The Instigator
Arjunpillai
Pro (for)
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The Contender
Joel.98
Con (against)
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Can India become a Sports Superspower by 2020

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Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 8/11/2014 Category: Sports
Updated: 3 years ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 978 times Debate No: 59875
Debate Rounds (5)
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Arjunpillai

Pro

India is one of the nations which has high ambitions in many fields in which sports has always been very important. India which has already become a super power in Cricket is also excelling in many other fields. In the Currently ongoing Common Wealth Games with 12 golds already and in the 5th postion among 72 countries which shows India is already puting up a good show among aother super powers and we can expect to see India among the countries like China by the 2020 Olympics because there is increasing awareness among people which is helping India, which was 51st in the 2012 London Olympics, be that one step closer to becoming among the top 6 by 2020.
Joel.98

Con

INDIAN SPORT is today in a poor state of organisation. Its superstructure is top heavy; some of its foundations are built on shifting sands. The entire edifice has been corroded with jealousies and prejudices, provincialism and communalism, anomalies and stupidities. Players are merely the pawns in the annual skirmishes for power, the stepping stones by which social climbers and careerists find their way into presidential and committee chairs.”


Of the three stakeholders in a sportsman’s success, the sportsman himself, the administrators and the public at large, the greatest thrust for excellence has to come from the sportsman. Yet, that is not always the case. For so many years have Indian athletes shown themselves to be satisfied with the perks of participation rather than the rewards of performance that it no longer causes comment. A lifetime train pass, free telephone calls, a plot of land, apparent incentives meant to encourage the athlete to go faster, higher and stronger that act as roadblocks to effort when a performer is too easily satisfied.


“We don’t have a sporting culture. The biggest problem is sports medicine. We do not follow the scientific wisdom of the West. Also, not many people actually take part in high-level sports in India. It’s a shame with such a large population. The money going to cricket leads to a direct loss to other sports. But, I have hopes that we will, with the right professional attitude, learn to excel at sport,” says Dilip Tirkey, former Indian hockey captain and the only Adivasi to represent India in three Olympics.


It would be easy to blame the sportsmen and women. But they are part of a system that rewards mediocrity. The system is geared towards producing gracious losers, not aggressive winners. That is why India’s best efforts have come in individual sports. No tennis federation or badminton association or chess federation can take the credit for the successes of men like the Krishnans, the Amritrajs, the Leanders, the Padukones, and the Anands. They emerged from the strong, unbiased, focused organisation that has not been given enough credit — the family. Maggie Amritraj, the mother of tennis greats Vijay and Anand, Sushila Vishwanathan, chess wizard Anand’s mother, Ramesh Padukone, badminton ace Prakash’s father, and TK Ramanathan, father of tennis artist Krishnan and grandfather of junior Wimbledon and French Open winner Ramesh, are national heroes, even if unsung ones. They played the crucial roles in the success of their children, by making sacrifices appear commonplace to inspire them.


Most of these champions have had problems with their respective sports associations run by politicians and timeservers who want to take credit for every success but are experts at pointing fingers at others when things go wrong. When such champions continue to be harassed by officialdom, which functions in a heavy-handed bureaucratic manner, what chance do those on the lower rungs of the ladder have?


The public is largely indifferent to sportsmen till someone wins a world title and then it cannot have enough of him or her.


This has to do not so much with sports as with our overblown celebrity culture. If the officials have been able to get away with non-performance for decades, it also has to do with media indifference.


Our poor standing in Olympic sports has little to do with genetics or nutrition or body structure or muscle fibre. We are not a sporting nation in the way Australia or South Africa or Canada is. Or China has become, through a rigorous system of training and playing the percentages. And we will never become one till there is a change in attitude.


There are built-in handicaps, to be sure. Poverty, malnutrition, and more urgent needs of food, clothing and shelter that are bound to take precedence over the need to break the hurdles record or throw the javelin farther than anyone else. But in terms of sheer numbers, those who can make it in India is still larger than the population of countries like Kazakhstan and Mongolia who did better than us at the 2008 Beijing Olympics.


Power, pelf, influence, political clout, international exposure — the sportsmen might be denied all these, but the officials wallow in them. Former world billiards champion Michael Ferreira thinks the officials are “drunk on power”, but that is only a part of the picture. Politicians use sports as a platform, and if they divert sports funds for party work none is the wiser because accountability is not their strong suit. There is too the perk of disbursing profitable contracts to near and dear ones. Perhaps we get the sports minister we deserve.


For a sportsman to be effective in India, two things have to happen. The sports minister’s post must be delinked from politics and elections; the minister cannot be a politician. Like Nandan Nilekani, the chairman of the Unique Identification Authority of India, the sports minister has to be a top professional from the field who is given Cabinet rank.The power that goes with the office is used to put ‘lesser’ men in place, and cultivate a culture where ministers and officials assume the top positions in the sporting hierarchy, and expect sportsmen to pay obeisance as a matter of course. “It’s simple. We don’t have a sports culture in India. We need to develop it. Individuals have excelled like Abhinav Bindra in shooting, but a broader culture will take time,” says former Indian cricket captain and champion leg spinner Anil Kumble.


Are we looking to create a set of healthy Indians through regular everyday sports in short pumping up the club and fitness culture, call it what you will in the villages and towns. Or are we looking to create competitive sportsmen who will bring the country medals at international meets. Common sense tells us that there is a simple connection between the two. When a huge number of people take to sports, quality must emerge out of quantity.


Half of India’s huge population is under the age of 25, and that has to be an incentive to sporting excellence. Yet the horror stories are too deeply ingrained in the minds of parents, many of whom might have been frustrated by their own lack of success at competitive level because of forces outside their control. Sports is still not a career in India.


So, India cannot be super power unless it shows its powers in every aspect that every super power is showing. It could be arms race, Olympic medals, Research and development and legal patents, technologies, social fronts, business fronts, infrastructure fronts, travel and tourism, health and safety ... to name a few. Thus, to become super power you require healthy minds and sports can bring that revolution.


It is all leadership and management.


Debate Round No. 1
Arjunpillai

Pro

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Joel.98

Con

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Debate Round No. 2
Arjunpillai

Pro

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Joel.98

Con

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Debate Round No. 3
Arjunpillai

Pro

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Joel.98

Con

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Debate Round No. 4
Arjunpillai

Pro

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Joel.98

Con

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Debate Round No. 5
5 comments have been posted on this debate. Showing 1 through 5 records.
Posted by Arjunpillai 3 years ago
Arjunpillai
Please do . I was busy and couldnt post anything,
Posted by Joel.98 3 years ago
Joel.98
I'm not feeling well.. I'll try my best to avoid a forfeiture..
Posted by Joel.98 3 years ago
Joel.98
I referred.. that's all..
For debate we can use whatever resources available..
Posted by Arjunpillai 3 years ago
Arjunpillai
A copy from an Indian news site Tehelkha.
http://archive.tehelka.com...
Posted by Arjunpillai 3 years ago
Arjunpillai
Da joele ethu siteil ninnum copy cheyythata
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