The Instigator
DeltaMed910
Pro (for)
Winning
4 Points
The Contender
pinkypie671
Con (against)
Losing
0 Points

Color guard is not a sport.

Do you like this debate?NoYes+0
Add this debate to Google Add this debate to Delicious Add this debate to FaceBook Add this debate to Digg  
Post Voting Period
The voting period for this debate has ended.
after 2 votes the winner is...
DeltaMed910
Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 8/30/2015 Category: Sports
Updated: 1 year ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 772 times Debate No: 79174
Debate Rounds (5)
Comments (6)
Votes (2)

 

DeltaMed910

Pro

This debate is about modern day color guard and whether or not they should be considered a sport. I am AGAINST the concept of color guard being a sport. Anyone is open to debate me, but I would like to see a current guard member and her/his opinions.

Definitions

color guard: non-military color guard mainly using flags, rifles, and sabres (possibly katanas, which is what I used)

sport: a competitive activity between two or more individuals or teams in which there is a definitive clash among the participants where they interact and adapt to their opponents using a high degree of athleticism in order to directly score definitive points

I would assume that this is common sense, but it seems like a nice formality.
1. Follow an organized debate structure
2. No plagiarism/trolling/deconstructional semantic/etc.
3. Terms/definitions are OPEN to debate, although then the Pro must fight a two-front war.

Round Structure:
1. Setup/Accept
2. CON constructive/ PRO constructive
3. CON refute+ extend (opt.)/ PRO refute+ extend (opt.)
4. CON refute+ extend (opt.)/ PRO refute+ extend (opt.)
5. CON summary, reasons why they won/ PRO summary + final refute, reasons why they won

I only think it's fair for PRO to have the final say because I (CON) instigated this debate.
Debate Round No. 1
DeltaMed910

Pro

First of all, I thank everyone for participating in this debate. The main purpose of this debate is to focus on the resolution of "Should Color Guard be considered a sport?" This has been a long argument at my high school, for both pro and con. Although I have had experiences being on guard, I will present three main arguments to show why color guard is NOT a sport.

Before I go into my arguments, review key terms in this debate. Color guard is straightforward-- a non-military color guard. On the other hand, sport should be defined as a competitive activity between two or more individuals or teams in which there is a definitive clash among the participants where they interact and adapt to their opponents using a high degree of athleticism in order to directly score definitive points. Although this definition is widely accepted across the board, especially in the Olympics, my opponent is welcomed to oppose it.

Color guard is NOT a sport. It is an activity.

1. Color Guard competitions do not have a definitive scoring system.

A sport should be where teams are pitted against each other and the points earned a relative scale that shows one side's dominance over the other. However, like debate competitions, points are awarded to guards that perform to the judges' personal standards. An excellently coordinated pirouette with a horizontal toss can be awarded 6 points by one judge and 7 points by another. These points are added, and compared with others. This simply compares how "impressive" each team was. One might argue and say figure skating also shouldn't be a sport under this definition. Figure skating has an officially accepted judging criteria called the IJC-- International Judging Criteria-- and the 6.0 system, but Winter Guard International has none. Guard is instead about telling a story. A standalone quad or an impressive peggy spin won't cut it, but if 10 members do different things that when put together, then points are given for their unity. Sports are not about being given points for unit cohesion but instead implementing unit cohesion so that an individual can earn a definitive amount of points. Earn, not given. A guard will practice the exact same moves over and over again to be able to replicate them at the competition, with the purpose of hopefully impressing the panel of 5 judges. This shows no interaction between the competing teams and leads into my second argument.

2. There is no clear interaction between clashing forces and no adaptation to the opposing side's actions.

A sport should be about how one side can overcome the other by interacting and adapting to the opponent. Sports mainly require strength, endurance, and strategy implementation. In an average basketball or football game, strategies are developed then discarded. If the opponent happens to steal the ball, the team goes from a defensive to an offensive strategy. The strategy for color guard is a one way road. Practice, practice, and practice the same moves over and over again. There is no change. At the end of the day, guard shows are a perfect example of a continuous monotonous movement that is simply replicated on a stage. Of course, every sport has a routine practicing of motions, but a person who plays sports has the liberty to pick and choose which motion s/he wishes to implement. A tennis player practices both forehands and backhands so that s/he can choose whether to do either. However, while a guard member should practice both flourishes and crazy 8s, s/he doesn't get the liberty to switch in the middle of the movement. This rigidity and inflexibility for guard members to plan and react raises questions if color guard should even be considered a sport.

3. It's not recognized by the Olympics.

Color guard is not officially recognized by the Olympics. Yes, it fits similar criteria as ribbon dancing, figure skating, gymnastics, and more, but it's still not in or recognized by the Olympics. It should be known by the opposition that "not" being in the Olympics is no longer a valid reason for declaring an activity not a sport due to the recent cap of Olympic sports to 28 (hence baseball being dismissed), but the International Olympics Committee still recognizes sports that are sports (ie. tug of war). Color guard has not been recognized as a sport-- there is clearly something about color guard that does not define it as a sport.

Overall, I presented three clear cut arguments proving why color guard is not a sport. If every activity involving athleticism were a sport, what wouldn't be? Obviously being classified a sport should have more complexity and interaction that that, and color guard just doesn't make the cut. Color guard will remain an activity-- a difficult and challenging one-- and sadly not an official sport. I look forward to my opponent's arguments.
pinkypie671

Con

Colour guard is a sport

The definition of a sport goes as follows:
1. competitive physical activity: an individual or group competitive activity involving physical exertion or skill, governed by rules, and sometimes engaged in professionally ( often used in the plural )

Is color guard a competitive physical activity?
Yes it is there are many competitions. Now there may not be a definite loser but that is because so many groups that compete. For sure the winner does get prestige just as if they had won a super bowl. Color guard is a group activity that is very physical and full of athleticism.

Ever heard the annoyingly worn-out argument, "Cheerleading is not a sport"? The truth is that legally, North Augusta cheerleading is NOT a sport. In cheerleading however, you compete through the districts. Soccer and football does the same too. Therefore I believe that whatever sports argument they are cooking up falls.

"It is not recognized by the olympics"
Here is the issue with this. Golf is a sport. However it is not in the olympics. Does that mean Golf is no longer a sport?
Just because it is not in the olympics does not define what really is a sport. Sure there are many non sports that aren't in the olympics. However we can still justify that golf is a sport and we can't exclude that from a sports. Therefore this argument is false.

Not all competitions need a definitive scoring system. Numbers don't define what is right or wrong, likewise what is a sport or not.

"there is no clear interaction"
Their definition is very biased in my opinion. Their definition only indicates that there is a NEED to score points and show a clash among participants. However, this is only referring to his arguments and not the whole case in general. For that I believe this is more biased towrds his side.
Here is my definition that refers to both sides: competitive physical activity: an individual or group competitive activity involving physical exertion or skill, governed by rules, and sometimes engaged in professionally

They have stated that they need to practice the same moves overtime. However this is still physical. It shows skills and physical exertion on how to achieve this. For that, their "two side" argument falls.

Thanks
Debate Round No. 2
DeltaMed910

Pro

The Dictionary.com definition of a sport goes as follows:
competitive physical activity: an individual or group competitive activity involving physical exertion or skill, governed by rules, and sometimes engaged in professionally.
That is undeniable.

But it is also undeniable that for an activity to be LEGALLY classified as a sport, the sport must meet the qualifications for Title IX, which has been supported over and over again, especially in the 2009 lawsuits.

Title IX goes:
"...[For the activity to be a sport, it] must have coaches, practices, competitions during a defined season, a governing organization, a clearly defined scoring system, as well as a high degree of athleticism. The activity also must have competition as its primary goal -- not merely the support of other athletic teams..."
I feel when debating the legality of whether or not something is a sport, this should be the definition on which we argue, not a wishy-washy definition from Dictionary.com.

Color guard is notorious to be those "flag twirlers" that play with the marching band during half time shows, much like cheerleaders. Just because an activity "competes through districts" and some parts of it are similar to a sport does NOT make the activity a sport.
Until Title IX is repealed by the Supreme Court or an Appeals Circuit, color guard will not be accepted as a sport.

Now I would like to go into my rather short rebuttals, owing to the fact that the Pro had a pathetic excuse for a constructive case.
A. Competitive physical activity
The opponent believes that because color guard has competitions and if they win, they get similar prestige to that of a Super Bowl winner, it defines guard as a sport. This is far from true-- I even daresay color guard is closer to a circus than to a football team. Color guard is more about simple flourishes and mildly difficult gymnastics that are coordinated and staggered to make a play or a show. I say this with personal experience, experience my opponent doesn't seem to have. Guard is not even COMPARABLE to the amount of skill and effort an average professional soccer player or a football player puts in. Let's not avoid the obvious; it's much easier to learn how to do a backflip and a quad than to make a goal in soccer (you'll be lucky to find a total of 4 goals in a soccer game) or a touchdown. I hope this proves my point.

It's time for some extensions.
1. Counter to: "It is not recognized by the Olympics"
As I have mentioned in my third argument, although the Olympics does not allow all sorts of sports to be played on the Olympics, they still recognize sports that are sports. For example, even though tug-of-war is clearly not something we see in the Olympics today, the International Olympics Committee did however give official recognition declaring "tug-of-war" a sport in 1920. The same holds true for American football, baseball, golf, etc., but not for color guard.

2. Counter to: "Not all competitions need a definitive scoring system"
I'm going to go out on a limb here and be a kid-- I TRIPLE DOG DARE YOU TO FIND A SPORT WITHOUT A DEFINITIVE SCORING SYSTEM. A relationship between all sports is that definitive points are earned for certain actions, like scoring a goal, and that the points earned by each team is a relative indicator of skill over the other. If my opponent is unable to find a solid example of a sport without a definitive scoring system-- something color guard doesn't have (of course, when they're not too busy spinning rifles for the football team)-- my definition of a sport needing a scoring system holds true and steady.

3. Counter to: "there is no clear interaction"
Yes, some may see how my definition is a tad biased. But as I have proven (above), my definition is solid, supported by evidence, and shows a clear relationship between all sports--to requote-- they MUST have coaches, practices, competitions during a defined season, a governing organization, a clearly defined scoring system, as well as a high degree of athleticism. The activity also must have competition as its primary goal -- not merely the support of other athletic teams. This is undoubtedly better that a ripped off definition from an online dictionary, which ironically is the closest thing the Proposition has to evidence.

Overall, the CON side provided you with a logical definition of a "sport" backed by the Supreme Court, three clear arguments, a strong rebuttal to PRO's poorly scrambled constructive case, and three hard extensions to our arguments in counter to three casual rebuttals. Whether they like it or not, we are winning this debate.

Thank you.
pinkypie671

Con

Okay if you are winning then I concede, since you are in complaint of my presence and structure
Debate Round No. 3
DeltaMed910

Pro

Correct me if I'm wrong, but each side is supposed to think that they're winning. Just because I made an insult shouldn't mean that you have to concede.

But that is your choice.
If you do in fact concede, the PRO (mistakenly labelled as "CON" in my arguments) wins.

:/
pinkypie671

Con

You win good job m8
Debate Round No. 4
DeltaMed910

Pro

By laws of debate, since the contender has forfeited, the PRO team wins.
pinkypie671

Con

In conclusion:

this topic sucks

Vote Con

JK Vote hell

Satan is coming after ya
Debate Round No. 5
6 comments have been posted on this debate. Showing 1 through 6 records.
Posted by DeltaMed910 1 year ago
DeltaMed910
JUST A NOTE TO THE VOTERS:
Due to a technicality that forced me to rename this debate, I am on the PRO side saying Color guard is NOT a sport. However, in the debate, I will often call my side the "CON side" because the original title of this debate was "Color guard IS a sport".

Thank you, and sorry for the confusion
Posted by DeltaMed910 1 year ago
DeltaMed910
yes I agree. Sakting has a panel of 5 judges that look for individual things, just like color guard. However skating has a predetermined grading system and criteria called the IJC as well as the 6.0 point system. WGI, on the other hand, relies giving out points based on the individual judges' discretion. If WGI had a solid point system, maybe guard can qualify as a sport. Until then, nope.
Posted by robertacollier 1 year ago
robertacollier
Skating is judged, just like color guard. Each has a criteria for judging. Skating is closer to color guard in that sense than it is to football.
Posted by DeltaMed910 1 year ago
DeltaMed910
I may not be able to do triple backflips, but I did do guard. Skating is a sport. And sorry I guess I wasn't clear. In football, the referees don't give your team points because you worked together. You work together so that one person can score that touchdown. In color guard, a standalone quad won't give you points, but the entire team doing a coordinated one may. This gives the impression it is more of a dance show or a musical play, not a competing sport.
The Con is open to challenge my definition.

And I don't really give a f*ck either, and I can argue for either side, but I need three debates to vote, and I want them to be real debates.
Posted by robertacollier 1 year ago
robertacollier
Pro used the words "color guard" in his definition of color guard, so that is not helpful. Sport is also just physical exertion in competition. Color guards compete and I'm sure it takes some effort.

Pro also said, "Sports are not about being given points for unit cohesion but instead implementing unit cohesion so that an individual can earn a definitive amount of points." His criteria is actually the heart of sports teamwork. Getting points for unit cohesion is the classic epitome of teammates working together. If you don't have cohesion on the football field or basketball court, then you're not scoring points.

In the end, who really gives a fvck if some floor show calls themselves a sport?. It's not like people are now going to run out and pay $100 a ticket to see them just because they declare they're in the same category as Usain Bolt. Running is one of the purest sports and it gets a lot of Olympics airplay. Skating and gymnastics are judged competitions that get just as much airplay. I'd like to see Pro tell a gold medal woman skater that she's not a competing athlete. I'd like to see Pro do three consecutive back flips on a floor mat.
Posted by DeltaMed910 1 year ago
DeltaMed910
sorry-- "before i go into my arguments, *let's* review..."
2 votes have been placed for this debate. Showing 1 through 2 records.
Vote Placed by Midnight1131 1 year ago
Midnight1131
DeltaMed910pinkypie671Tied
Agreed with before the debate:--Vote Checkmark0 points
Agreed with after the debate:--Vote Checkmark0 points
Who had better conduct:--Vote Checkmark1 point
Had better spelling and grammar:--Vote Checkmark1 point
Made more convincing arguments:Vote Checkmark--3 points
Used the most reliable sources:--Vote Checkmark2 points
Total points awarded:30 
Reasons for voting decision: Concession.
Vote Placed by Unbelievable.Time 1 year ago
Unbelievable.Time
DeltaMed910pinkypie671Tied
Agreed with before the debate:--Vote Checkmark0 points
Agreed with after the debate:--Vote Checkmark0 points
Who had better conduct:Vote Checkmark--1 point
Had better spelling and grammar:--Vote Checkmark1 point
Made more convincing arguments:--Vote Checkmark3 points
Used the most reliable sources:--Vote Checkmark2 points
Total points awarded:10 
Reasons for voting decision: Concession by Con.