The Instigator
wmpeebles
Pro (for)
Winning
20 Points
The Contender
XStrikeX
Con (against)
Losing
15 Points

Beekeeping should be allowed in suburban neighborhoods

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Post Voting Period
The voting period for this debate has ended.
after 5 votes the winner is...
wmpeebles
Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 7/17/2010 Category: Science
Updated: 6 years ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 2,882 times Debate No: 12562
Debate Rounds (3)
Comments (9)
Votes (5)

 

wmpeebles

Pro

Definitions:
Beekeeping - 1. The management and maintenance of colonies of honeybees. 2. The cultivation of bees on a commercial scale for the production of honey.
Beehive - the box in which beekeepers keep colonies of honeybees.

Honeybees in the suburbs are sometimes not allowed by neighborhood associations due to the misconception that there will be an elevated risk of being stung. However, The actual risk of being stung as a neighbor of one of these hives is slim unless you go over to the hive and provoke the nest. Honeybees sting as a response to defend their nest because of the food they have stored and the several thousand of young honeybees growing inside that will replace dying bees. But bees should not sting when foraging for flowers or gathering nectar because there is nothing to defend (1). Thus, the beekeeper is the only person with the risk of being stung by bees because he is the one that will be messing around with the hive.

Honeybees would in reality be better pets than cats or dogs. Bees can't cuddle up with you and you can't rub their tummy, but introducing honeybees in the suburbs would increase biodiversity among plants in the area and will result in increased yields in garden crops. Also, honeybees provide many personal benefits to the beekeeper and anyone else who consumes the honey made by the hive (2).

Cats and dogs, while seemingly harmless, can be quite a nuisance and a risk as well. Bees don't bark at night and wake people up, bees aren't aggressive if the hive is maintained, bees don't go to the restroom and leave surprises in the neighbor's yard, bees don't run away prompting owners to put up trashy did-you-see-my-cat-fluffy? signs on stop signs throughout the neighborhood, bees don't rip up trash bags due for pickup.

Overall, allowing homeowners in the suburbs to keep beehives provides many benefits to the environment and the neighborhood and is just as or less risky and less of a nuisance than pet dogs and cats to the rest of the neighborhood. It really just depends on how responsible the owners are.

Sources:
1. O'Toole, Christopher, and Anthony Raw. Bees of the World. New York: Facts on File, 1991. Print.
2. http://www.backyardhive.com...
XStrikeX

Con

Thanks to my opponent for coming up with a debate that sounds pretty fun and interesting.
I agree to the definitions and will begin my refutations, and then move on to my arguments.
I am stating that "Beekeeping should not be allowed in suburban neighborhoods."

"However, The actual risk of being stung as a neighbor of one of these hives is slim unless you go over to the hive and provoke the nest."

And beekeeping, as we all should know, is all about going to their nest, provoking it, and taking their honey. There is no fine means of extracting honey from a hive besides actually making solid, physical contact with the bees and forcefully taking their hard-earned honey.

"Honeybees would in reality be better pets than cats or dogs."

That's quite ridiculous, as bees are undomesticated BUGS that hurt you, defecate just like a regular animal (personal experience), and they make an irritating buzz and drone throughout the entire day! Compare that to occasional barks from a dog and the actually pleasant meow and purr of a cat. Ever heard of the vuvuzuela horns from the World Cup? Many people think those are extremely annoying and they compare them to the sound of a bee. Bees are solitary creatures that you can't take on a walk through the park, or make contact with it. Could you imagine a person holding a little bee that is buzzing, defecating, and not doing anything? Clearly, this point makes absolutely no sense and that is why we have cats and dogs as pets and not bees.

"...introducing honeybees in the suburbs would increase biodiversity among plants in the area and will result in increased yields in garden crops. Also, honeybees provide many personal benefits to the beekeeper and anyone else who consumes the honey made by the hive (2)."

Honeybees are already in the suburbs, flying from one plant to the next, pollinating it and spreading the pollen. They're already here and they've been here for an extremely long time. Just take a step outside and you should be able to see the bees. A suburb is a residential area near or in a city [1]. The benefits you talk about are already here.
My opponent also noted that there will be benefits to the beekeeper. That's only at the cost of the bees who spend a lot of time making honey. They use honey during the winter to survive and feed their future workers. And beekeeping is not much of a profit. It's very hard to turn beekeeping into an actual job with a sustained amount of monetary gain [2].

Seeing as my opponent's arguments are refuted, I will move on to my own points.

1. People will think beekeeping is too easy [3].
Many are uneducated about bees and believe that beekeeping is extremely easy. Sometimes it may be so, however, this can lead to false discretion. Because so many people hear that taking honey is easy, they become overconfident and occasionally, ignorant, and take very little precaution. Without precaution, the bees will defend their own hive, resulting in casualties for the poor, confused keeper. You also need refined gear to protect yourself from the bee stings and that's hard to come by.

2. Lack of focus on real economical development [4].
Beekeeping, according to many, is a hobby and fun. Don't get me wrong, having fun is a good thing. But one fear is that people will become addicted to this "fun hobby" and won't focus much on their own job, the job that produces technology, inspires new ideas, and truly helps our economy, whereas beekeeping is just one trade that can't progress any further and makes little profit, as I previously proved in my rebuttal.

3. It can really tick off neighbors.
As I previously said, the drone and the buzzing of thousands of bees bunched together is extremely irritating and certainly not music to your ears. How would a person take many bees home? He or she would steal the bees and force them home. The neighbors would dislike you due to the sound, and the ladies in the houses would probably be disgusted at the sight of the bugs, as most women are.

4. Stressful and hard [5].
Those who do not find beekeeping fun, will find it totally impossible. If you read article number 5 in my sources, it shows there are many steps to ensure your bees are happy and will produce honey. You need to build a fence to provide wind protection and so that a bee doesn't smack you in the head. You need a constant source of water and most bees love small creeks and ponds, which are hard to recreate. There's the possibility of a swarm and you need to control it and, as the article reads, there is no 100% success with it. Though it reads that the swarm is gentle, just look at the picture on the left. Does that look gentle? Not at all, for it looks like the poor woman will be stung a hundred times. The stress from the beekeeping will certainly turn many off of the subject.

Sources:
1. http://en.wikipedia.org...
2. http://forums.gardenweb.com...
3. http://basicbeekeeping.blogspot.com...
4. http://forums.gardenweb.com...
5. http://outdoorplace.org...

I look further to the next round.
Debate Round No. 1
wmpeebles

Pro

Thank you for accepting the debate. This is my first one, so this will be interesting.

"And beekeeping, as we all should know, is all about going to their nest, provoking it, and taking their honey. There is no fine means of extracting honey from a hive besides actually making solid, physical contact with the bees and forcefully taking their hard-earned honey."

I do not see how your statement refutes mine in Round 1 in any way.

"Honeybees would in reality be better pets than cats or dogs."

By this statement I meant that honeybees are better than cats or dogs because the latter 2 cannot increase natural biodiversity within the ecosystem. It was a mistake to refer to them as pets, but please replace the word "pet" with "animal".

"Honeybees are already in the suburbs, flying from one plant to the next, pollinating it and spreading the pollen. They're already here and they've been here for an extremely long time."

Surely there is biodiversity already in the ecosystem, but my statement was that "introducing honeybees in the suburbs would INCREASE biodiversity among plants." You interpreted it that honeybees would create biodiversity.

"That's only at the cost of the bees who spend a lot of time making honey. They use honey during the winter to survive and feed their future workers."

Yes that's true indeed, but responsible beekeepers should not take all of the honey. They would discover this by researching before they start beekeeping, such as buying a book and reading it.

So far, my points have not been refuted. I will now take on your points.

"Because so many people hear that taking honey is easy, they become overconfident and occasionally, ignorant, and take very little precaution. Without precaution, the bees will defend their own hive, resulting in casualties for the poor, confused keeper."

What casualties will result for the poor, confused keeper? Stings, death? Like I said, beginner beekeepers should research beekeeping before they start. The same is for people who also want to own dogs, cats & other pets. Do you really think that the owners of a Pit Bull that mauled my friend's face in 2007 really knew what they were doing?

"But one fear is that people will become addicted to this "fun hobby" and won't focus much on their own job, the job that produces technology, inspires new ideas, and truly helps our economy"

This is is ridiculous and irrelevant to the debate.

"As I previously said, the drone and the buzzing of thousands of bees bunched together is extremely irritating and certainly not music to your ears."

A beehive is an enclosed structure with usually one hole for the bees to enter and exit. How would the sound be able to exit the hive? And where is a source to back up this claim?

"How would a person take many bees home? He or she would steal the bees and force them home."

There are things called "Package bees". See http://www.honeyflowfarm.com.... The process is illustrated as well. Nobody would be stealing any bees and again I have not found anything that suggests that from the sources you cited.

"You need to build a fence to provide wind protection and so that a bee doesn't smack you in the head."

I actually laughed at this one. But suburban neighborhoods that usually require privacy fences are also usually the only neighborhoods that restrict against beekeeping. Same holds true with farm animals. Suburbs with chain link fences are more relaxed with their rules in general. So the fence problem will be alleviated in the case of suburban neighborhoods that restrict against beekeeping.

"You need a constant source of water and most bees love small creeks and ponds, which are hard to recreate. There's the possibility of a swarm and you need to control it and, as the article reads, there is no 100% success with it. Though it reads that the swarm is gentle, just look at the picture on the left. Does that look gentle? Not at all, for it looks like the poor woman will be stung a hundred times."

Well put out a bowl of water everyday. Dogs & Cats also need water. Bees will use the nearest water source they find and if the bowl of water is there, then they will use it. And so what if bees go to small creeks and ponds. Is that a problem? When honeybees swarm, they normally fly only a few yards away. Increasing the chances of the swarm staying in the beekeeper's yard. When swarming, bees have nothing to defend, so they'll be less likely to sting. Swarms only last for a couple hours anyway before scout bees find a new nesting site (2).

"The stress from the beekeeping will certainly turn many off of the subject."

Your 5th source never mentions stress occurring from beekeeping.

Among the points you brought up, I did not see any that would suggest that beekeeping should be illegal in suburban neighborhoods. Just points that would discourage a hobbyist or a future beekeeper. Some sources you cited did not back up what you were arguing. You didn't really debate anything that would suggest that you are against beekeeping other than the noise issue which I would like a citation for. And since there wasn't much to refute, I will summarize.

1. Introducing honeybees will increase biodiversity in the area (3).
2. Honeybees are more beneficial to the environment & neighborhood than a dog or a cat by pollinating garden crops.
3. The person most at risk of being stung is the beekeeper or anything that messes around with the nest because the bees are trying to protect their honey & their young brood.
4. Bees have no reason to sting when gathering pollen & nectar (2).
5. Dogs can attack people too (4).
6. People will not flee the workforce in masses and try beekeeping.
7. Bees have many requirements just like dogs & cats do.
8. Bees don't make lots of noise that would be of any nuisance.

The bottom line: Beekeeping is no more dangerous than having a pet dog, and is no more of a nuisance of a pet dog and cat and therefore beekeeping should be allowed suburban neighborhoods.

Sources:
1. http://www.honeyflowfarm.com...
2. O'Toole, Christopher, and Anthony Raw. Bees of the World. New York: Facts on File, 1991. Print.
3. http://www.antaisce.org...
4. http://www.dogbitelaw.com...
XStrikeX

Con

Thanks for the response.

My response refutes your first argument because you stated that a bee will not sting you, unless you go provoke its hive. And the only way to extract honey is to make physical contact with the hive and take the honey forcefully.

By your second statement, you just caved in on your own argument, stating that they were not pets, so... it's no longer valid.

"Surely there is biodiversity already in the ecosystem, but my statement was that "introducing honeybees in the suburbs would INCREASE biodiversity among plants." You interpreted it that honeybees would create biodiversity."

This refutation makes absolutely no sense. Of course there's already a biodiversity of plants and flowers. Bees have already been introduced in North America and they're increasing biodiversity and creating some. Allowing people to bee keep will not change this effect, for the bees have already been here. There will be bees in our cities and towns as long as there are nectar and pollen-producing plants. Outlawing beekeeping tends to replace domesticated bees with wild bees, but does not make bees go away [3].

"Yes that's true indeed, but responsible beekeepers should not take all of the honey. They would discover this by researching before they start beekeeping, such as buying a book and reading it."

However, all the articles and pages that are about beekeeping call it so easy. Again, this leads to my point that the beekeeper will become overconfident and possibly careless.

"What casualties will result for the poor, confused keeper? Stings, death? Like I said, beginner beekeepers should research beekeeping before they start. The same is for people who also want to own dogs, cats & other pets. Do you really think that the owners of a Pit Bull that mauled my friend's face in 2007 really knew what they were doing?"

Very sorry for your poor pit bull mauled friend. Anyway, casualties do result in making contact with bees [1]. Those who are allergic to bees can greatly suffer from the sting. Even for those who are not allergic, bee stings can be dangerous [2]. A 39-year-old Arizona man died last week as a result of receiving more than 300 stings from a swarm of Africanized bees, or so-called killer bees. And the Africanized bees have recently begun to move to the southern parts of the United States.

"Well put out a bowl of water everyday. Dogs & Cats also need water."
Stop bringing in pets into this debate. It's completely irrelevant to the topic at hand and unimportant. If you read the article about this argument that I previously and cited again [3], the two successful ways mentioned having nothing to do with leaving a bowl of water out. That would be an extremely ineffective way and not a good way to raise your bees.

"Your 5th source never mentions stress occurring from beekeeping."
Not directly, but I wanted to show some of the pictures of beekeeping and how it was not easy at all. There are many instructions for taking care of a hive of bees and they don't seem very easy. Why was a whole page written about the art of beekeeping? Cause it is clearly not easy.

"Among the points you brought up, I did not see any that would suggest that beekeeping should be illegal in suburban neighborhoods. Just points that would discourage a hobbyist or a future beekeeper."

I made the argument that neighbors will be extremely annoyed. That's why beekeeping should be made illegal so that people can hear themselves think, and if beekeeping was legal, it would immediately be rallied against by neighbors. As I stated, there will also be failure in economical development.

I will now refute the 8 points you listed.

1. Honeybees have already been introduced and already help biodiversity.
2. We're not going to get rid of dogs or cats and you cannot force everyone to keep bees. And they pollinate garden crops and plants anyway, even if we didn't have beekeeping.
3. Um, exactly? People can get hurt, especially the beekeeper, and ignorant children who are playing around the hidden hive.
4. I don't understand your argument.
5. Irrelevant, but I will still refute. A tamed dog can be controlled from biting someone, but bees cannot be controlled or trained or tamed.
6. Not all, but some may find it addicting and not focus on the real economic situation.
7. Again, we are not going to outlaw dogs and cats. And these pets are much more friendly than a bee.
8. Of course they do. They constantly produce a humming sound that can seriously annoy neighbors. Just search "bees are annoying," and you will get plenty of hits.

Now that my opponent's arguments are refuted, I'd like to restate and add a new argument.

1. Bees are annoying and not many want a neighbor with a bunch buzzing around.
2. (New) The queen bee is the leader of the colony who produces more worker bees. Ignorant beekeepers do not take care of their fragile queen, and she dies. In the past years, due to colder weather, many queen bees have died and worker bees cannot fly out and they die due to lack of food. We collect their food (honey) which they need to survive during cold times in winter, and by doing so, we kill off the bees, unknowingly [4].
3. People think beekeeping is easy, become overconfident, and end up with a dead colony.
4. Biodiversity remains even without beekeeping and bees are not the only contributors.
5. Bees are very stressful to take care of.
6. Addiction leads to failure of economic development.
7. Beekeeping = not much profit = bad economy.
8. People get hurt by the stingers.

For these reasons, beekeeping should be illegal in suburban neighborhoods.
I await my opponent's response with excitement.

Sources:
1. http://www.merck.com...
2. http://www.themedguru.com...
3. http://outdoorplace.org...
4. http://www.thedailygreen.com...
Debate Round No. 2
wmpeebles

Pro

Thank you again for your response. Now, continuing on...

Definitions:
Refute - to prove wrong by argument or evidence.

"My response refutes your first argument because you stated that a bee will not sting you, unless you go provoke its hive. And the only way to extract honey is to make physical contact with the hive and take the honey forcefully."

I agree with your statement, but it still does not refute mine. In simpler terms, I said that if you go to the hive and provoke it, you have the possibility of getting stung. If you do not provoke the hive, then you will not get stung. Is that clearer? By using the definition of the word refute above, you did not prove my statement wrong by argument or evidence. It is the beekeeper's choice to bee keep and it is an assumed risk that the beekeeper will get stung. However, the bees are of no risk to neighbors since the neighbors are not extracting the honey.

"This refutation makes absolutely no sense. Of course there's already a biodiversity of plants and flowers. Bees have already been introduced in North America and they're increasing biodiversity and creating some. Allowing people to bee keep will not change this effect, for the bees have already been here. There will be bees in our cities and towns as long as there are nectar and pollen-producing plants. Outlawing beekeeping tends to replace domesticated bees with wild bees, but does not make bees go away [3]."

Aside from the plagiarism in this argument from the source he provided, my opponent fails to realize that there are pests, threats, and diseases among bees and only assumes that bees will always be here if there are nectar and pollen-producing plants. The same case is for any animal. Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD) is a phenomenon in which honeybee colonies lose more than 30% - 90% of their colony at any given time. The cause of this disorder is unknown, but beekeepers worldwide have suffered substantial losses, sometimes entire hives disappear within a matter of weeks [1]. Honeybees are essential to agriculture in the US. In California, the almond crop uses 1.3 million colonies of bees, half of all honey bee colonies in the US. That number was expected to be 1.5 million colonies this year. The demand for honeybees is rising, while the number of honeybee colonies is decreasing [2]. Parasitic Varroa mites feed on body fluids of honeybees and wild feral bees at any age group. Varroa mites also can carry a virus that affect the young brood [3]. Acarine mites feed on the airways of the bees and can also kill entire colonies. The increase in pesticide use has also been associated with dead bees[4]. There are numerous more pests & diseases that have caused honeybee & native feral bee populations to decline as well, just look at source number 3. My opponent's claim that bees will always be here if there are nectar & pollen producing plants is false because he did not consider other factors such as disease and pests. Wild bees are just as susceptible to disease as domesticated bees are.

"However, all the articles and pages that are about beekeeping call it so easy. Again, this leads to my point that the beekeeper will become overconfident and possibly careless."

Not once have you listed a source that has lead to a catastrophe resulting in a mismanaged hive. Beekeeping is not that hard anyway, with one hive you only have to check up on the hive once a few weeks [5]. The articles and pages that call beekeeping easy are probably true, since they have experience in the subject. You're saying beekeeping is hard, yet you aren't experienced in beekeeping.

"Anyway, casualties do result in making contact with bees [1]. Those who are allergic to bees can greatly suffer from the sting. Even for those who are not allergic, bee stings can be dangerous [2]. A 39-year-old Arizona man died last week as a result of receiving more than 300 stings from a swarm of Africanized bees, or so-called killer bees. And the Africanized bees have recently begun to move to the southern parts of the United States."

Those who are knowingly allergic to bee stings should always have epinephrine with them as a precaution because it treats the effects of anaphylactic shock which could otherwise kill a person allergic [6]. Africanized bees are not kept by beekeepers so this irrelevant to the debate.

"...the two successful ways mentioned having nothing to do with leaving a bowl of water out. That would be an extremely ineffective way and not a good way to raise your bees."

Extremely ineffective & not a good way to raise your bees? None of your sources suggest your statement. Keeping a bowl of water is actually recommended by a lot of sources [7][8][9][10]. I have no idea where you're getting your information.

"There are many instructions for taking care of a hive of bees and they don't seem very easy. Why was a whole page written about the art of beekeeping? Cause it is clearly not easy."

Last time I checked, you do not have any experience in beekeeping. How can you say something is hard without trying? Even without experience, not one source you cited suggested that beekeeping is hard.

"I made the argument that neighbors will be extremely annoyed. That's why beekeeping should be made illegal so that people can hear themselves think, and if beekeeping was legal, it would immediately be rallied against by neighbors."

I already refuted this argument in Round 2, yet you did not try to refute me when I said there would not be a lot of noise because bees are enclosed inside a hive, where sound would be muffled by the walls and ceiling. Beekeeping is already legal in a lot of suburbs, yet you fail to provide a source that says that people in these neighborhoods are rallying to make beekeeping illegal. Thus, your statement is false because you have failed to provide evidence.

"They constantly produce a humming sound that can seriously annoy neighbors. Just search "bees are annoying," and you will get plenty of hits."

Vuvuzelas & Carpenter bees have nothing to do with beekeeping, so your statement is irrelevant to this debate.

"As I stated, there will also be failure in economical development."

I am not convinced. Why would there be failure in economical development? If a person chose to leave their job in favor of beekeeping, another person would take their place. Haven't you seen the unemployment rate in this country? Due to the disease problem, beekeeping would actually promote economical development since there will be a need for beekeepers in the future [2].

"In the past years, due to colder weather, many queen bees have died and worker bees cannot fly out and they die due to lack of food."

What does this have to do with the debate? You said queen bees die due to colder weather, not to beekeepers, so this statement is irrelevant to the debate.

I have refuted all of your 8 points in Round 2.

Beekeeping should not be illegal in suburban neighborhoods because of the benefits that I have listed. My opponent failed to show that beekeeping should not be allowed in suburban neighborhoods with any evidence that backs up his claims. I have proved him wrong with evidence from several sources, but the sources he provided did not match up to what he was saying. It is clear that I have made a case for myself and that I should be the winner of this debate. Vote Pro!

Sources:
1. http://maarec.psu.edu...
2. http://www.ars.usda.gov...
3. http://en.wikipedia.org...
4. http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu...
5. http://www.beekeepingsuccess.com...
6. http://www.hmc.psu.edu...
7. http://www.bees-and-beekeeping.com...
8. http://kaufmann-mercantile.com...
9. http://www.ediblecommunities.com...
10. http://charearl.com...
XStrikeX

Con

Time for the final round. I'd like to thank my opponent for this great debate thus far and now would like to begin my last arguments.

"However, the bees are of no risk to neighbors since the neighbors are not extracting the honey."

Well, some innocent young children, including toddlers and babies, do not realize that bees can be harmful and therefore would play with the bee or even try to grab one and stick it in their mouths. Older adults hate the idea of bees flying around everywhere that could be a potential threat to children. Women would try to harm the bees, which is bad for the bees themselves, and in turn, could possibly get stung repeatedly, not just once. Some hives reside in, say, a house's backyard. When adults would try to get rid of the annoying hive, and decide not to become beekeepers, they would provoke the hive and get stung. The stinging effect also has a negative result on the bees, for they die after the provocation [1].

My opponent's next argument gave unnecessary facts and he stated that disease and pests will kill bees. This will not change whether or not people beekeep as there will always be pests and disease, just like bees. There are 20,000 known species of bee and have remained here for a super long time, possibly since the beginning of man. There are 40,000 bees in the peak of a hive, as well. Bees will not die and the pollination of plants will continue at the same rate whether or not there is beekeeping.

"You're saying beekeeping is hard, yet you aren't experienced in beekeeping."

If you're spying on me, you would find that a hive of bees has actually infested my house. We have tried taking care of the bees, yet they buzz and produce an annoying sound, and trying to care of them was a lost attempt. Thus, we blocked them off and sadly, killed a hive of bees. Trying to beekeep and failing would hurt the bees as well. Bees are not easy at all to take care of, and since my opponent has mentioned that I have no source and proceeded with an attack on me by stating "you," this is my evidence that beekeeping is not easy.

"Those who are knowingly allergic to bee stings should always have epinephrine with them as a precaution because it treats the effects of anaphylactic shock which could otherwise kill a person allergic [6]. Africanized bees are not kept by beekeepers so this irrelevant to the debate."

Again, what about a child who is young, ignorant, and does not carry epinephrine? My opponent has not refuted the point that even non-allergic people can die. If, as you say, beekeeping is so easy, wouldn't the common household family beekeep, a family that doesn't know the difference between certain bees? Africanized bees (killer bees) will harm and are hard to tell from a honeybee.

"Extremely ineffective & not a good way to raise your bees? None of your sources suggest your statement. Keeping a bowl of water is actually recommended by a lot of sources [7][8][9][10]."

The seventh source you cited reads that a neighbor was angered because they kept flying to her dog's water bowl. Neighbors will be annoyed with bees flying around. Eight source isn't anything at all. Tenth source can't be found. Bees will always find many sources of water and the water you leave out can be drained.

"Last time I checked, you do not have any experience in beekeeping. How can you say something is hard without trying? Even without experience, not one source you cited suggested that beekeeping is hard."

Not to be rude, but, it would sound like you are stalking me... As I previously mentioned, I do have experience with bees. Here is a source [2]. The title of the article, interestingly enough, is "The Hard Work of a Beekeeper." Also, there is this one [3].

"...I said there would not be a lot of noise because bees are enclosed inside a hive, where sound would be muffled by the walls and ceiling. Beekeeping is already legal in a lot of suburbs, yet you fail to provide a source that says that people in these neighborhoods are rallying to make beekeeping illegal."

Bees do not stay in their hive all the time. The workers venture out of the hive and produce noises and fly around, irritatingly enough. The hive's walls will not block the noise. Imagine thousands of bees, clustered together, making a buzzing sound, that gathers and travels everywhere. He said there are no sources that beekeeping is rallied against by neighbors. The source you previously stated, number 7, had a lady who was so bothered by the bees that she went to talk to the neighbor. Many sites on the web say that bees are annoying due to their sound [4][5][6]. I listed only a few out of the numerous complaints from people. If you cannot find the part about the annoyance, just put in ctrl+f, and then insert, 'annoying.'

"Vuvuzelas & Carpenter bees have nothing to do with beekeeping, so your statement is irrelevant to this debate."

My previous argument was that neighbors will be extremely irritated because of the bees. Many people, while watching the 2010 FIFA World Cup, listened to the vuvuzuela horns, called them extremely annoying, and compared them to bees because they were so annoying. Thus, the argument is relevant.

"I am not convinced. Why would there be failure in economical development? If a person chose to leave their job in favor of beekeeping, another person would take their place. Haven't you seen the unemployment rate in this country? Due to the disease problem, beekeeping would actually promote economical development since there will be a need for beekeepers in the future [2]."

As I previously stated, beekeeping is a horrible paid, full-time job [7]. It would barely help the economy. Beekeeping is addictive and takes away real technological development. The 9.5% of people who are unemployed were the people who were the worst at their jobs and laid off. They would most likely not be as effective at a job as the new, addicted beekeeper.

What does this have to do with the debate? You said queen bees die due to colder weather, not to beekeepers, so this statement is irrelevant to the debate.

The relevance to this debate is that beekeepers harvest the extremely important honey that is kept within the hive. That honey is used throughout the winter for food for the queen and for the workers. When I stated that queen bees die, I meant that they die due to lack of food.

I have refuted all of your refutations from your previous argument.
I will once again list all the arguments for why bekeeeping should not be allowed.

"Beekeeping should not be illegal in suburban neighborhoods because of the benefits that I have listed."
My opponent has listed, I believe, two reasons that I have refuted that are supposed to be benefits.
The first was about bees as pets, which he turned down himself in the Second Round.
The second was about increased biodiversity, which already was refuted, as well. Just look back.

1. Beekeeping harms bees because we take away the precious honey they need for winter.
2. Makes very little money to help the economy.
3. Neighbors are annoyed by bees.
4. Bees harm young children, bees themselves because people kill them, and adults who want to get rid of bees.
5. All opponent's points refuted, while mine are still intact.
6. Beekeeping is not an easy trade and creates stress.

For these reasons, I urge an opposition vote.

This was a wonderful debate and I thank my opponent because of this.
Thank you for reading.

Sources:
1. http://www.drgreene.com...
2. http://basicbeekeeping.blogspot.com...
3. http://uk.answers.yahoo.com...
4. http://www.wisegeek.com...
5. http://www.about-bees.com...
6. http://www.greenthumbarticles.com...
7. http://www.beesource.com...
Debate Round No. 3
9 comments have been posted on this debate. Showing 1 through 9 records.
Posted by wmpeebles 6 years ago
wmpeebles
I am not joking. I showed my friends how well I did in round three and one of them voted for me. I did not tell anyone to vote for me, it was strictly their decision. You can believe me or not, but you do not have any evidence that shows I voted for my own debate.
Posted by XStrikeX 6 years ago
XStrikeX
You're joking... They just both happen to be 15 year old boys living in the same place in Texas and Rocket828 joined 2 days ago, the same day he voted for you.
Posted by wmpeebles 6 years ago
wmpeebles
Nope, but I think a friend might have voted for me, although I did not tell any of my friends to vote for me. It was strictly their choice.
Posted by XStrikeX 6 years ago
XStrikeX
wmpeebles, did you just make a new account and voted for yourself??
Posted by XStrikeX 6 years ago
XStrikeX
Gee, thanks, wpfairbanks.
Posted by wmpeebles 6 years ago
wmpeebles
I-am-a-panda, I didn't mean for it to be a ploy, just a side note. I've taken it out since more people might not like it.

brian_eggleston, beekeeping is not illegal in all suburban areas, but my neighborhood association especially did not allow it. There is also a decline in the native bee populations of the US as well and by allowing suburban beekeeping the honeybees (or other bees) will make up for decline in the native population. I haven't seen any Africanized bees yet though.
Posted by I-am-a-panda 6 years ago
I-am-a-panda
"Mind you, we don't have those swarming African killer bees that you have in the southern United States!" - But Brian, that would make for epic Bee wars!
Posted by brian_eggleston 6 years ago
brian_eggleston
I didn't realise keeping bees in suburban areas was illegal in the US.

It's certainly not against the law here in England. Indeed, it is actually encouraged because there has been a decline in the natural population.

Furthermore, as England is a nation of keen gardeners, beehives are welcomed in most neighbourhoods.

Mind you, we don't have those swarming African killer bees that you have in the southern United States!
Posted by I-am-a-panda 6 years ago
I-am-a-panda
LOL @ Political ploy at the end of your argument
5 votes have been placed for this debate. Showing 1 through 5 records.
Vote Placed by arethusa668 6 years ago
arethusa668
wmpeeblesXStrikeXTied
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Vote Placed by wjmelements 6 years ago
wjmelements
wmpeeblesXStrikeXTied
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Vote Placed by Rocket828 6 years ago
Rocket828
wmpeeblesXStrikeXTied
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Vote Placed by superdebater 6 years ago
superdebater
wmpeeblesXStrikeXTied
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Vote Placed by wpfairbanks 6 years ago
wpfairbanks
wmpeeblesXStrikeXTied
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