The Instigator
shadae
Pro (for)
Tied
0 Points
The Contender
PaigeC
Con (against)
Tied
0 Points

Australia Day should be changed.

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Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 6/1/2016 Category: Society
Updated: 11 months ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 305 times Debate No: 92174
Debate Rounds (3)
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Votes (0)

 

shadae

Pro

I strongly believe that Australia Day should be moved. On the 26th of January we all celebrate the day that was once called the "First Landing" or "Foundation Day" when now it is reflected as the day of "mourning" by Aboriginal people. The main reason this statement has been argued over for many, many years is because of the suffering and pain that endured on Australia day. The history of our beautiful country is still remembered and treasured by all of us because we are proud of who we are and of how our country became. But this does not mean the same to all of the population of Australia as on that day in 1788, the Indigenous ancestors of our country were slaughtered, raped and abused severely. If you wouldn't celebrate this day if it was caused to your ancestors, then why should they?
PaigeC

Con

I strongly believe that Australia day should stay on the 26th of Jan because its the day that Australia started to become a country. When the first fell arrived they were attack with weapons that belongs to the Aborigines. They had to defend themselves. You also need to keep in mind they they did not speak the same language, they had no way to compromise with the situation. When they British were attacked by the aborigines, do you expect them to just stand still and get shot or killed? or would you want them to defend themselves? They started Australia, we are the way we are today because of them. They made us a country.
Debate Round No. 1
shadae

Pro

Your argument is acceptable but not true as you are stating what happened when really we are talking about why it should be changed. The points you have explained are mainly about 'defence' but it doesn't benefit your side of the statement as aboriginals were invaded and had to survive. A 'war' was introduced between the two enemies, how does this make the date acceptable to celebrate Australia? . A date that is suitable to be Australia Day is the 23rd of December. The Immigration Restriction Act that occurred in 1901 and is referred to as the "White Australian Policy". This is the day when our country welcomed non-white immigrants, making it a much better date than the 26th as it brings more pride into being Australian and living in Australia. This would make more sense and show Australia as a whole community that can celebrate the day together, rather than what we see now. Which is a feud between the people in our own country that happens on the same day over the same problem.
PaigeC

Con

Today, we have a day specialised to apologise for everything we have done to them. We have offered them a home; we have offered food and shelter, they have the rights to vote, they are treated as equals, yet they don"t believe we are trying to fix anything. They have said no to everything. Here we are as Australians, apologising, trying to make everything right when they are complaining about everything we have done. Why should we walk the extra mile, when the Aboriginals wont even take the first couple of steps? How are we supposed to improve the situation when they expect us to walk in the dark to find a solution that they wont be happy with? Although you said that the date should be changed because of the 'white Australian policies,' some people today still do believe in that law. What good will it do? If we were to change the date, what meaning would it have? You want to change it to the day to when the 'white Australian policy' ended, the problem is, its still going.
Debate Round No. 2
shadae

Pro

Why not celebrate a significant day that represents Australia as a more accepting community? Not many people even know what really happened on the 26th and think of it as a "day off" where they can gather with their mates and have a good time. So what difference does it make if we change the date? We can still do what we do today when celebrating Australia Day, but instead of having our Indigenous people upset and people arguing over this topic. We can be proud and reflect on what a great country we are. If we change the date it shows that us Australians want our country to be a better country. Our development towards treatment of aboriginals, asylum seekers, homeless unemployed, prisoners, women and veterans are not very impressive but once we make these changes we can create a better environment and society for Australia. Lets celebrate the wonders of the country rather than being reminded of the negatives, January the 26th should be remembered but not celebrated.
PaigeC

Con

We are here today as AUSTRALIANS, we are one colony, we are one country. We are here today apologising for things that the BRITISH did. That has to mean something to then. We have done nothing wrong, yet were here apologising, we are using our time to offer the aboriginals peace offerings. When the first fleet arrived, they had different laws to the Aboriginals, and as I mentioned before they did not understand one another. When you say to celebrate Australia day on a more meaningful day, what day would that be? You could change it to June the 7th, what significance would that day have? This date makes our country stronger, it shows the battles of the British and the Aboriginals. The effort Australians have put towards aboriginals is large and the respect we show today gives others a great view on us. The 26th of January should be the date we celebrate Australia and being Australian, this involves all of our history and cultures together as one.
Debate Round No. 3
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