The Instigator
J2
Pro (for)
The Contender
Ripred
Con (against)

Colleges should pay their student athletes if the college profits from the palyers

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Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 4/30/2017 Category: Sports
Updated: 8 months ago Status: Debating Period
Viewed: 598 times Debate No: 102321
Debate Rounds (3)
Comments (0)
Votes (0)

 

J2

Pro

Student athletes need to be paid fairly if the college profits from their efforts. By fairly, I mean the student athlete deserves a proportional payout based on the overall percentage they helped generate from ticket sales, merchandise, television revenue, and any other form of capital the school made. Working without any form of compensation is unfair and even though some schools might pay the student via scholarships and food vouchers, it is never proportionally fair.
Ripred

Con

I believe that student athletes shouldn't be paid. At the end of the day they are kids. Some of them might save their money and make smart decisions, but most wouldn't. They would just go and spend their money on new cars, houses, and t.v's. I think if athletes were to be payed, they should be informed on how to spend their money, or shown how easily athletes go broke.
Debate Round No. 1
J2

Pro

When you say that college athletes are kids, could you elaborate? By legal standards, once you are over 18 years old you are no longer legally a kid anymore unless you are using a colloquial version of kid. I don't mean to be stringent, I simply want to be absolutely clear on what you mean. Also, when you say that some might save their money but most wouldn't, why do you make this claim? I personally know many college students who use their money on basic necessities such as food, rent, the internet, and transportation. However, even if what you say is correct, I don't think it applies to my initial point. What the athlete decides to spend their earned money on doesn't matter, they earned it. Based on your statement that kids aren't smart with their money, should jobs be allowed to not pay student employees? I ask this because it is the same principle, only instead of a traditional job the student is participating in a sport aka physical labor. I do agree with your final point on teaching athletes, or any student for that matter, how to spend and save their money more responsibly. Not only is this a skill that can be carried on for entire generations, but it would help local economies in the long run but I digress.
Ripred

Con

When I said they were kids, I meant in spirit. They are legally adults, but are still young and naive. I have seen many times where kids spend money on things they don't need. But yes they can use their money on anything, because its their money. But I believe its a bad idea to pay theses kids because some sports earn much more money then others. On average American Football earns 29.6 million while the second most earning sport, men's basketball makes 7.8 million for NCAA 1 athletics. Via http://www.businessinsider.com.... This would mean many athletes would make more money then others. Not to mention the wealth made on College sports is not evenly distributed. Only 24 colleges make 100+ million on sports. 77% of Colleges make less then 50 million, and 44% make less then 20 million in revenue. Via http://www.businessinsider.com.... This would mean athletes at smaller schools would make less money, and the schools couldn't update their sports facilities. This mixed with the fact that athletes would make more money at bigger schools would mean that big schools would get all the athletes, and smaller schools would loose athletes and sports.
Debate Round No. 2
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Debate Round No. 3
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