The Instigator
nathanabbey
Pro (for)
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The Contender
LostintheEcho1498
Con (against)
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Alexander the great was more important in our history than Julius Caesar

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Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 5/28/2014 Category: Philosophy
Updated: 2 years ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 2,013 times Debate No: 55591
Debate Rounds (5)
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nathanabbey

Pro

Hello, I am arguing my point that Alexander the great was a more influential factor in our history, than the famous Roman, Julius Caesar. Alexander the great conquered 2/3 of the known world, accomplished the impossible and achieved what no man thought possible.

In the words of a colleague of his, 'a man with no equal in all the world' Julius Caesar achieved a considerable amount, with the limitless funding of one of the biggest and most stable empires the world has ever seen. Caesar had it handed to him on a plate, so I do not believe that Caesars achievements come close to what Alexander did in his 15 year campaign. Anyone who dares to argue against, come on in!
LostintheEcho1498

Con

Hola! I am going to keep this shorter as you have so here we go.

Julius Caesar was a significant figure for several reasons:
1. He was the first Emperor of Rome and was made so by the people.
2. He started the Empire of Rome and paved the way for his nephew Augustus.
3. His military conquests expanded Rome to new sizes and was responsible for the conquering of most of Northern Europe which allowed for the great peace in Rome for many years after.
4. Without Julius, the Empire would have stayed as a Republic and events may not have happened as they did, for better or worse we do not know.
As these are important points let me refute the Pro's view.
Alexander the Great did create a large Empire that was the largest ever created to this day but he failed to do one thing that Julius Caesar was able to do. Keep the Empire together. The Roman Empire is famous for its long-lasting Empire that had large borders and peace. Alexander the Great took over most of the world but soon lost his Empire. It is worthless to take over if you cannot keep it.
I hope for an interesting debate. Over to you Pro!
Debate Round No. 1
nathanabbey

Pro

1. Julius Caesar was in fact not the first emporer, it was his son Octavian, better known as Augustus. He did indeed lay down the foundations for Augustus to become emperor but the senate decided against it and assasinated Caesar, on the 15th of march, 44BC. This is where the ides of march comes from. Anyway in my opinion i believe it was more down to Marc Antony and Lepidus in the second triumvirate that helped Augustus take charge in Rome. They led a campaign against the senators who organized the assasination of Caesar, this helped to prevent another occurance of this sort. After this the triumvirate split up, Lepidus was exiled and Antony and Caesar went into a huge civil war. The winner would take the roman empire, the loser would lose everything. With the help of admiral Agrippa, Antony lost at the battle of Actium and Octavian took the Roman and set up a dynasty that would last hundreds of years. So to correct you, Caesar did not pave the way for Octavian and Octavian was not his nephew but in fact his adopted son.

The third point i can not argue against, solid arguement. But Caesar conquering the barbaric tribes of Europe, does that compare to oblitterating the strongest and biggest empire ever? Alexander destroyed the persian empire in ten years, outnumbered and massivlely out equipped, he led a campaign against the global power of the world in his time. Caesar had the backup of the biggest and wealthiest empire in the known world, as well as this he was fighting against badly equipped, badly trained barbarians.

4. Julius did lay down the path for the republic to be formed, but it was infact down to Augustus that the Roman empire was estabilished.
LostintheEcho1498

Con

To start, good job. I actually did not know that Octavian was adopted. I also checked and found that Caesar was not the first emperor and thank you for that correction. Back to the debate:

1. I am going to see if I can change your's and other's minds about Caesar. One thing that was important to the Roman Republic was the fact that it was, in fact, a Republic. The people enjoyed the fact that they could vote, in the beginning. Then the government started to corrupt and the senators and consuls had gained more power than they were originally to have. The people realized this problem and so did Caesar. From an early age he knew this and made a campaign for life. He became a symbol of the people, creating reforms in favor of the people and mediating between Pompey and Sulla, the two consuls at the time. He gained the trust of both political figures and the people of Rome, and when he declared himself dictator for life, only his political opponents were part of his assasination. Caesar made a name for his family and got the influence that his adopted son Octavian used to his advantage. Octavian actually was famous for living like a commoner and actually called himself the Princeps Civitatis ("First Citizen"). As for the people who helped Octavian later on they actually did not make his rule much easier. Mark Antony commited suicide and Lepidus was exiled for treason. It then fell upon Octavian to create the empire. Augustus then created the Pax Romana or the "Roman Peace" with the help of the armies he recieved from Caesar. Upon further research I found that Caesar was the great uncle of Octavian but did make him his adopted son as well. Now to get away from tangents, back to Caesar and Alexander. Alexander the Great was great for several reasons:
1. He created an Empire that was and still is the largest recorded empire in history.
2. He (as you said) did destroy the Persian Empire quite quickly.
The tactics that Alexander used, actually, were a mix of Ancient Roman and Greek tactics. Alexander was born hundreds of years before Caesars time, though, but the tactics used were still partly Roman. Another point is that both died and their death caused a civil war. The difference was that Caesar had given the tools to create peace while Alexander did not. The Romans continued on but the Macedonians lost most of their Empire.

So far so good! Over to you Pro!

-http://www.roman-empire.net...
-Cassius Dio's Roman History: Books 45"56, English translation
-Gallery of the Ancient Art: August Humor of Augustus
-Life of Augustus by Nicolaus of Damascus, English translation
Suetonius' biography of Augustus, Latin text with English translation
-The Res Gestae Divi Augusti (The Deeds of Augustus, his own account: complete Latin and Greek texts with facing English translation)
-The Via Iulia Augusta: road built by the Romans; constructed on the orders of Augustus between the 13"12 B.C.
-http://en.wikipedia.org...
Debate Round No. 2
nathanabbey

Pro

nathanabbey forfeited this round.
LostintheEcho1498

Con

Vote for me and you shall see
That all is well when voting you shall
For Con is the winner and there is a sinner
The Pro gave his all but now he must fall
There is nothing left but to see I am best.
Debate Round No. 3
nathanabbey

Pro

nathanabbey forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 4
nathanabbey

Pro

nathanabbey forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 5
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