The Instigator
wtchandl
Pro (for)
Losing
0 Points
The Contender
Zyanya
Con (against)
Winning
5 Points

College scholarship football players should receive a stipend or a form of payment for their service

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Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 3/28/2011 Category: Sports
Updated: 6 years ago Status: Voting Period
Viewed: 2,180 times Debate No: 15646
Debate Rounds (3)
Comments (0)
Votes (1)

 

wtchandl

Pro

In my communications classes I have repeatedly debated the topic of paying college football players because they are unable to work. Due to how much time is spent in the off season as well at in season. I am a college football player myself and find it hard to support my personal expense. Toiletries, clothes, food other than the dining and even a night out once and a while. Having school paid is indeed a big burden off my shoulders but school alone is not the financial issue of any college student.

Theres also the fact that university's make so much money off the athletes that a portion of should go to the players. After all they are the one's people come to see. College coaches make allot of money, just half their salary without incentives would be more than enough to help out the players.
Zyanya

Con

I'll happily debate this topic with you.

I feel that for athletes receiving a scholarship I don't think its fair for them to receive a stipend or any other form of money on top of this. College is EXPENSIVE and it's hard to pay for. If you get a scholarship to get you through college you should be grateful and I'm not the only one saying it Whitlock a former division 1 basketball player (including scholarship) agrees. Take a peek at what he has to say on the topic. I'll say this as a college student I can barely afford to be here. Just being able to pay for school is a blessing and athletes should treat it like one.

My first point would have to be given the current guidelines say "It is a violation of the NCAA rules for athletes to accept money or gifts while intending to remain eligible." which means clearly that you can't pay athletes. However, clearly we are ignoring this; I'll just move into the rest of my argument.

According to the Washington Post the average athletics scholarship is $10,000 a year (Bowen). This equals out to $1,111 a month while schools in session. Currently, I work 26 hours a week and take 16 credits a quarter make out with about 900-950 a month after taxes. I am also paying for college out of my own pocket plus loans. The scholarship, in my mind, is the payment for work rendered. Not only this athletes get to travel (which even at a smaller school like mine costs about $100,000), have access to facilities other students don't and oftentimes have athletic trainers which are limited to athletes. Another thing is that colleges help their athletes to go professional by putting them in the spotlight. This gives them a chance to go Pro which they wouldn't otherwise have.

My cousin is a full-ride football scholarship student at UW and manages to find time to work to pay for his additional expenses. He works an evening job because he needs to do class and practice during the day. I feel that he is proof that any athletics student can find ways to make ends meet.

If athletes receive pay for their services beyond a scholarship even more money is spent. This can lead to higher tuition for students and things being cut in the schools. Right now would not be the time to start paying athletes beyond their scholarships. Currently many colleges are having their money cut on a federal and state wide level. The revenue from money making sports, such as football, are used to pay for other sports that are less supported by revenue. Given the majority of these are women's sports which the school has to support because of Title IX schools HAVE TO pour money from revenues of other sports to support it.

Athletes at a college level are AMATURES which means that they don't get a paycheck for playing. They can be motivated to play by a scholarship, but to give them money via the university makes them professional players.

Bowen, Fred. "Don't Bank on a Sports Scholarship - Washingtonpost.com." The Washington Post: National, World & D.C. Area News and Headlines - Washingtonpost.com. 4 Apr. 2008. Web. 28 Mar. 2011. .

Whitlock, Jason. "ESPN.com - Page2 - College Athletes Already Paid in Full." ESPN: The Worldwide Leader In Sports. 2007. Web. 28 Mar. 2011. .
Debate Round No. 1
wtchandl

Pro

Obviously, I am aware of NCAA rule: "It is a violation of the NCAA rules for athletes to accept money or gifts while intending to remain eligible." If that wasn't the case, this argument would not have even been raised.
When it comes to the scholarships given, on average a student athlete, at Florida State University for example, receives 1,500 dollars a semester for meals and books. A meal plan will add up to 1,200 dollars a semester leaving the student athlete 300 dollars for books. Depending on their major, this would not even cover there books. With this in mind, depending on the athlete, he receives less money than a regular student on scholarship. Some student athletes are not even on scholarship.
It is indeed a benefit that students get to travel; however it is more of a hindrance than a reward. When the average student has a big test coming up, they could choose to call in sick to work or have a friend cover. Student athletes do not have that luxury. When there is a game in Ohio, the student athlete has to go. During the game there is no studying. Traveling also causes them to miss class time, sometimes several days in a row. They miss tests and specified instruction that cannot be made up. Depending on the time of the year, student athletes can really fall behind on their studies Also, you said you work 26 hours a week, a college football player can easily put in 30 hours a week and not receive any form of payment for it. This is not including game days or summer training.
There are special faculties for student athletes because there are certain regiments that they need to specialize in. It would be hard to fit over 125 football players on campus facilities, with most of the athletes weighing close to 300 pounds. As for trainers, there are not any special trainers accessible to the athletes. The coaches make the workout regiments for athletes to follow through with. These "trainers" serve more as doctors. They are needed in case an emergency, broken bones or head injuries, occur.
Schools are given a certain amount of money a year, and they choose how it will be spent. Schools should make better decisions on what needs to be built and spend the money more wisely, like on student athletes that bring in multi-million dollars through their services.

Football players do not see any of the thousands of dollars that they are compensated for. A week in the life of a college football player is more time demanding and also physically demanding. At my university, the average time spent per week exceeds the time of any campus or off campus job. While they work less hours they choose what happens with their money.
Zyanya

Con

REBUTTAL (Note: Where is your response to my statements?)
"When it comes to the scholarships given, on average a student athlete, at Florida State University for example, receives 1,500 dollars a semester for meals and books. A meal plan will add up to 1,200 dollars a semester leaving the student athlete 300 dollars for books. Depending on their major, this would not even cover there books."

In regards to this I stick to my $10,000 for the average scholarship for student athletes. Therefore, it does in fact cover meals and books. Furthermore, as this is for just football players the average from my source from before says that this number is even higher once you discount tennis, volleyball and soccer.
Football players in general receive the largest scholarships in the athletic scholarship arena.

"Some student athletes are not even on scholarship."

However, I will disregard this because our topic clearly says "College scholarship football players". Students without a scholarship are not included in this debate.

"It is indeed a benefit that students get to travel; however it is more of a hindrance than a reward. When the average student has a big test coming up, they could choose to call in sick to work or have a friend cover. Student athletes do not have that luxury. When there is a game in Ohio, the student athlete has to go. During the game there is no studying. Traveling also causes them to miss class time, sometimes several days in a row. They miss tests and specified instruction that cannot be made up. Depending on the time of the year, student athletes can really fall behind on their studies"

The same is true for debate teams, science clubs and any clubs involving animals. It is the price students pay for doing extra curriculars. I choose to be a part of the finance board at my school and have to miss classes for the privilege. I put in extra time for my clubs and for the finance board that has no real compensation than the fact that it opens more doors for me (as does football for football players) and for the love of my hobbies.

"Also, you said you work 26 hours a week, a college football player can easily put in 30 hours a week and not receive any form of payment for it. This is not including game days or summer training.

I work 26 hours a week its true. However, I also have extra-curriculars (as stated above) that I put in time for without any compensation.

"There are special faculties for student athletes because there are certain regiments that they need to specialize in. It would be hard to fit over 125 football players on campus facilities, with most of the athletes weighing close to 300 pounds. "

Are you claiming that a football player can't fit in campus facilities because of their size? I don't understand this statement. Yes, there are special facilities for football players because they need to specialize in it, but what about the other students needs. The other students education.

"As for trainers, there are not any special trainers accessible to the athletes. The coaches make the workout regiments for athletes to follow through with. These "trainers" serve more as doctors. They are needed in case an emergency, broken bones or head injuries, occur."

Even small, unathletic focused schools such as The Evergreen State College has not only a athletic trainer for their athletes (exclusively), but coaches and assistant coaches to help students improve and expensive thing to have. At The Evergreen State College it is not the ADMINSTRATION that pays for these assistant coaches and athletic trainers, but STUDENT FEES that pay for them. Many schools follow this practice.

"Schools are given a certain amount of money a year, and they choose how it will be spent. Schools should make better decisions on what needs to be built and spend the money more wisely, like on student athletes that bring in multi-million dollars through their services."

Schools are required by law to cover some things. As I said in my previous post schools HAVE TO pay for women sports because of Title IX. Furthermore, most schools have many expenses because teachers, staff, student employees, librarians all have to be paid. To pay athletes the school would have to cut much needed funding for students who do have to pay the full scholarship. They could even cut trainers, assistant coaches and things that effect the student athletes. Much of the activities you see such as childcare centers and many athletic programs are in fact paid for with STUDENT FEES. Again administration is unlikely to foot the bill, but if student fees cover it then student fees will have to increase for every student to pay for the difference. To claim that schools are not utilizing their money is the statement of one who does not know how finances work. Many schools in several states are in the debt. Furthermore, again I will state that schools would have to raise tuition for everyone to pay athletes.

In further response to this I doubt that you've bothered to ask your school to show you the spread sheets for expenses for athletics to figure out if there are really is multi-millions at stake. While football teams bring in revenue they also are expensive to run and net-profits are lower than you would think (Rose). Besides most sports are in the red for revenue which is what footballs profits can help cover.

"Football players do not see any of the thousands of dollars that they are compensated for."

I don't believe this is what you intended to say. I think you meant to say that they are NOT compensated for. As I said before I think the things that football scholarship athletes recive is more than enough to compensate them for their amerture playing. Facilities, free travel (including food, hotel and transportation which adds about to about $100,000 assuming only 120 athletes), trainers and coaches for support, money for college, and an education.

" A week in the life of a college football player is more time demanding and also physically demanding. At my university, the average time spent per week exceeds the time of any campus or off campus job. While they work less hours they choose what happens with their money. "

I think this is rather assumptions of you to assume that your work is more demanding per work the "any campus or off campus job". I'm sure your campus has mothers/fathers or people with many demands on their finances that work 2-3 jobs to make ends meet. Furthermore, I'm sure there are professionals at your school who work 40-60 hours a week at their job. I feel that to claim you work harder than them is to give them a great disservice.

Rose, Adam . "Football is big breadwinner for USC athletics | All Things Trojan | Los Angeles Times."�Top of the Ticket. LA Times, 15 Oct. 2008. Web. 29 Mar. 2011. <http://latimesblogs.latimes.com...;.
Debate Round No. 2
wtchandl

Pro

wtchandl forfeited this round.
Zyanya

Con

Zyanya forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 3
No comments have been posted on this debate.
1 votes has been placed for this debate.
Vote Placed by Cobo 6 years ago
Cobo
wtchandlZyanyaTied
Agreed with before the debate:-Vote Checkmark-0 points
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Total points awarded:05 
Reasons for voting decision: Hmmm. They Both forfieted the last round. Agruments and Conduct were decent. But I'm Giving Zyanya the win becuase she actually had some good sources and Pro technically dropped her arguments so she did not really need to respond.