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Buddhism or Shrekism?

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Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 11/14/2016 Category: Religion
Updated: 3 weeks ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 143 times Debate No: 96986
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WUDDA

Pro

George Washington (February 22, 1732 [O.S. February 11, 1731][b][c] " December 14, 1799) was an American soldier and statesman who served as the first President of the United States from 1789 to 1797. During the American Revolutionary War, Washington served as Commander-in-Chief of the Continental Army; as one of the Founding Fathers of the United States, he presided over the convention that drafted the United States Constitution and came to be known as the "father of his country" during his lifetime and to this day.[2]

Washington was widely admired for his strong leadership qualities and was unanimously elected president by the Electoral College in the first two national elections. He oversaw the creation of a strong, well-financed national government that maintained neutrality in the French Revolutionary Wars, suppressed the Whiskey Rebellion, and won acceptance among Americans of all types.[3] Washington's incumbency established many precedents still in use today, such as the cabinet system, the inaugural address, and the title Mr. President.[4][5] His retirement from office after two terms established a tradition that lasted until 1940, when Franklin Delano Roosevelt won an unprecedented third term. The 22nd Amendment (1951) now limits the president to two elected terms.

He was born into the provincial gentry of Colonial Virginia to a family of wealthy planters who owned tobacco plantations and slaves, which he inherited. In his youth, he became a senior officer in the colonial militia during the first stages of the French and Indian War. In 1775, the Second Continental Congress commissioned Washington as commander-in-chief of the Continental Army in the American Revolution. In that command, Washington forced the British out of Boston in 1776, but was defeated and nearly captured later that year when he lost New York City.

After crossing the Delaware River in the middle of winter, he defeated the British in two battles (Trenton and Princeton), retook New Jersey, and restored momentum to the Patriot cause. His strategy enabled Continental forces to capture two major British armies at Saratoga in 1777 and Yorktown in 1781. Historians laud Washington for the selection and supervision of his generals; preservation and command of the army; coordination with the Congress, state governors, and their militia; and attention to supplies, logistics, and training. In battle, however, Washington was repeatedly outmaneuvered by British generals with larger armies.

After victory had been finalized in 1783, Washington resigned as commander-in-chief rather than seize power, proving his opposition to dictatorship and his commitment to American republicanism.[6] Washington presided over the Constitutional Convention in 1787, which devised a new form of federal government for the United States. Following his election as president in 1789, he worked to unify rival factions in the fledgling nation. He supported Alexander Hamilton's programs to satisfy all debts, federal and state, established a permanent seat of government, implemented an effective tax system, and created a national bank.[7] In avoiding war with Great Britain, he guaranteed a decade of peace and profitable trade by securing the Jay Treaty in 1795, despite intense opposition from the Jeffersonians. He remained non-partisan, never joining the Federalist Party, although he largely supported its policies. Washington's Farewell Address was an influential primer on civic virtue, warning against partisanship, sectionalism, and involvement in foreign wars. He retired from the presidency in 1797, returning to his home and plantation at Mount Vernon.

Upon his death, Washington was eulogized as "first in war, first in peace, and first in the hearts of his countrymen" by Henry Lee.[8] He was revered in life and in death; scholarly and public polling consistently ranks him among the top three presidents in American history. He has been depicted and remembered in monuments, currency, and other dedications to the present day.

Contents [hide]
1Early life (1732"1753)
1.1Surveyor
2French and Indian War
2.1Beginnings of War
2.2Braddock disaster 1755
2.3Commander of Virginia Regiment
2.4Lessons learned
3Between the wars: Mount Vernon (1759"1774)
4American Revolution (1775"1783)
4.1Commander in chief
4.2Victory at Boston
4.3Defeat at New York
4.4Crossing the Delaware
4.51777 campaigns
4.6Valley Forge
4.7Sullivan Expedition
4.8Hudson River and Southern battles
4.9Arnold's treason
4.10Victory at Yorktown
4.11Demobilization
5Constitutional Convention
6Presidency (1789"1797)
6.1Domestic issues
6.2Foreign affairs
6.3Farewell Address
7Retirement (1797"1799)
7.1Comparisons with Cincinnatus
8Death
9Personal life
9.1Religion
9.2Freemasonry
9.3Slavery
10Legacy
10.1Papers
10.2Monuments and memorials
10.3Postage and currency
10.4Cherry tree
10.5Personal property auction record
11See also
12Notes
13References
14Bibliography
15External links
Early life (1732"1753)
Further information: Ancestry of George Washington

Washington's birthplace
George Washington was the first child of Augustine Washington (1694"1743) and his second wife Mary Ball Washington (1708"1789), born on their Pope's Creek Estate near present-day Colonial Beach in Westmoreland County, Virginia. He was born on February 11, 1731, according to the Julian calendar and Annunciation Style of enumerating years then in use in the British Empire. The Gregorian calendar was adopted within the British Empire in 1752, and it renders a birth date of February 22, 1732.[9][b][c]

Washington was of primarily English gentry descent, especially from Sulgrave, England. His great-grandfather John Washington emigrated to Virginia in 1656 and began accumulating land and slaves, as did his son Lawrence and his grandson, George's father Augustine. Augustine was a tobacco planter who also tried his hand in iron-mining ventures.[10] In George's youth, the Washingtons were moderately prosperous members of the Virginia gentry, of "middling rank" rather than one of the leading planter families.[11]

Six of George's siblings reached maturity, including older half-brothers Lawrence and Augustine, from his father's first marriage to Jane Butler Washington, and full siblings Samuel, Elizabeth (Betty), John Augustine, and Charles. Three siblings died before adulthood: his full sister Mildred died when she was about one, his half-brother Butler died in infancy, and his half-sister Jane died at age twelve, when George was about two. His father died of a sudden illness in April 1743 when George was eleven years old, and his half-brother Lawrence became a surrogate father and role model. William Fairfax was Lawrence's father-in-law and the cousin of Virginia's largest landowner Thomas, Lord Fairfax, and he was also a formative influence.[12][13]

Washington's father was the Justice of the Westmoreland County Court.[14] George spent much of his boyhood at Ferry Farm in Stafford County near Fredericksburg. Lawrence Washington inherited another family property from his father, a plantation on the Potomac River at Little Hunting Creek which he named Mount Vernon, in honor of his commanding officer Admiral Edward Vernon. George inherited Ferry Farm upon his father's death and eventually acquired Mount Vernon after Lawrence's death.[15]

Washington family
Coat of Arms[16]
The death of his father prevented Washington from an education at England's Appleby School such as his older brothers had received. He achieved the equivalent of an elementary school education from a variety of tutors, as well as from a school run by an Anglican clergyman in or near Fredericksburg.[17][18] There was talk of securing an appointment for him in the Royal Navy when he was 15, but it was dropped when his widowed mother objected.[19]

In 1751, Washington traveled to Barbados with Lawrence, who was suffering from tuberculosis, with the hope that the climate would be beneficial to Lawrence's health. Washington contracted smallpox during the trip, which left his face slightly scarred but immunized him against future exposures to the dreaded disease.[20] However, Lawrence's health failed to improve, and he returned to Mount Vernon where he died in the summer of 1752.[21] Lawrence's position as Adjutant General (militia leader) of Virginia was divided into four district offices after his death. Washington was appointed by Governor Dinwiddie as one of the four district adjutants in February 1753, with the rank of major in the Virginia militia.[22] During this period, Washington became a Freemason while in Fredericksburg, although his involvement was minimal.[23]

Surveyor
Washington's introduction to surveying began at an early age through school exercises that taught him the basics of the profession, followed by practical experience in the field. His first experiences at surveying occurred in the territory surrounding Mount Vernon. His first opportunity as a surveyor occurred in 1748 when he was invited to join a survey party organized by his neighbor and friend George Fairfax of Belvoir. Fairfax organized a professional surveying party to lay out large tracts of land along the border of western Virginia, where the young Washington gained invaluable experience in the field.[24]

Washington began his career as a professional surveyor in 1749 at the age of 17. He subsequently received a commission and surveyor's license from the College of William and Mary[d] and became the official surveyor for the newly formed Culpeper County. He was appointed to this well-paid official position thanks to his brother Lawrence's connect . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . n
Bup

Con

i collect num noms
Debate Round No. 1
WUDDA

Pro

Thats a good point but are nom noms good enough for donkey biscuits>???
Bup

Con

Guess what! series 2 is out and each pack comes with 3 donkey biscuits its untrucking believable
Debate Round No. 2
WUDDA

Pro

I like num noms now!... I think... sometimes maybe
Oh boy season 24 is out
Bup

Con

i hat num noms now, shopkins are where its at
Debate Round No. 3
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2 votes have been placed for this debate. Showing 1 through 2 records.
Vote Placed by Philosophy123 2 weeks ago
Philosophy123
WUDDABupTied
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Total points awarded:00 
Reasons for voting decision: They were both equally terrible.
Vote Placed by Tree_of_Death 3 weeks ago
Tree_of_Death
WUDDABupTied
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Total points awarded:01 
Reasons for voting decision: Conduct to Con since Pro plagiarized: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Washington