The Instigator
Katty
Pro (for)
Losing
0 Points
The Contender
Mitchell.Drew
Con (against)
Winning
7 Points

Children Behavior in this generation has gotten worse then before? Yes OR No

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Post Voting Period
The voting period for this debate has ended.
after 1 vote the winner is...
Mitchell.Drew
Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 5/30/2015 Category: Society
Updated: 1 year ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 486 times Debate No: 75976
Debate Rounds (3)
Comments (2)
Votes (1)

 

Katty

Pro

This day and time we have children of all ages using explicit words. In elementary schools in the past teacher would phone parents to let them know that their child was acting inappropriately, or expressing himself or herself in a inappropriate way. "He told me his friends say "F" word and the "B" word." (Chareumthasouk) a concerned parent in Janesville said to the Gazettextra. A teacher even stated that she was never had a first grader tell her to "F-off before. (Schultz). It is not only language that has gotten worse in children"s. We also have kindergartens who have done unimaginable things then they have before."A boy was seen poking his hand up a girl"s skirt. The same boy held scissors to the necks of his classmates, one witness told Janesville police."(Schultz) When have we ever heard this happening in kindergartens

FRANK J. SCHULTZ (2012) Children behaving badly: Has it gotten worse? Retrived from; http://www.gazettextra.com...-
badly-has-it-gotten-worse/#sthash.z8h8qt1y.dpuf
Mitchell.Drew

Con

Taking the side of Con in this debate, I intend to show that child behaviour is not worse in this generation than those before, and at the very least, is not demonstrably worse.

Let's begin with the use of explicit words. There is plenty of anecdotal evidence that the use of profanity has become more prevalent, but there are a few objections that can be made to that.

The first, and most obvious, is that it is simply anecdotal evidence. I'm sure that my opponent is familiar with the concept of "Rosy Retrospection", a common memory bias whereby a person is more likely to remember things as being better than they are now. With no real documentation on the general behaviour or swearing of children in previous generations, all we have are the lamentations of teachers and parents who may be susceptible to such a bias.
The second objection concerns the perception on the morality of swearing; how is it indicative of deteriorating child behaviour? Despite a long-held view that swearing is for the less educated and articulated part of society, they are perfectly valid words in the English language, serve particular purposes, and carry unique connotations and expressions that other language may not be able to express as coherently or with enough conviction. A child using offensive language is no different from a child using language considered to be "not-offensive" with the same intent any any way other than different effects on our sensitivities.

Finally, an objection to the three examples of behaviour presented towards the end of Pros' paragraph: A First-grader telling their teacher to "F-off", a Kindergarten boy poking his hand up a girls' skirt, and the same boy holding scissors to the neck of one of his classmates. The reason I don't class the first instance with my first objections is due to it being more about the intent of force behind the language, rather than the language itself.

In regards to all three of these instances, these could more easily be attributed to cases of human behaviour, rather than child behaviour specifically. Children as just as varied and unique in the personalities as adults are, and as such there are those who display less favourable traits. This, however, does not indicate a general decline in the overall behaviour of children.
Furthermore, and particularly in regards to the last two instances, these actions could be more indicative of the naivety of the child, especially considering that the child was in Kindergarten. At this age, a boy sticking his hand up a girls skirt could mean any number of things other than the intentionally negative behaviour implied by Pros' argument. Simple, but misplaced curiosity on the boys' part, or imitation of behaviour from an adult without understanding the full implications or repercussions of such an action. In the last instance, and without any extra information about the event given (whether it was done in a way where intent and proper cognition of what he was doing on the boys' part), it can easily be boiled down to naivety and a misunderstanding the actions' full implications and potential harm.
Debate Round No. 1
Katty

Pro

Katty forfeited this round.
Mitchell.Drew

Con

I extend all arguments posted in Round One.
Debate Round No. 2
Katty

Pro

Katty forfeited this round.
Mitchell.Drew

Con

Unfortunately my opponent has seen to fit forfeit (or was perhaps unable to continue the debate for some other reason), a decidely unfortunate first argument for the both of us. Regardless, I thank my opponent for the opportunity to debate him/her, and wish them luck in future debates.

I once again extend all arguments posted in Round One, and close the debate on whether the behaviour of children has gotten worse in this generation than those before.
Debate Round No. 3
2 comments have been posted on this debate. Showing 1 through 2 records.
Posted by trevor32192 1 year ago
trevor32192
This entire debate is completely subjective. Saying bad language is subjective in itself due to ones point of view. You think some words are bad others would argue that some words are good and others like myself would argue that all words are neutral. All actions are subjective also even so much as killing someone is not always positive or negative. Thus being said comparing different generations is completely subjective to ones view point on what is right and wrong which is also subjective upon ones morals.
Posted by Stasavraam333 1 year ago
Stasavraam333
I believe that nowadays, children and teenagers (being one myself) have been desensitised to explicit language and so use it in often inappropriate situations, leading to them being labelled anti-social. I can confirm with certainty that we swear in class, at break, with friends and at other people. And, it is no longer being viewed as anti-social by our peers! Social media, I think, has also helped make swearing main-stream and acceptable language. My parents were disgusted when I told them what people were calling me, when I found what they said pretty standard, simply demonstrating and proving my point!
1 votes has been placed for this debate.
Vote Placed by Chain 1 year ago
Chain
KattyMitchell.DrewTied
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Total points awarded:07 
Reasons for voting decision: FF