The Instigator
UnendingRevision
Pro (for)
Tied
0 Points
The Contender
AbsentMorn
Con (against)
Tied
0 Points

Aid Money Directed at HIV/AIDS Should be more Directed at Prevention than Treatment (ARVs)

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Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 3/7/2015 Category: Politics
Updated: 1 year ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 419 times Debate No: 71279
Debate Rounds (3)
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UnendingRevision

Pro

Currently, the US government spends billions of dollars each year combating HIV/AIDS and dealing with the consequences of the virus. A large percentage of that money is set aside for treatment rather than prevention and I am arguing that we should adjust our spending so it favors prevention more.
AbsentMorn

Con

The US government is not something I agree with very often, but this time is an exception. By using the money to go towards prevention, you limit the number of people who are able to be helped by the treatment. But by spending money towards treatment, and eventually the cure to HIV/AIDS, you are able to not only be able to save those already diagnosed with it, but those who could be diagnosed in the future. If we did put prevention first, all of those people who have it already are left to fend for themselves. Sure, prevention is a good thing, but in this case, as of right now, we should focus on treatment.
Debate Round No. 1
UnendingRevision

Pro

Finding a cure for HIV is undoubtedly a noble and worthwhile cause. I agree that a large percentage of money should go towards finding a cure. However, too much money is spent on treating individuals who are HIV positive and not enough preventing people from getting it in the first place.
I have been living in Uganda for the last two years. During the early part of the 21st century, HIV/AIDS rates plummeted in the country to a low point of 6.4% in 2006. The country was held up as a success story in the fight against the disease. However, rates are on the rise again, and currently stand at 7.2%. This is occurring despite the very successful circumcision campaign (which can reduce transmission by 60%) in the country. When I asked health professionals about this new trend, they explained that ARVs are making it harder for people to know who is HIV positive. In addition, there is a misconception that ARVs prevent transmission (they reduce it, but don't prevent). ARVs are very expensive, costing hundreds of dollars per person per year. Although I'd love to have money for everything, you must prioritize. I personally think that if those hundreds of dollars can prevent one person from contracting the virus instead, then the money was better utilized.
AbsentMorn

Con

AbsentMorn forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 2
UnendingRevision

Pro

Education about the causes and effects of HIV/AIDS has helped curb the problem significantly, but there are still major barriers we need to overcome. Its amazing how many misconceptions there are about the virus, given how impactful it has been on the African continent.

Here are just a few of the things I have heard:
Having sex with a virgin cures HIV. (very common belief)
If a woman's on her period, she can't get the disease.
White people created HIV to kill Africans.
Condoms give a person cancer.
People can only get HIV from sex.

Combating ignorance can go a long way in the battle against this virus. In addition, providing protection methods against HIV/AIDS is a better use of our money then very expensive ARVs.
AbsentMorn

Con

AbsentMorn forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 3
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