The Instigator
16kadams
Pro (for)
Winning
7 Points
The Contender
CAPLlock
Con (against)
Losing
0 Points

Best/most interesting battles in history

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Post Voting Period
The voting period for this debate has ended.
after 2 votes the winner is...
16kadams
Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 12/18/2011 Category: Miscellaneous
Updated: 5 years ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 2,030 times Debate No: 19941
Debate Rounds (5)
Comments (7)
Votes (2)

 

16kadams

Pro

Rules: must post one battle every round with a description. (sources optional)

I choose Verdun. for the first round.
  • 21 February – 18 December 1916, on hilly terrain
  • Verdun resulted in 306,000 battlefield deaths (163,000 French and 143,000 German combatants) plus at least half a million wounded, an average of 30,000 deaths for each of the ten months of the battle. It was the longest and one of the most devastating battles in the First World War and the history of warfare. Verdun was primarily an artillery battle: a total of about 40 million artillery shells were exchanged, leaving behind millions of overlapping shell craters that are still partly visible. In both France and Germany, Verdun has come to represent the horrors of war
  • look at: http://en.wikipedia.org... ( a picture)
  • Was a siege

So it was the first main artillery battle, a turning point (temporarily) in the first world war, had interesting strategies (if you looked at the map I provided), and was devastating. It is the most interesting battle in WW1, and will forever be remembered.

source:

http://en.wikipedia.org...

Good luck =)

CAPLlock

Con

Battle of Yorktown

American Revolution 1781

1- This battle changed history.
A- A newly formed nation had taken down the most powerful nation at that time
B- It led to American indepence.

'Nuff said.
Debate Round No. 1
16kadams

Pro




  • Battle of Gettysburg

  • Was the turning point in the civil war, helped the Union to victory.

  • was fought July 1–3, 1863

  • The first day othe battle was a Union stalling effort, Buford's cavalry held off superior Confederate forces awaiting the Union troops. The Union Inftry did arrive, but they where forced to retreat the first day to cemetery hill

  • The battle then was a union hook formation on all of the hills near cemetery hill, and the msit famous one little round top.

  • The 20th maine held little round top, and for a longtime against superior confederate soldiers. Once out of ammo, their commander, colonel Chamnerlyn, did bayonet charge and captured hundreds of confederates. That was the most important art of the battle.


Conclusion:

Gettysburg was the turning point in the American civil war. And in my opinion is the most interesting battle of the civil war. For mor info go to:http://en.wikipedia.org...

CAPLlock

Con

Battle of Stalingrad
World War 2 1942-1943

This battle, having over a million deaths, was the turning point of the War. German forces were crushed, along with the German 6th army. The city was in ruin after the battle.
Debate Round No. 2
16kadams

Pro

I like multiple battles from all times so more people can relate, Some people like WW1, civil war, now I will hop to 1066.


The Norman victory at the Battle of Hastings in 1066 was the last successful invasion of England--and the first and only since the Roman conquest a thousand years earlier. Its aftermath established a new feudal order that ensured that England would adopt the political and social traditions of continental Europe, rather than those of Scandinavia. The single battle also gained the country's crown for the Norman leader William. [1]

Prior to the Battle of Hastings, the Vikings ruled Scandinavia, Northern Europe, and much of the British Isles. Areas they did not directly control were still vulnerable to their constant raids. Earlier Viking victories in France had led to intermarriage and the creation of a people who called themselves the Normans. Other Vikings conquered the British Isles and established their own kingdoms. Royal bloodlines ran through the leaders of all of the monarchies, but this did not prevent them from fighting each other.

Claims of crowns and territories reached a state of crisis with the death of Edward the Confessor, the King of England in 1066, who had left no heir. Three men claimed the throne: Harold Godwin, brother-in-law of Edward; William, the Duke of Normandy and a distant relative of Edward's; and King Harald Hardrada of Norway, the brother of Harold Godwin.

Both Harald and William assembled armies to sail to England to secure their claims. Godwin decided that William presented more of a threat and moved his English army to the southern coast across from Normandy. Weather, however, delayed William, and King Harald's ten thousand Vikings arrived first. On September 20, the Vikings soundly defeated the local forces around the city of York and seriously weakened the English army in the region.

Hearing of the battle, Godwin turned his army north and covered the two hundred miles to York in only six days. At Stamford Bridge, he surprised the Vikings and soundly defeated them. The retreating Viking survivors filled only twenty-four of the three hundred ships that had brought them to England.

Godwin had inflicted the most decisive defeat on the Vikings in more than two centuries, but there was no time to celebrate. A few days later, he learned that the Normans had landed at Pevensey Bay in Sussex and were marching inland. Godwin hurried back south with his army and on October 1 he arrived in London, where he recruited additional soldiers. On October 13, Godwin moved to Sussex to take defensive positions along the Norman line of march on Senlac Ridge, eight miles northwest of the village of Hastings. He did not have long to prepare because William approached the next day.

Godwin possessed both advantages and disadvantages. He had the advantage of the defense, and his army of 7,000 was about the same size as that of the Normans. Only about 2,000 of his men, however, were professionals. These housecarls, as they were known, wore conical helmets and chain-mail vests and carried five-foot axes in addition to metal shields. The remaining Saxons were poorly trained militiamen known as fyrds, who were basically draftees levied from the shires. Many of the fyrds, and most of the housecarls, were exhausted from their march as well as from the fierce battle with the Vikings.

William's army contained about 2,000 cavalrymen and 5,000 infantrymen, equally armed with swords or bows or crossbows. Despite the lack of numerical superiority and an enemy defense that would only allow for a frontal assault, William attacked.

The Normans advanced behind a rain of arrows from their archers, but the Saxon shields turned aside most of the missiles. Several direct attacks by the infantry fared no better. William then personally led a cavalry charge but was turned back by marshy ground and the Saxon defenses. Defeat, or at best stalemate, appeared to be the outcome of the battle for the invaders. The Normans were further demoralized when a story swept the ranks that William had been killed.

When the Norman leader heard the rumor, he removed his visor and rode to the head of his army. His soldiers, seeing that he was alive, rallied and renewed the assault. William also ordered his archers to fire at a high angle rather than in a direct line in order to reach behind the Saxon shields. The battle remained in doubt until William's cavalry turned and wildly fled from the battlefield. Whether the cavalry was retreating from fright or as a ruse, it had the same results. The Saxons left their defenses to pursue, only to be struck by the Norman infantry. At about the same time, an arrow hit Godwin in the eye, and he was killed by the advancing infantry. The leaderless Saxons began to flee.

William, soon to be known as the Conqueror, pursued the retreating Saxons and seized Dover. With little resistance, he entered London on December 25, 1066, and received the crown of England as King William I. Over the next five years, William brutally put down several rebellions and replaced the Anglo-Saxon aristocracy with his own Norman followers. Norman nobles built castles from which to rule and defend the countryside. Norman law, customs, traditions, and citizens intermingled with the Saxons to form the future of England as a nation.

Later the adage would declare, "There'll always be an England." The fact remains that the England that eventually came to exist began on the Hastings battlefield, and 1066 became a schoolbook standard marking the expansion of English culture, colonization, and influence around the world. [1]

I liked this battle, and it is complicated So I posted it.

http://www.historyplace.com...

Although this ranks the battle 2 out of the best 10 battles, in my opinion its the bes so far. 3 armies, 1 country, 1 victor, and changed englands language, culture, fighting styles, royal family, and shaped their whole history from that point. If the Normans never did that the english language would be different (the normans mixed their language in) and history as we know it would be different. This battle will be remembered...forever,

CAPLlock

Con

CAPLlock forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 3
16kadams

Pro

You have forfeited, therefore breaking the post one battle every round rule, therefore I win. But I will post a battle so I don't break the rules.

Operation market Garden:

Operation Market Garden (17–25 September 1944) was an unsuccessful Allied military operation, fought in the Netherlands and Germany in the Second World War. It was the largest airborne operation up to that time.

Field Marshal Montgomery's goal was to force an entry into Germany and over the Rhine. He wanted to circumvent the northern end of the Siegfried Line and this required the operation to seize the bridges across the Maas (Meuse River) and two arms of the Rhine (the Waal and the Lower Rhine) as well as several smaller canals and tributaries. Crossing the Lower Rhine would allow the Allies to encircle Germany's industrial heartland in the Ruhr from the north. It made large-scale use of airborne forces, whose tactical objectives were to secure the bridges and allow a rapid advance by armored units into Northern Germany.

Initially, the operation was marginally successful and several bridges between Eindhoven and Nijmegen were captured. However, Gen. Horrocks' XXX Corps ground force's advance was delayed by the demolition of a bridge over the Wilhelmina Canal, as well as an extremely overstretched supply line, at Son, delaying the capture of the main road bridge over the Meuse until 20 September. At Arnhem, the British 1st Airborne Division encountered far stronger resistance than anticipated. In the ensuing battle, only a small force managed to hold one end of the Arnhem road bridge and after the ground forces failed to relieve them, they were overrun on 21 September. The rest of the division, trapped in a small pocket west of the bridge, had to be evacuated on 25 September. The Allies had failed to cross the Rhine in sufficient force and the river remained a barrier to their advance until the offensives at Remagen, Oppenheim, Rees and Wesel in March 1945. The failure of Market Garden ended Allied expectations of finishing the war by Christmas 1944.

Although an allied defeat, it was very interesting battle.

http://en.wikipedia.org...
CAPLlock

Con

CAPLlock forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 4
16kadams

Pro

broke the rules twice, I deserve conduct.

Waterloo:
The Battle of Waterloo was fought on Sunday 18 June 1815 near Waterloo in present-day Belgium, then part of the United Kingdom of the Netherlands. An Imperial French army under the command of Emperor Napoleon was defeated by combined armies of the Seventh Coalition, an Anglo-Allied army under the command of the Duke of Wellington combined with a Prussian army under the command of Gebhard von Bl�cher. It was the culminating battle of the Waterloo Campaign and Napoleon's last. The defeat at Waterloo put an end to Napoleon's rule as Emperor of the French and marked the end of his Hundred Days return from exile. [1]

Upon Napoleon's return to power in 1815, many states that had opposed him formed the Seventh Coalition and began to mobilise armies. Two large forces under Wellington and von Bl�cher assembled close to the north-eastern border of France. Napoleon chose to attack in the hope of destroying them before they could join in a coordinated invasion of France with other members of the coalition. The decisive engagement of this three-day Waterloo Campaign (16–19 June 1815) occurred at the Battle of Waterloo. According to Wellington, the battle was "the nearest-run thing you ever saw in your life."[5]

Napoleon delayed giving battle until noon on 18 June to allow the ground to dry. Wellington's army, positioned across the Brussels road on the Mont-Saint-Jean escarpment, withstood repeated attacks by the French, until, in the evening, the Prussians arrived in force and broke through Napoleon's right flank. At that moment, Wellington's Anglo-Allied army counter-attacked and drove the French army in disorder from the field. Pursuing coalition forces entered France and restored Louis XVIII to the French throne. Napoleon abdicated, surrendered to the British, and was exiled to Saint Helena, where he died in 1821.[1]

The battlefield is in present-day Belgium, about 8 miles (13 km) south by south-east of Brussels, and about 1 mile (1.6 km) from the town of Waterloo. The site of the battlefield is today dominated by a large monument, the Lion Mound. As this mound used earth from the battlefield itself, the original topography of the part of the battlefield around the mound has not been preserved.[1]

French strength: 72,000men

Allied strength: 118,000 men.

casualties:

French: 48,000
Allied: 24,000

Total: 72,000

Conclusion:

I deserve conduct because of the FF and rule breaking. I deserve arguments because i have more and better battles and explanations. And I deserve sources as I actually have some. And even If you post so next round I still had more.

Source:
http://en.wikipedia.org... [1]
CAPLlock

Con

CAPLlock forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 5
7 comments have been posted on this debate. Showing 1 through 7 records.
Posted by CAPLlock 5 years ago
CAPLlock
Shi1!
Posted by 16kadams 5 years ago
16kadams
what ? darlek?
Posted by Thesilence 5 years ago
Thesilence
How about the last time war?? Darleks all around!
Posted by 16kadams 5 years ago
16kadams
@ Historygenius

ok thanks
Posted by 1Historygenius 5 years ago
1Historygenius
@16kadams and its of cool that you asked me before actually doing this debate! Trust me I wouldn't care, but I am glad you told me anyway because this will be very interesting.
Posted by 1Historygenius 5 years ago
1Historygenius
@16kadams and its of cool that you asked me before actually doing this debate! Trust me I wouldn't care, but I am glad you told me anyway because this will be very interesting.
Posted by imabench 5 years ago
imabench
This is gonna be goooooooooooooooooooooood :D
2 votes have been placed for this debate. Showing 1 through 2 records.
Vote Placed by ConservativePolitico 5 years ago
ConservativePolitico
16kadamsCAPLlockTied
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Total points awarded:60 
Reasons for voting decision: Con forfeited and provided much less adequet info for each battle than Pro.
Vote Placed by thett3 5 years ago
thett3
16kadamsCAPLlockTied
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Total points awarded:10 
Reasons for voting decision: f