man-is-goodMinutemanTied
Agreed with before the debate:--Vote Checkmark0 points
Agreed with after the debate:--Vote Checkmark0 points
Who had better conduct:Vote Checkmark--1 point
Had better spelling and grammar:Vote Checkmark--1 point
Made more convincing arguments:Vote Checkmark--3 points
Used the most reliable sources:Vote Checkmark--2 points
Total points awarded:70 
Reasons for voting decision: Con was a troll
Vote Placed by tudaloo 6 years ago
tudaloo
Man-is-goodMinutemanTied
Agreed with before the debate:--Vote Checkmark0 points
Agreed with after the debate:--Vote Checkmark0 points
Who had better conduct:--Vote Checkmark1 point
Had better spelling and grammar:-Vote Checkmark-1 point
Made more convincing arguments:--Vote Checkmark3 points
Used the most reliable sources:--Vote Checkmark2 points
Total points awarded:01 
Reasons for voting decision: It was a hard decision for me. I liked minuteman poems a little bit better. Man-is-good also did a great job