The Instigator
OliveJuice
Pro (for)
Winning
8 Points
The Contender
BroaderPerspective
Con (against)
Losing
0 Points

Are Conscience and Reason Learned?

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Post Voting Period
The voting period for this debate has ended.
after 2 votes the winner is...
OliveJuice
Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 3/16/2014 Category: Science
Updated: 3 years ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 452 times Debate No: 49231
Debate Rounds (4)
Comments (7)
Votes (2)

 

OliveJuice

Pro

"Con" Position: People always have conscience and reason; it is not learned.
"Pro" Position: People do not always have conscience and reason; it is learned.

* Positions listed above are essentially a flexible outline, but stance on the matter must be clearly defined by the opponent taking on the opposite position prior to and during the first round of the argument.

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On a final note, this is my first online debate.

Argument Time: 48 Hours
Character Max: 10,000
Voting Period: 10 Days
Rounds: 4

Round #1: State your claim.
Round #2: Rebut against opponent with more informational support.
Round #3: Refute against opponent once more and strengthen your claim.
Round #4: Explore alternative possibilities and conclude your argument.

Best of luck,
(:
BroaderPerspective

Con

People always have conscience and reason. It is not learned.

Thanks for making that so easy on me.
Debate Round No. 1
OliveJuice

Pro

OliveJuice forfeited this round.
BroaderPerspective

Con

BroaderPerspective forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 2
OliveJuice

Pro

Reason and conscience are two forms of judgment that must be learned by all human beings. However, they are not the same; conscience is a mental obligation to do what is morally or ethically right, as opposed to what is wrong. Similarly, reason is an intelligent and rational perception of a situation. Each is gained during the various stages of growth and development of the human brain. As an infant, one would not have the physical ability to make decisions or choices; since a conscience derives from consciousness, not to be confused with attentiveness, one would not have a conscience without the ability to form their own decisions. This knowledge is emphasized by Scientific American writer Christof Koch,"It is well recognized that infants have no awareness of their own state, emotions and motivations. Even older children who can speak have very limited insight into their own actions." However, as a child matures, he will notice and emulate the world that he is present in as well as the people he interacts with. The child is essentially raised by what he is exposed to, and eventually shapes his own opinions of the surrounding society. Factors include parenting, education, location, societal ideals, and interaction with others. Certain events seem to impact some people more than others, usually depending on the person"s emotional soundness and past events or thoughts. Different backgrounds and moral teachings create differing opinions on the same topics.

Reason is much more easily explained, though not necessarily easier to be taught. Because it is a flexible, yet complex, method of intelligent judgment and decision-making, most people do not fully develop the ability until much later in life, regardless of most exterior factors. For example, an older child that may appear physically developed or intelligent may not have a fully-developed brain that would allow for the concept of reason. It appears that in order for reason to be implemented into a child"s brain, a conscience must first be developed. It is possible that conscience and reason begin to form prior to birth, very much like other developing aspects of a growing fetus. For example, "...linguistic capacities in babies are shaped by the environment they grow up in. Exposure to maternal speech sounds in the muffled confines of the womb enables the fetus to pick up statistical regularities so that the newborn can distinguish its mother"s voice and even her language from others," states Koch, again from Scientific American. This shows that although it would be possible for a baby to come into the world with a small bud of conscience and reason already expanding, it would not have simply been there all along. It must be learned.
BroaderPerspective

Con

BroaderPerspective forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 3
OliveJuice

Pro

Due to the fact that my opponent has forfeited the last round and cannot seem to be reached, this will be the end of the debate.
BroaderPerspective

Con

BroaderPerspective forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 4
7 comments have been posted on this debate. Showing 1 through 7 records.
Posted by OliveJuice 3 years ago
OliveJuice
I'll keep that in mind, thank you.
Posted by BananaPhilosopher 3 years ago
BananaPhilosopher
Eh. Fair enough. Seemed like a fun debate, figured I'd offer. If you ever want to revisit it, I'll probably still be interested.
Posted by OliveJuice 3 years ago
OliveJuice
@BananaPhilosopher It was a question that was proposed during a class and I wanted to take it a step further. That is why the two are paired for the debate. I do not wish to have the same debate again and even if I did, I do not have the time yet. Thank you for the comment.
Posted by BananaPhilosopher 3 years ago
BananaPhilosopher
And that it isn't learned, of course. That seems to be a focal point here.
Posted by BananaPhilosopher 3 years ago
BananaPhilosopher
Post this again with me as con, and I'll take the con position. I do ask that the resolution is altered slightly though.. It's not exactly fair.
All pro has to do is prove you don't always have one OR the other.
Con has to prove you always have both.
The odds are clearly in pro's favor here. All I want altered is this: That the statement "People always have conscience and reason; it is not learned." be changed to "Mental disorders excluded, people always have conscience and reason."
Posted by OliveJuice 3 years ago
OliveJuice
ZebramZee,

Creative thought is extremely fascinating and I love the idea that you have presented. That sounds very possible and would be a great topic for debate. However, there is nothing in front of me to guarantee that you are correct and that a conscience does not exist. Also, there is still the aspect of reasoning. For the sake of this debate, the idea is irrelevant; therefore, we will ignore this possibility and hold the belief that a conscience does exist.

Thank you for your comment!
Posted by ZebramZee 3 years ago
ZebramZee
I would argue that there is no such thing as a 'conscience', that what we call the 'conscience' doesn't actually fit the definition. Thus, it cannot be learned because it doesn't even exist.
2 votes have been placed for this debate. Showing 1 through 2 records.
Vote Placed by ESocialBookworm 3 years ago
ESocialBookworm
OliveJuiceBroaderPerspectiveTied
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Total points awarded:10 
Reasons for voting decision: FF
Vote Placed by BananaPhilosopher 3 years ago
BananaPhilosopher
OliveJuiceBroaderPerspectiveTied
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Total points awarded:70 
Reasons for voting decision: Con didn't defend his position at all, and presented no contentions for Pro to address, so pro wins by default. I do, however, think the resolution was a little murky.. Some would argue you innately have conscience, but not reason. The two aren't very closely correlated.. I had to wonder why they were connected to one another, as though one is tied to the other, when, in my opinion, this isn't the case. Just my two cents.