The Instigator
ColeTrain
Pro (for)
Winning
3 Points
The Contender
Dpowell
Con (against)
Losing
0 Points

Apple [iOS] vs Android (Apple Pro, Android Con)

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Post Voting Period
The voting period for this debate has ended.
after 1 vote the winner is...
ColeTrain
Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 1/7/2015 Category: Technology
Updated: 2 years ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 1,099 times Debate No: 67979
Debate Rounds (3)
Comments (6)
Votes (1)

 

ColeTrain

Pro

Accept the challenge in this first round. :)
This will be debating which operating system is better, iOS for Apple, or Android (Ex.: Ice Cream Sandwich)
Dpowell

Con

I will accept this debate.
Debate Round No. 1
ColeTrain

Pro

Thank you for accepting this debate. First and foremost, I would like to point out that this debate is obviously not a moral or ethical based argument, thus, any arguments pertaining to such areas are irrelevant. Let's move on to the meat of this round:

I would like to point out that although "Android" operating systems did surface prior to the release of the first device using iOS (the first iPhone), it was not called Android and did not function in agreement with "modern" as it was a beta version. Secondly, the first "smart" operating system was released by Apple as iOS 1.0, in concurrency to Apple's first iPhone. This version was released on June 29, 2007. Following Apple's release, Android released the beta operating system of Alpha (1.0) in November of 2007. In September of 2008, it was released as an actual legitimate version, not just beta. The first Android-based smartphone, the HTC Dream (or T-Mobile G1), released in September of 2008. This release of an Android operating system being used on a phone came over a year after Apple released their first iPhone.

Furthermore, I doubt many people would go as far as arguing that the HTC Dream was superior to the first iPhone. Some people speculate that the hurried release of the HTC Dream was an effort to push out an unfinished product simply to gain recognition and spark competition. The HTC Dream did not include a virtual keyboard (a true staple to modern-day smartphones) and had only a 3 mega-pixel camera. Less than a year after their first smartphone, and before any Android smartphone was released, Apple unveiled their next piece of technology, the iPhone 3G (June 11, 2008).

It is evident that Apple obviously did have a recognizable and advantageous lead in the early development of smart technology. Such a gap existed between the releases of the first two productive and successful smartphones that plagiarism is not something to overlook. My opponent may argue that Android only innovated. While that is true, to some degree, Android got their ideas from Apple. That's the way a business works. Obviously there must be competition as it is vital to innovation and improvement of technology. However, in regards to which technology is better, we must consider the roots.

Next in line, I would like to make known the history of operating system versions for each company.
iOS (Apple): 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8. [Total count: 8]
Android: Alpha, Beta, Cupcake, Donut, Eclair, Froyo, Gingerbread, Honeycomb, Ice Cream Sandwich, Jelly Bean, KitKat, Lollipop. [Total count: 12]
As is evident, there are many more versions of Android operating systems. This in mind, iOS 8 is consistent with the innovation of Android's system of Honeycomb. This leaves Apple quite a bit of room to improve beyond its already exceptional level. On the other hand, it has taken Android 12 major renovations to reach their current level while Apple has needed only 8.

Another argument that is often brought up when questioning the superiority of iOS or Android over the other is customization. Apple Inc. itself recognizes that customization for iOS is not as in-depth as that of Android, yet that isn't a problem. Apple explains that iOS is "designed for simplicity." Simplicity is simple, yet elegant and easy-to-use. That's exactly what iOS is. This style of operating system can appeal to a larger demographic, reaching to younger people and even to elders who are behind with the technology of today.

Apple's easy-to-use strategy seems works very well considering its newest phone's (iPhone 6) recent success in comparison to Android's top phone, the Samsung Galaxy S5. In the first weekend of its release, Apple sold over 10 million phones. Following Samsung's release of the Galaxy S5, they were only able to sell 12 million in the first three months. This comparison is evidently in favor of Apple and the iOS operating systems. Popularity of the iPhone is superior versus any other Android device as well.

As another area of analysis, I would like to bring up the marketplace to download apps and music. With Apple the place to get those apps is an intriguing and useful place called the App Store. Conversely, Android operating systems include something called the Google Play Store. As of recently, the rough estimate of apps in each store individually has hovered between 1.2 million to 1.3 million apps for user to choose from. Statisticians project that the Google Play Store will very soon have a solid hold on more apps in the store; however, the reason for the climbing number for Google Play is concerning.

Google has had problems with viruses and "fake" apps slipping through its net because of the relaxed nature of app acceptance. Google is more susceptible and vulnerable to these problems because little restrictions or guidelines are in place to monitor app content when an app is submitted to the store. This can prove to be a problem when viruses or fake apps are released to the public and raise high charges for innocent consumers. Apple, however, is much more strict and safe when accepting or denying apps from developers to place in their App Store.

As a last topic of discussion for my portion of this round, I would like to explain compatibility problems with Android operating systems. When iOS is updated, the new version is compatible with the iPad, iPhone, and late iPod. These updates even reach far back to older devices and still work seamlessly. Yet Android operating systems don't function the same. Often times, a new update to an operating system has adverse effects. Because there are so many different types of phones that like to run the Android system, updates and upgrades require certain specs to work. Without the latest and greatest Android-based phones, it can be difficult for your device to meet the necessary qualifications. Even if it does work, the process is often very slow due to the different type of device for which it was originally meant.

Thank you for your time, and I highly anticipate your response in the latter branch of this round. Good luck! :)
Dpowell

Con

I'd like to thank my opponent for allowing me the privilege to accept this debate, for the history lesson, and I'd like to bring up that my opponent forgot to list Android's most popular phone so far... The Droid.

Section 1:
Android has better app management. One can easily force quit, or uninstall apps whenever they want. Plus they don't need to use Google Chrome to find the apps fore they have the Google play store. This all also comes with the ability to set your own app default.

With IOS 8 you can only force quit an app by swiping it toward a corner, or uninstall is by "long pressing". Plus you have little to no control over what your default browser is.

Section 2:
The Android has had the ability of "widgets" for quite a while. Apple got that ability long after Android did, so its not really the big thing. Here I'd say they're more underdeveloped that Android.

Section 3:
Apple's phones still have their apps all bunched up, making you search through a bunch of different pages for the apps that you want. IOS users have no control over this, and it doesn't look like Apple's planning to solve this problem.

Android as I have stated earlier, give the user the ability to control this. They can do whatever they want to their app interface, including banning apps that they don't want.

Section 4:
Apple can't tell you how to get somewhere by bus. According to this document I'm reading, IOS 6 had a bad map problem, which got fixed... Well... Almost.

Google provides options for other transits, such as boats, buses, and trains.

Section 5:
( Though Samsung and LG have nothing to do with Android seeing how its owned by Lucas Arts). Samsung and LG have screen splitting abilities, allowing the user to use two apps at once.

While IOS 8 doesn't have this ability, Android L will supposedly have it at release, but it hasn't been confirmed. Which is further than Apple has gotten.

Section 6:
Android tablets give you the luxury of different profiles. Apple has only had this on their computers.

Section 7:
Apple can use these chip things to pay for things... At least for about a month.

Android can do that, and more. It can put up a do not disturb sign in you room or something like that.

Section 8:
IOS having a required storage space limit to upgrade, people begin getting stressed out to delete things. This can cause problems in the sales for Apple. People would be too stressed to get the upgrades, even the ones they have to pay for.

While IOS only has 5.8 GB free, Android has 128 GB more open space. Which seems like a better advantage?

Section 9:
Android offers many different ways to protect the contents of your phone. Pins and shape tracing is just a couple of examples.

IOS only has pin numbers, fingerprint scanning, and swiping.

Section 10:
I'm sure everyone knows how IOS' are mostly reliable for breaking. This has been proven many times. Apple products will usually break with the slightest drop. It usually takes a bit more force to break an Android.

We can all agree that they both have the same weakness though. Water.

Thank you for your time.
Debate Round No. 2
ColeTrain

Pro

I would like to extend my gratitude to my opponent for responding to my first round of argumentation and for providing me with multiple sections of arguments pertaining to this topic. I would also like to apologize for my late response. Circumstances as they were, I was attending an actual debate tournament this weekend and was not able to access the Internet to see if my opponent had responded. Now he has, and I'd be delighted to see how this turns out.

However, I would like to point out that a few of his sections do not relate to this debate, and I will explain the reasoning as I get to those sections. Furthermore, I would like to point out that my opponent did not attack any of the points that I brought up, nor did he refute any of the reasons I provided as to why iOS is superior to Android operating systems.

Having laid my background in the previous round, I would like to begin by attacking each of my opponent's sections.

Section 1:
Forcing quit is different across different levels of Android operating systems. Potentially, one could force quit more quickly with an iOS system depending on how fast they can double tap the home button and swipe up. Forcing quit is relatively easy on both operating systems, so I don't see the grounds of this argument. Uninstalling an app is also just as easy on and iOS device as an Android device. "Long pressing" as my opponent says, is virtually the same concept as holding the home button on a Samsung device to force quit an app. My opponent makes the indirect claim that iOS users must have Google Chrome to search for and download apps. This is false. Users find their applications through the App Store by default, not through Google Chrome. Most people agree that Google Chrome is one of the best operating systems there is, and because many Android devices are owned by Google, a partnership has formed between the two. This results in Google Chrome coming by default to most Android devices. On the other hand, Apple does not have that relationship. iOS designed to run Safari, which it does relatively seamlessly.

Section 2:
While widgets are useful in some cases, they do not fit the compact iOS initial design. iOS wasn't designed to support them, and probably won't in the future. Personally, I believe that widgets are of less importance than apps, and Apple has realized this. Therefore, apps have been their primary focus to perfect.

Section 3:
I don't see how Apple's apps are any more "bunched up" than an Android device. Especially with the releases of the iPhone 6 and 6+, iOS apps aren't very close together at all. Also, my opponent says that you have to "search through a bunch of different pages for the apps that you want." I get the impression that my opponent has never swiped down in the middle of a page on an iOS device. This instantly opens a very useful search engine to search the phone for not only apps, but a host of other useful things as well. Plus, it is possible to reorder the apps on both operating systems to move one's most commonly used apps to the first page.

Section 4:
My opponent is most likely referring to the introduction of Apple Maps in concurrency to the iPhone 5. Apple was then attempting to introduce something of competition to Google Maps. It was failure, and they reverted back to their original map app, Google Maps. Android uses this same map application, and because of this, there is no reason to debate it.

Section 5:
While my opponent is correct in that Samsung and LG have introduced ways to use two apps simultaneously, this system has not been perfected. I have used this option before, and was displeased with my results. Functionality is greatly reduced, especially on smaller devices. iOS doesn't have this ability, and I hope more precise technology is innovated before they do to ensure a good user experience that wasn't found with LG or Samsung.

Section 6:
Different profiles can easily become confusing, especially if not explicitly customized. It isn't fun to be changing settings and downloading apps for awhile only to realize you were logged in to the wrong account. Furthermore, even though it doesn't necessarily pertain directly to this debate, I would like to point out that Android doesn't have an operating system compatible with computers. Google has Chrome OS, but that is far lacking when compared to Yosemite, or virtually any other Apple operating system for computers.

Section 7:
My opponent does not specify what "chip things" are, yet I will assume he is referring to Apple Pay. Every new innovation has its flaws, just as Apple Pay. It has not yet been perfected, but Apple plans on continuing research to improve this beta version. Furthermore, Apple Pay isn't exactly a part of the operating system and does not really pertain to this debate.

Section 8:
My opponent is likely referring to the required storage space to upgrade to iOS 8 from other versions. I would like to talk about that for a little bit. Many people complain (as my opponent has) about required storage space to install the upgrade. There is an extremely easy solution to that problem. It is also a recommended as an important way to back up files on all devices. It's called iCloud. Individuals can store all of their information in the cloud and free up space on their device. Furthermore, my opponent mentions that Apple only has 5.8 GB of free space. Once again, that is false. 5.8 GB is the amount of free space required to upgrade to iOS 8. In terms of free space, iOS can have over 64 GB with more storage once again on iCloud.

Section 9
Argument:
"Android offers many different ways to protect the contents of your phone. Pins and shape tracing is just a couple of examples.
IOS only has pin numbers, fingerprint scanning, and swiping."
Attack:
In this argument, I feel my opponent made a mistake of even bringing it up. While a few more options might be available with Android, iOS has the advantage here. Fingerprint scanning is some of the most cutting edge modern technology implemented as security for phones and tablets. It's completely personalized and secure and is superior to Android's only competitor to fingerprint identification, Face ID. Face ID can get confused if the individual has a different hairstyle and isn't as accurate.

Section 10:
My opponent's first sentence in this argument is a wreck. "Reliable" and "breaking" are an oxymoron, and his accusation is false. "iOS" doesn't break. iOS is an operating system, therefore it cannot shatter or break by dropping it. Furthermore, as specified in the first round, this debate is about operating systems, not about bodystyle and build of devices. With that in mind, this argument does not relate to this debate and is irrelevant.

As my opponent has stated, we can agree on one weakness that exists within both operating systems, they don't handle water in the circuit board very well. No arguments were made against my case in the first round, so I have nothing further to add to this round of the debate.

Once again, I thank my opponent for allowing me the privilege to debate this topic and wish the best of luck. Thank you for your time. :)
Dpowell

Con

I would like to let my opponent know that I do not mind his late response, fore I have been busy as well. I'd also like to apologize for not putting up the website's address for my information. I will do that at the end of this debate.

My opponent is correct. I have never used an IPhone. I have no intentions too. IOS is well known to be more faulty than the last. Hence if you pay attention IPhones become less and less popular as they come out. And gradually more breakable. That's why if any one has an IPhone now a days its usually one of the first 3. That's if they did their homework first.

Section 1:
Android uses Linux. Which I have to learn is usually one of the most secure PC systems. Having this, makes Androids more PC like, meaning they have more possibilities than most other phones.

Androids can do force quit apps faster, it is common, yet not very common for an Android to not get a good, and fast internet connection. While Apple products are usually slow in general.

Section 2:
My opponent claims that IOS devices support widgets. I'd like to state that this brings up the question: How can a device support something that it has literally no access to?

Section 3:
From what I know, this "search engine" that you say helps you find things more easily, wasn't put into IOS devices until either 6 or 7. It is still invalid and it didn't make things any easier, but it didn't make them more difficult. This maybe because people haven't figured out how to work it yet, though it probably wouldn't help Apple make a better phone.

Section 4:
Yes. I'd also like to add that almost everything Apple does failed. The only truly good IPhone was the first one. This is because it worked as well as the now more popular, Microsoft phones. This is most likely because it was made by Steve Jobbs himself, having worked with Bill Gates prior to the formation of the Apple company.

Section 5:
It has been perfected. This is why the new Microsoft phone is so popular and has been making more money than its rivals. Everyone is happy with this capability.

Section 6:
Android is actually very compatible with computers. I'd like to point out that my opponent was not referring to the newer phones. And profiles really aren't that confusing, they all have different names and they all have different passwords.

Section 7:
That is what I'm referring to.

Section 8:
What I find ironic is that my opponent states that Apple uses cloud. What's ironic about it is that cloud is a Microsoft product. This makes me think that there is no originality to the IPhones. But then again, there never really was since the first one. Plus it still costs a lot of money to update an Apple product.

Other phone products offer updates cheaply or free.

Section 9:
I'd like to bring up that Android actually still has the upper hand. There have been millions- billions of complaints of peoples' cats getting into their IPhone with the fingerprint scanner. So its not secure at all. And if that technology even existed, I'm sure they wouldn't put it in something as useless as an IPhone.

I'd also like to bring up that the facial scanner has proven to be more secure than the fingerprint scanner. Because it scans you FACIAL FEATURES. Hairstyles don't matter.

Section 10:
As he brings this up. I was hypothetically correct. IOS shuts down almost every other hour. It's a faulty system. It always has been. Like I said before, IOS and Safari are the main reasons Apple is making less and less sales.

I'd also like to thank my opponent for this wonderful opportunity to debate this topic.
Debate Round No. 3
6 comments have been posted on this debate. Showing 1 through 6 records.
Posted by ColeTrain 2 years ago
ColeTrain
@Pythasis Right on! :P
Posted by Pythasis 2 years ago
Pythasis
@ColeTrain Hopefully! Maybe get an Apple phone instead! xP
Posted by ColeTrain 2 years ago
ColeTrain
@Pythasis Thanks! Hopefully you can get that phone "problem" fixed. ;)
Posted by Pythasis 2 years ago
Pythasis
@ColeTrain I wanted to vote on this, but my phone (an Android phone ;P) is having issues so I haven't become a confirmed member yet, but I read the entirety of it anyway and wanted to give an opinion, even if I can't officially vote...maybe someone who CAN vote but has no opinion on this will see it and can vote for me! xP

This is what I wanted to write:

"I have to go with pro on this one. ColeTrain had much more well-rounded arguments that convinced me much more than Dpowell, who restated some of the same ideas a few times and didn't refute strongly enough. As an Android user, I'm nearly convinced to get an iPhone now (though my plan with the Android phone is cheaper than I'd find in an iPhone at this point). Criticisms and praises aside, good job to both debaters!"
Posted by ColeTrain 2 years ago
ColeTrain
I am for Apple. :)
Posted by Dpowell 2 years ago
Dpowell
Are you for apple or android?
1 votes has been placed for this debate.
Vote Placed by The-Voice-of-Truth 2 years ago
The-Voice-of-Truth
ColeTrainDpowellTied
Agreed with before the debate:Vote Checkmark--0 points
Agreed with after the debate:Vote Checkmark--0 points
Who had better conduct:--Vote Checkmark1 point
Had better spelling and grammar:--Vote Checkmark1 point
Made more convincing arguments:Vote Checkmark--3 points
Used the most reliable sources:--Vote Checkmark2 points
Total points awarded:30 
Reasons for voting decision: Overall equality, but agree with Pro.