The Instigator
Electrolance
Pro (for)
Tied
0 Points
The Contender
Conspiracyrisk
Con (against)
Tied
0 Points

A carpet mat can burn lightning with enough heat.

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Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 4/11/2016 Category: Science
Updated: 7 months ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 231 times Debate No: 89525
Debate Rounds (5)
Comments (7)
Votes (0)

 

Electrolance

Pro

Carpet mats have been shown to do devastating damage to humans themselves because of the natural heating it has. You see, this process is not at all a difficult concept. Remember that time when you were 8 years old and you rubbed your feet on the carpet for heat? That explains it all. The vast magnitude of friction contributes to that process of you heating up your feet, but such an amount of heat cannot be exerted in a few seconds just from friction itself. Carpet mats have natural heating that allows it to exert and maintain a high temperature.

So where does this argument go from here? Well... if in just a few seconds the friction combined with natural heating could heat up feet, this means that it can keep heating up until it reaches the highest possible temperature. Lightning has a temperature that only goes up to the hundred milions, but if enough heat can build up from a carpet mat, it could theoretically "burn" a lightning bolt because it's sheer heat would absorb the lightning'slo heat and deflect it with it's high energy from the friction.

If a mat could heat up 3 degrees Fahrenheit in 10 seconds, then it could heat up 3,000,000,000 degrees in 10,000,000,000 seconds. That would be enough to cancel out the lightning.

https://www.ice.gov...
Conspiracyrisk

Con

I believe my opponent has a fundamental misunderstanding of what lightning actually is. Put simply, lightning is just an enormous jolt of static electricity.

Static electricity is very simple. When one surface has more electrons than protons, it has a negative charge. When another surface has more protons than electrons, it has a positive charge. Opposite charges attract, so when a substance with a positive charge approaches a substance with a negative charge, electrons may transfer from one surface to the other. This creates a jolt of electricity known as static electricity.

Pro states:
"So where does this argument go from here? Well... if in just a few seconds the friction combined with natural heating could heat up feet, this means that it can keep heating up until it reaches the highest possible temperature. Lightning has a temperature that only goes up to the hundred milions, [sic] but if enough heat can build up from a carpet mat, it could theoretically "burn" a lightning bolt because it's sheer heat would absorb the lightning'slo [sic] heat and deflect it with it's high energy from the friction."

While it may be theoretically possible for carpet to generate more static electricity than a typical lightning bolt (though I find this to be incredibly unlikely), static electricity does not "absorb" other static electricity. Remember, electricity is simply a flow of electrons. So, the electrons would simply flow past each other. Since lightning is not a physical object, it also cannot be burnt. There would be no "friction" from the two jolts of energy because they are not physical objects. Electrons don't behave in the way my opponent argues they do.

Pro states:
"If a mat could heat up 3 degrees Fahrenheit in 10 seconds, then it could heat up 3,000,000,000 degrees in 10,000,000,000 seconds. That would be enough to cancel out the lightning."

If the forces causing the mat to heat up were consistent, the mat may be able to heat up to 3 billion degrees (if it somehow didn't disintegrate). However, as I explained earlier, the jolt of electricity it could produce wouldn't "cancel out" the lightning; it would simply be hotter and more energetic.

Pro also links to a source that is completely irrelevant to this debate.

A simple explanation of static electricity:
http://www.sciencemadesimple.com...
Debate Round No. 1
Electrolance

Pro

Electrolance forfeited this round.
Conspiracyrisk

Con

Conspiracyrisk forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 2
Electrolance

Pro

Electrolance forfeited this round.
Conspiracyrisk

Con

I apologize for forfeiting last round; debate.org was glitching out weirdly. It doesn't look like it matters, though.
Debate Round No. 3
Electrolance

Pro

Electrolance forfeited this round.
Conspiracyrisk

Con

:|

sigh...
Debate Round No. 4
Electrolance

Pro

Electrolance forfeited this round.
Conspiracyrisk

Con

Conspiracyrisk forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 5
7 comments have been posted on this debate. Showing 1 through 7 records.
Posted by WAM 8 months ago
WAM
Carpet mats do not possess 'Natural Heating', nor do they 'maintain a high temperature'. That is plain stupid. Introductory physics books explain this. Otherwise, these carpets would have a higher heat than their surroundings, or heat up differently than other objects when exposed to friction, or other objects. Which they do not. Any surface, when enough friction is created, can cause a 'friction burn', and heat up, based on their properties.

Furthermore, more interesting would be where you picked up the concept of 'burning' lightning. To my knowledge about this, lightning can stop fire, not the other way around. Also, you cannot 'deflect' energy like that. Energy need to go somewhere, it needs to be transformed. It does not disappear. Lightning produces a huge amount of energy and I cannot see how it would be affected in the slightest from heat, other than a possible change in molecule movement. But not in a sense that a carpet mat could 'absorb' lightning, 'burn' it or 'deflect' it.
Posted by Hakkayo 8 months ago
Hakkayo
What? you linked to ice.gov a website about the American Immigration and Customs Enforcement, there is nothing on the page that you linked about carpets.
Posted by Electrolance 8 months ago
Electrolance
Ice stands for It's Electric Carpet. But that irrelevant.
Posted by Hakkayo 8 months ago
Hakkayo
I'm interested in this argument, I just don't understand something. Is a carpet mat like a product like an electric blanket? or is it just a piece of carpet? also why did you link to ICE?
Posted by Electrolance 8 months ago
Electrolance
Nah jk only a moron would say that.

90 degrees on a cold day.
Posted by Electrolance 8 months ago
Electrolance
It starts out at room temperature.
Posted by MagicAintReal 8 months ago
MagicAintReal
At what temperature does the mat itself burn?
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