The Instigator
AndreaW
Con (against)
Losing
0 Points
The Contender
ruiran0326
Pro (for)
Winning
5 Points

Athletic Collegiate Players Should Be Paid

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Post Voting Period
The voting period for this debate has ended.
after 2 votes the winner is...
ruiran0326
Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 11/16/2013 Category: Sports
Updated: 3 years ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 817 times Debate No: 40676
Debate Rounds (3)
Comments (1)
Votes (2)

 

AndreaW

Con

Athletic collegiate players would be any student enrolled in any of the participating NCAA programs at colleges, playing any sport.
If a college refuses to pay their athletic students, athletes will not be able to participate in any qualifying collegiate athletic competition.
NCAA Administration will be in charge of enforcing this law.

College athletes should not be paid. It's the same as high school. Just a higher level. They don't pay you in high school to play sports, why should you get paid in college? You're not a professional athlete just yet. You're still in school. It's not your job. It's a side hobby for the time being in college.
ruiran0326

Pro

I accept your debate, and I look forward to an enlightening debate.

First of all, by arguing the con side of this topic, you are propagating the idea that athletic collegiate players should not be paid. Keeping this idea in mind, I do not understand why you are including the statement that “if a college refuses to pay their athletic students, athletes will not be able to participate in any qualifying collegiate athletic competition” in your con argument. Clearly, those eager college athletes participate in college athletics largely for that competitive atmosphere, and paying them will allow them to compete and fulfill their dreams. Therefore, you are supporting the proposition.

You also state that college athletics are simply a “side hobby.” Quite on the contrary, as I will elaborate on later in this debate, college athletes devote much of their time and well-being to their sport. In the process, they drive a large amount of revenue for their schools. The institutions are plenty able to reimburse their athletes for their dedication, without which their teams would not exist; however, they do not. This is utterly immoral.

Lastly, I would like to state that, contrary to your argument, high school and college athletics are far from being the same thing. However, college and professional athletics are indeed exactly the same, except for the fact that professionals are paid and collegiate players are not. I will be explaining further in my second round argument.

I would like to clarify that as college athletic scholarships given by the NCAA barely cover the necessities of college life and leave plenty of expenses for the athletes to pay out-of-pocket, they do not qualify as payment for those hardworking collegiate athletes and cannot be used in an argument along the lines of “college athletes are already compensated through their scholarships and do not merit additional earnings.” In this debate, “payment” is hereby defined as “monetary compensation, outside of scholarships, provided to collegiate athletes.”

I have three main contentions:

1. College athletes should be reimbursed for generating revenue for their schools,
2. College athletes sustain injuries on behalf of their schools and deserve compensation, and
3. College athletes should receive the money that rightfully belongs to them.

I will be elaborating on each in the next round, and look forward to your response.
Debate Round No. 1
AndreaW

Con

AndreaW forfeited this round.
ruiran0326

Pro

As you have forfeited your round, I assume that you agree with my points, which are that:
1. College athletes sustain injuries on behalf of their schools and deserve compensation, and
2. College athletes should receive the money that rightfully belongs to them.
My first contention as stated in the first round will be supported by my original second and third contentions.
I will continue to elaborate.

1. College athletes sustain injuries on behalf of their schools and deserve compensation.
For males, concussions at all levels of football are a tremendous problem. Among college football players, 30 percent have had two or more. As the University of Pittsburgh’s Department of Neurological Surgery reports, death is highly possible if one has two concussions in a small time frame. A total of 26 deaths since the year 2000 are attributed to this. The neurological effects of concussions in college athletes also can result in learning disabilities and severe memory impairments. Females, on the other hand, are liable to receive ligament tears in the knees, which are costly to repair. Also, cheerleading is by far the most dangerous sport for girls – it accounts for 70.5 percent of fatal, disabling, or serious injuries. If these young adults are willing to run such high risks to play a sport for their school, shouldn’t they be paid a satisfactory sum of money for their ardent devotion?

2. College athletes should receive the money that rightfully belongs to them.
Many times, colleges who have good athletes playing for them attempt to attract more fans by selling them collectibles, jerseys, t-shirts, and autographed items. Even though most of the products have the athlete’s own signature or name on it, the athlete does not receive any money. According to USA Today, athletes are being scammed as they do not receive a single share of the revenue derived from jerseys, equipment, and autographs sold by colleges that recognize them in any sort of way. These athletes deserve the money as their fans are the ones who are buying the products. Most fans only buy the products because their favorite player is embossed right on them. Also, the Forbes magazine of 2012 states that college athletes filed a lawsuit concerning the likeness of players in the new game NCAA Football. They argued that the players have all rights to their own personality and features and should have compensation for the use of their likenesses in this video game. The San Francisco District Court supported the athletes. This simply proves that college athletes are not getting the money that rightfully belongs to them. Not only are their personalities and likenesses being used, but jerseys and autographs are being sold with the athletes’ names on them, and the athletes aren’t receiving any money at all. All this money only goes to the colleges. This is unjustified!

I look forward to your response.
Debate Round No. 2
AndreaW

Con

AndreaW forfeited this round.
ruiran0326

Pro

Once again, as you have forfeited, I assume that you agree with my points.
My case is closed. Thank you for the debate.
Debate Round No. 3
1 comment has been posted on this debate.
Posted by Ore_Ele 3 years ago
Ore_Ele
Change the time to argue to 72 hours per round and I will accept. I would also prefer a longer voting period, but that is not as important.
2 votes have been placed for this debate. Showing 1 through 2 records.
Vote Placed by Ragnar 3 years ago
Ragnar
AndreaWruiran0326Tied
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Total points awarded:01 
Reasons for voting decision: forfeit.
Vote Placed by birdlandmemories 3 years ago
birdlandmemories
AndreaWruiran0326Tied
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Total points awarded:04 
Reasons for voting decision: Forfeit