The Instigator
yoda878
Pro (for)
Winning
3 Points
The Contender
TheRecordMaker
Con (against)
Losing
0 Points

Best Oldies songs

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Post Voting Period
The voting period for this debate has ended.
after 1 vote the winner is...
yoda878
Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 5/31/2012 Category: Arts
Updated: 4 years ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 1,423 times Debate No: 23972
Debate Rounds (4)
Comments (0)
Votes (1)

 

yoda878

Pro

Ok first round is acceptance.

Video of Oldies songs... 60's or older.
Remakes are ok as long as the song was wrote in the 60's or later.
If you want to make your own video with the music that's ok but judging should be on the words and music.
TheRecordMaker

Con

I accept.
Debate Round No. 1
yoda878

Pro

Written by The Cascades band member John Claude Gummoe in 1962.

Listen to the rhythm of the falling rain
Telling me just what a fool I've been
I wish that it would go and let me cry in vain
And let me be alone again

The only girl I've ever loved has gone away
Looking for a brand new start
But little does she know
That when she left that day
Along with her she took my heart

Rain please tell me now does that seem fair
For her to steal my heart away when she don't care
I can't love another when my hearts somewhere far away

The only girl I care about has gone away
Looking for a brand new start
But little does she know that when she left that day
Along with her she took my heart

Rain won't you tell her that I love her so
Please ask the sun to set her heart aglow
Rain in her heart and let the love we knew start to grow

Listen to the rhythm of the falling rain
Telling me just what a fool I've been
I wish that it would go and let me cry in vain
And let me be alone again

Oh, listen to the falling rain
Pitter pater, pitter pater
Oh, oh, oh, listen to the falling rain
TheRecordMaker

Con

You know, I don't know who wrote this song. I think it was Carl Smith, because most people credit the song as his, and the fact that the song sung by him reached number 43 on the pop chart in 1959.

Anyway, I think Carl Smith wrote it in 1959. But Mel Tillis also recorded the song in the same year. I like his version just a little better than Smith's.

As for the video square, sorry, but I couldn't find this song alone on youtube written by Tillis. But I did find a recording of the album that the song is on. So, the album recording is the recording the song is on. For you and the voters, the song is from 7:16 to 9:32.

This is Mel Tillis's version of Carl Smith's original of "Ten Thousand Drums".

Waitin', waitin', for the Redcoats to come
But all I hear in my frozen ear is ten thousand drums, ten thousand drums
Johnny, Johnny, don't be afraid
We can whip those Redcoats sittin' in the shade, sittin' in the shade
We've got the best of all the rest in General Washington
And when we meet those Redcoats, watch those Redcoats run
Throwin' down their drums, throwin' down their drums

Listen, listen, Johnny better get your gun
'Cause that ain't wooden soldiers behind ten thousand drums, behind ten thousand drums
Runnin', runnin', Johnny watch them run
We finally whipped those Redcoats, finally stopped those drums, we stopped ten thousand drums
We're the best of all the rest us Yankee son of a gun, and we can tell our mammy how we made 'em run blowin' down their drums, blowin down their drums
Ten thousand drums, ten thousand drums, ten thousand drums
Debate Round No. 2
yoda878

Pro

Verry nice song to con, it brings to mind another battle song that hit top charts in 59. I think this one is even better lets see what you guys think.

Horton's recording of "The Battle of New Orleans" stayed on top of the country singles chart for ten weeks in 1959 and also held the top spot on the pop charts for six weeks. Partially because of his notoriety for this song, Driftwood was asked to perform his traditional American music for Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev during his visit to the United Nations in 1959. Driftwood and Horton took Song of the Year honors at the second Grammy awards ceremony in 1959

BATTLE OF NEW ORLEANS
(Written by Jimmy Driftwood)
Johnny Horton

In 1814, we took a little trip
Along with Colonel Jackson down the mighty Mississip'.
We took a little bacon and we took a little beans
And we caught the bloody British in a town in New Orleans.

We fired our guns and the British kept a-coming
There wasn't nigh as many as there was a while ago.
We fired once more, and they began to running,
On down the Mississippi to the Gulf of Mexico.

We looked down the river and we see'd the British come
and there musta' been a hundred of 'em beating on the drum.
They stepped so high and they made their bugles ring
We stood beside our cotton bales and didn't say a thing.

We fired our guns, and the British kept a-coming
There wasn't nigh as many as there was a while ago.
We fired once more and they began to running,
On down the Mississippi to the Gulf of Mexico.

Ole Hickory said we could take 'em by surprise
If we didn't fire our muskets 'till we look 'em in the eyes.
We held our fire 'til we seen their faces swell
Then we opened up our squirrel guns and really gave 'em... Well..

We fired our guns, and the British kept a-coming
There wasn't nigh as many as there was a while ago.
We fired once more and they began to running,
On down the Mississippi to the Gulf of Mexico.

Well they ran through the briars, and they ran through the brambles
And they ran through the bushes where a rabbit couldn't go.
They ran so fast that the hounds couldn't catch 'em
On down the Mississippi to the Gulf of Mexico.

We fired our cannon 'til the barrel melted down
So we grabbed an alligator and we fought another round.
We filled his head with cannon balls and powdered his behind,
And when we touched the powder off, the gator lost his mind.

We fired our guns and the British kept a-coming
There wasn't nigh as many as there was a while ago.
We fired once more and they began to running,
On down the Mississippi to the Gulf of Mexico.

Well they ran through the briars and they ran through the brambles
And they ran through the bushes where a rabbit couldn't go.
They ran so fast that the hounds couldn't catch 'em
On down the Mississippi to the Gulf of Mexico.

hup, two, three, four.
sound, off, three, four.
hup, two, three, four.
TheRecordMaker

Con

Wow. I must give it to pro, that is one of my favorite songs. But I have a song also by Johnny Horton that I find a little better. Unfortunately, the song was recorded by Horton, but never published into an album. Of all the songs made by Horton (and I like almost all of them), this one is my favorite.

This is Johnny Horton's Battle of Bull Run

The sun shown bright and clear that day
We all left Washington
To lick the Rebel boys in grey
At the Battle of Bull Run
They came from Pennsylvania and some from Maryland
To see the Rebel boys get spanked by Honest Abe's broad hand

We said we'll run 'em to Atlanta and to Galveston Bay
But they ran us back to Washington and Philadelphia
And Philadelphia

The ladies wore their brightest shawls
The gentlemen were gay
They came to see their Yankee boys whip old Virginia
I held my momma's hand and skipped
When a soldier said to me
Would you rather have Jeff Davis' hat or the sword of Bobbie Lee
We said we'll run 'em to Atlanta and to Galveston Bay
But they ran us back to Washington and Philadelphia
And Philadelphia

And then the general doffed his hat and said let's rest a spell
And for the first time we all heard that awful rebel yell
The waters of Manassas creek became a ruby red
And many a Reb and Yankee boy lay in the willows dead

We said we'll run 'em to Atlanta and to Galveston Bay
But they ran us back to Washington and Philadelphia
And Philadelphia

A fight locked in the chest of time too horrible to tell
Virginny's true green countryside became a lake of hell
Don't count your chicks before they're hatched
Or you'll work until it's done
Remember yes remember long the Battle of Bull Run

We said we'll run 'em to Atlanta and to Galveston Bay
But they ran us back to Washington and Philadelphia
And Philadelphia
Debate Round No. 3
yoda878

Pro

That's very good con; now I'm going to post a funny one for my last song, hope y'all enjoy!!

"Wake Up Little Susie" is a popular song written by Felice and Boudleaux Bryant and published in 1957.
The song is written from the point of view of a high school boy to his girlfriend, Susie. In the song, the two go out on a date to a drive-in movie theater, only to fall asleep during the movie. They do not wake up until 4 o'clock in the morning, well after the 10 o'clock curfew. They then contemplate the reactions of her parents and their friends
http://en.wikipedia.org...

Wake up, little Susie, wake up
Wake up, little Susie, wake up
We've both been sound asleep, wake up, little Susie, and weep
The movie's over, it's four o'clock, and we're in trouble deep
Wake up little Susie
Wake up little Susie, well

Whatta we gonna tell your mama
Whatta we gonna tell your pa
Whatta we gonna tell our friends when they say "ooh-la-la"
Wake up little Susie
Wake up little Susie, well

I told your mama that you'd be in by ten
Well Susie baby looks like we goofed again
Wake up little Susie
Wake up little Susie, we gotta go home

Wake up, little Susie, wake up
Wake up, little Susie, wake up
The movie wasn't so hot, it didn't have much of a plot
We fell asleep, our goose is cooked, our reputation is shot
Wake up little Susie
Wake up little Susie, well

Whatta we gonna tell your mama
Whatta we gonna tell your pa
Whatta we gonna tell our friends when they say "ooh-la-la"
Wake up little Susie
Wake up little Susie
Wake up little Susie
TheRecordMaker

Con

I guess I'm going to have to have a happy song, so here it is. Its Marty Robbins! The great western singer. This song is happy and a witty reminder to give everyone a chance.

This is Marty Robbins's Cowboy in a Continental Suit

Well, he walks out in the arena
All dressed up to the brim
Said he'd just came down from a place
Called 'Highland Rim'

Well, he said he came to ride the horse
The one they call 'The Brute'
But he didn't look like a cowboy
In his Continental Suit

We snickered at the way he dressed
But he never said a word
He walks on by the rest of us
As if he hadn't heard

A thousand bucks went to the man
Who could ride this wild cayuse
A meaner horse was never born
Than the one they called 'The Brute'

The horse that he was looking for
Was in chute number eight
He walked up very slowly
Put his hand upon the gate

We knew he was a thoroughbred
When he pulled his sack of 'Dukes'
From the inside pocket
Of his Continental Suit

Well, he rolled hisself a 'Corley'
And he lit it standing there
Blew himself a smoke ring
And he watched it disappear

We thought he must be crazy
When he opened up the gate
Standing just inside was
Fifteen hundred pounds of hate

The Buckskin tried to run him down
But the stranger was too quick
He stepped aside and threw his arms
Around the horse's neck

And pulled himself up on the back
Of the horse they called 'The Brute'
Sit like he was born there
In his Continental Suit

'The Brute's' hind-end was in the air
His front end on the ground
Kickin' and a-squealin', tryin' to
Shake this stranger down

But the stranger didn't give an inch
He came to ride 'The Brute'
And he came to ride the
Buckskin In a Continental Suit

Well, I turned around to look at
Jim And he was watchin' me
He said, "I don't believe
The crazy things I think I see"

"But I think I see the outlaw
The one they call 'The Brute'
Ridden by a cowboy
In a Continental Suit"

'The Brute' came to a stand-still
Ashamed that he'd been rode
By a city cowboy in
Some Continental clothes

The stranger took his money
And we don't know where he went
We don't know where he came from
And we haven't seen him since

The moral of this story
Never judge by what they wear
Underneath some ragged clothes
Could be a millionaire

Everybody listen
Don't be fooled by this galoot
This sure 'nough bronc buster
In a Continental Suit
Debate Round No. 4
No comments have been posted on this debate.
1 votes has been placed for this debate.
Vote Placed by TheOrator 4 years ago
TheOrator
yoda878TheRecordMakerTied
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Total points awarded:30 
Reasons for voting decision: The Battle of New Orleans cinched it