The Instigator
jarret
Con (against)
Tied
0 Points
The Contender
sewook123
Pro (for)
Tied
0 Points

Canadians have their own language?

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Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 4/8/2014 Category: Miscellaneous
Updated: 2 years ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 644 times Debate No: 51945
Debate Rounds (4)
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jarret

Con

I, from Canada, firmly believe that against all stereotypes and such, we have no "unique" language. first round acceptance.
sewook123

Pro

I accept.

For your information, I am not from Canada but am currently living in Vancouver.
Not a single time in my five years here have I thought that Canada had a unique language.

Unique: adj. "being the only one of its kind; unlike anything else" [1]

I am looking forward to this interesting debate!

[1] http://www.oxforddictionaries.com...
Debate Round No. 1
jarret

Con

I look forward to this too!

Not a single time in my five years here have I thought that Canada had a unique language.
Ugh. you sorta ruined the debate with that one statement. oh well :-)

I'll start my argument off with the common stereotypes. Americans (some of them) believe that we ride polar bears to school and live in igloos. Polar bears are carnivorous mammals that live in the arctic circle (Canada) the are wild, and have been known to attack humans. However, the Inuit people in Northern Canada do occasionally live in igloos. Second, apparently our Southern neighbours don't use the words 'eh', 'toque', and 'gravol'.
eh: an interrogative utterance, usually expressing surprise or doubt or seeking confirmation.
toque: a brimless and close-fitting hat.
Gravol: (Canadian) a medicine used to treat travel sickness or nausea
sewook123

Pro

Thank you for your arguments.

Since Con has stated that English words used in Canada differ from those used in the United States, I will assume that the Canadian language as Canadian-English and that I am debating that Canada has no unique language.

"Ugh. you sorta ruined the debate with that one statement. oh well :-)"
Sorry, it was not my intention to ruin this debate.

I will first rebut my opponent's arguments.

1. "I'll start my argument off with the common stereotypes"

I don't really understand the connection between Canadian archetype and Canada's having its own language. Please clarify.

2. "Second, apparently our Southern neighbours don't use the words 'eh', 'toque', and 'gravol'. "

This may be true, but trivial differences in words don't distinguish among languages. Merriam Webster dictionary defines "language" as "the system of words or signs that people use to express thoughts and feelings to each other" and "any one of the systems of human language that are used and understood by a particular group of people."[1] Since small differences in words do not change the overall principle of the language, the very slightly different English Canadians use cannot be considered a whole new language.

Now I will present my arguments.

1. Definition of Language
As I mentioned earlier, Canadian-English does not qualify to be considered a unique language, separate from 'English.' Even if there are some small differences, Canadians and Americans are able to communicate using their "own language." Since the language spoken in Canada can be understood by those who speak American-english, British-English, Australian-English, and etc., Canadian English can not be considered as a whole new language.

2. Canadian English is a form of dialect
Dialect is defined as "a form of a language that is spoken in a particular area and that uses some of its own words, grammar, and pronunciations" by Merriam Webster dictionary.[2] English, and even French, spoken in Canada fits this definition. As Con pointed out, Canadian English has its own words. It has its own grammar and pronunciations, as seen by 'zed' rather than 'zee.'

Therefore, Canadian English is not a unique language. It is a dialect that has derived from the World's most spoken language in the world.

I await Con's rebuttals and arguments.

[1]http://www.merriam-webster.com...
[2]http://www.merriam-webster.com...
Debate Round No. 2
jarret

Con

jarret forfeited this round.
sewook123

Pro

My arguments and rebuttals still stand.
Debate Round No. 3
jarret

Con

jarret forfeited this round.
sewook123

Pro

Vote Pro!
Debate Round No. 4
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