The Instigator
marble08
Pro (for)
Tied
0 Points
The Contender
starky393
Con (against)
Tied
0 Points

All persons in process to become a cop should take one year of law classes relevant to their job.

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Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 6/1/2016 Category: Politics
Updated: 11 months ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 131 times Debate No: 92200
Debate Rounds (3)
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marble08

Pro

All those wishing to become police officers within a state should, along with the training already in place, be required to successfully take law classes relevant to their job: constitutional law, civil law, public law, etc. This would not mean the officers, after having completed the required law classes, would be lawyers. However, they would go out into the field with a deeper understanding of law -- and, as a result, what they should and should not do -- in hopes to improve community policing.
starky393

Con

You have attempted to argue that police officers should undergo an extra year of training in order to deepen their knowledge of law, particularly constitutional, civil and public law. I would like to open by confirming the role of an officer as a civil agent whose job is to enforce the law and maintain public order, NOT, as you stated, to be a 'lawyer'. Therefore, I see no significance in the department investing in extra law classes simply to 'deepen' officer's understanding of laws that don't directly concern their line of work anyway. The AFP has described their training program as "a permanent position doing real work that contributes directly to staying one step ahead in a rapidly evolving CRIMINAL environment". I'm not saying that it's not important to have an understanding of other areas of law, but most officers already have a decent knowledge of other laws from general studies alone. As long as officers have undergone the correct training when it comes to their area of expertise (Criminal law) it really makes no difference. As for IMPROVING community policing, you'd just be investing millions of dollars into a program that's not wholly significant.
Debate Round No. 1
marble08

Pro

It should first be noted that I never suggested an *extra* year of law classes. I merely suggested a year. Police academies range anywhere from 12 weeks to a year to complete [source: http://policelink.monster.com...]. Those who are in 12 week programs would merely prolong their training until they have completed all academy requirements, including law classes. More relevant, those in yearlong programs would simply have their law courses proportionately distributed throughout their year, working in concert with the other arms of their training. We agree that an officer is an agent of the state, sworn to "enforce law and maintain public order." Furthermore, we also agree that officers should not waste their time learning law that does not "directly concern their line of work"" Our disagreement seems to arise at what "directly" concerns their line of work. So, let it be known: the aim of requiring officers to take law courses is not solely to improve the policing of criminals or potential criminals; it also aims to improve the officers" regulation of themselves " both hold the utmost relevancy to modern policing. Even criminals are allotted certain rights found in the constitution that officers are bound by law to respect. All one has to do is login to Facebook or Twitter to see numerous videos of officers compromising the constitutional rights of citizens, criminal or otherwise, during interaction. I do not imagine these compromises are simply a result of officer"s negligence, which is likely in some cases, but also of their sheer ignorance. It would firmly stand to reason that these compromises, which serve as a threat to democracy, could be assuaged through active legal education required of officers. This does not mean officers would be taking courses that are not directly concerned with daily interaction with the citizenry: contract law, anti-trust law, federal tax law, and so on. However, for example, an officer learning, in detail, what courts have deemed an "illegal search and seizure" would greatly improve ethical policing within the bounds of law. You stated that most officers already have sufficient knowledge of law. Even if I were to accept your assertion that "most officers already have a decent knowledge of other laws" (not sure what you mean by "other laws), not even "most", considering how essential law enforcement is to maintaining order, will suffice. All -- the entire collective -- those seeking to be officers should, or should have the chance to, acquire a deeper understanding and knowledge of the law most relevant in day to day interactions.
starky393

Con

starky393 forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 2
marble08

Pro

marble08 forfeited this round.
starky393

Con

starky393 forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 3
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