The Instigator
CierraNicole
Pro (for)
Losing
0 Points
The Contender
Chaotic_Neutral
Con (against)
Winning
12 Points

America is NOT obese.

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Post Voting Period
The voting period for this debate has ended.
after 2 votes the winner is...
Chaotic_Neutral
Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 5/14/2013 Category: Miscellaneous
Updated: 4 years ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 1,969 times Debate No: 33703
Debate Rounds (3)
Comments (2)
Votes (2)

 

CierraNicole

Pro

Everybody says that America is a country full of obese slobs, correct? I don't believe that to be true. I walk down the street every day, and through my school every day, and I hardly see any overweight people at all. Sure, there are some kids who could do with a diet, but that doesn't make all of America fat. Does it?
Chaotic_Neutral

Con


“I walk down the street every day, and through my school every day, and I hardly see any overweight people at all.”


This is an example of the 'unrepresentative sample' fallacy [1]. You are using a small segment of the country and drawing a conclusion about the whole population from your findings. This is problematic because (the United States of) America is a very heterogeneous country in many facets. It is:



  • A wealthy country, although it contains many poor areas (such as Detroit and Cleveland).

  • A murderous country, while containing many areas with low murder rates (such as Hawaii, Iowa, and New Hampshire).

  • A racially diverse country, while containing many racially homogeneous areas (such as Maine and North Dakota).


Any resident of these counterexamples could make a similar claim to yours about their own area of residence and draw a conclusion about the population of the U.S. that is very false. The United States has a demonstrably high obesity rate [2]:



Thus, it is accurate to say that the United States is an obese nation.



Sources:


1) http://onegoodmove.org...


2) upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/9/9d/Obesity_country_comparison_-_path.svg



Debate Round No. 1
CierraNicole

Pro

Ok, fine. I only used a small portion, but I know for a fact that all of america is not fat, there are many people who ARE obese, but not all of America. True, the obesity rates are getting higher, but it's not any of anybody else's business how much people weigh. It's their choice, and a few people choices--laziness, or overeating--don't affect the whole country.
Chaotic_Neutral

Con

True, to say "America is obese" is a generalization, but the best way to judge a country's obesity rate is by comparison. The U.S. in 1800 was very wealthy, but in today's world their standard of living would be lower than most developed nations. Like wealth, obesity rates are considered high or low in a relative way. There is no absolute threshold for what would make a country "obese", but it is evident that something is causing the U.S. to pull ahead of the competition when it comes to obesity in first-world nations.

While I will not argue about policy implications, since that is not the topic of debate, I will reject the notion that obesity in America does not affect the whole country. Obesity cost $190 billion in health care expenses in 2005 [1] and could reach $344 billion by 2018 [2]. This means higher health insurance premiums for many non-obese Americans.

Another concern regarding America's obesity rate is how it affects children. Childhood obesity is clearly on the rise:



It is arguable that obesity is a choice for many adults, but lack of concern for a child's health can cause them many problems that the child was likely not aware would result from obesity. This includes negative health affects, as well as the potential for bullying and poor self-esteem. Obesity does indeed correlate with self-reported emotional issus:



And to pass these on to the next generation willingly would be irresponsible.

America is an obese nation and it is worth addressing.

Sources:

1) http://www.hsph.harvard.edu...

2) http://usatoday30.usatoday.com...
Debate Round No. 2
CierraNicole

Pro

I agree that childhood obesity is rising, but that is the parents' problem. Not everybody else's. If the parent thinks the child is too overweight, then they can do something, not concern the rest of America with it. And most of the time, with the negative emotions, it's because if they're feeling depressed, or stressed, or sad, or anything else negative, they'll just sit on their lazy a$$es and stare at the TV all day, thinking "Oh, whoa is me. I'm getting fat because I'm depressed." You know what, no, they're not getting fat because they're depressed. They're getting fat because they're LAZY.
Chaotic_Neutral

Con

As I've proven in previous rounds, obesity is indeed high in the United States. I am not arguing that a particular action needs to be taken because of this, just that the "obesity problem" can be harmful to those who become obese by choice or otherwise. Laziness may indeed be a large source of the problem, but depression may be both a cause and an effect of obesity. As stated before, obesity DOES affect the rest of the population by raising healthcare costs. And the intent in pointing out childhood obesity is to demonstrate how parents do not deal with the problem effectively, so to expect them to resolve it is irrational.
Debate Round No. 3
2 comments have been posted on this debate. Showing 1 through 2 records.
Posted by Chaotic_Neutral 4 years ago
Chaotic_Neutral
True, body fat % is more telling, but I think these exceptions are probably rare. BMI is used, obviously, because it's much easier to measure. Very few people are bodybuilders and the correlation between BMI and body fat % is high, evidence for this can be found from a quick google images search of bmi and body fat.
Posted by maleusdei 4 years ago
maleusdei
This a mute debate based on the fact that both parties assume obese means fat when it does not. Obese is based on the Body Mass Index of height and weight. To drive this point home I will use 8 time Mr Olympia Champion Ronnie Coleman as an example. Ronnie Coleman weighs 297 lbs on stage at 5'11. According to BMI standards he is morbidly obese even with a body fat percentage of 6%.
2 votes have been placed for this debate. Showing 1 through 2 records.
Vote Placed by mananlak 4 years ago
mananlak
CierraNicoleChaotic_NeutralTied
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Total points awarded:06 
Reasons for voting decision: Conduct: Pro made several unproved assumptions and got way off topic. Arguments: Con countered everything brilliantly. Sources: Con had some.
Vote Placed by SaintMichael741 4 years ago
SaintMichael741
CierraNicoleChaotic_NeutralTied
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Total points awarded:06 
Reasons for voting decision: Easy win for con. Pro needed to elaborate more in her points. Some citations on her part would have gave her more credibility as well.