The Instigator
KJVPrewrather
Pro (for)
Tied
0 Points
The Contender
Truth-Over-Emotion
Con (against)
Tied
0 Points

American citizens have the right to not participate in a binary political process.

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Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 12/10/2017 Category: Politics
Updated: 1 month ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 119 times Debate No: 105705
Debate Rounds (3)
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KJVPrewrather

Pro

What I mean is many Americans are moderates, and identify with both parties.
Truth-Over-Emotion

Con

I'm afraid I do not quite understand your point. You are stating clear facts. Yes, we have the right to not participate in our binary political process, and yes, most Americans are moderate. If you are complaining that Americans only focus on one party, then that issue lies within our voting system.

America, and many other countries, have what's called a First-Pass-The-Post voting system. People only pick the first candidate they want and then the ballots are gathered together, with the candidate that receives the most votes coming out on top. America has an electoral college added into our voting system (equal representation and such), but it still has the same basic concept. Unfortunately that means people are pressured into picking between the majority parties (which are always a certain party and their opposition) if they feel as though they don't want to essentially "throw away" their vote. This is why the third party candidates will never win.

There is a system that works a bit differently (you'll have to forgive me, I don't remember the name of it) that no country to my knowledge has tried yet. This system is more of a preference system than the "black and white" system that First-Pass-The-Post is. People choose their top five favorite candidates. If the first one doesn't win enough votes, it'll keep going down the line until a winner is chosen. Obviously this system would lead to higher approval rates.

I suck at explaining these things, so if you're actually interested, here's a great short video that explains it quite well.
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https://www.youtube.com...

Now, whether or not the United States will adopt said system, that's unlikely. It's a big change that could lead to some major flaws. If this wasn't the question, may you please specify? Thank you.
Debate Round No. 1
KJVPrewrather

Pro

I am a centrist. I have liberal, moderate, and conservative beliefs and if Bernie runs, he has my vote, but I feel if I were to find a centrist candidate who shares most of my beliefs, I would support him or her, and rightfully so.
Truth-Over-Emotion

Con

Yes, but a majority of Americans are fairly...apathetic towards politics. People are just more concerned with other things to look real deep into what a candidate believes and what other types of candidates are available. They get their information off of whatever news they hear, which tends to be the 'either, or' candidates (conservative and liberal). And it's always conservative and liberal because those parties were the only parties for a long, long time. That's not saying there aren't people out there who wouldn't vote for another candidate, it's just that those candidates just can't get enough publicity to make themselves known to gather in the votes.
Debate Round No. 2
KJVPrewrather

Pro

Not really. Most are centrists who cared about the individual issues, not the political binary. For example, I'm conservative on abortion, liberal on healthcare and contraception, moderate on guns, and revile even the candidates I vote for. I think we should abolish the party system and vote based on ideology, not party, because we get ****ed no matter what.
Truth-Over-Emotion

Con

But it all comes back to the amount of publicity of candidate gets. If people don't know they exist (most people don't go on the Internet and search for potential candidates with views the same as theirs), then they will not vote for them. They rely on the media to get their political information, and 9 times out of 10-it's about the two main parties, and not the independent ones. Another thing: I'm not against that way of voting. It sounds like a good idea. But the "preference" system is more likely to be implemented than ideology. People don't like change, and this would be quite a drastic change. It would be extremely difficult to implement. I would also like to make one more thing clear: I'm not against the ways you are speaking of. I'm moderate myself, but most people don't want to change the way our electoral system is set up, even if it's dividing this country further and further apart.
Debate Round No. 3
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