The Instigator
zebraskittles11
Con (against)
Tied
0 Points
The Contender
Zeuschild
Pro (for)
Tied
0 Points

DNA Database

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Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 4/14/2014 Category: Science
Updated: 3 years ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 1,197 times Debate No: 52514
Debate Rounds (5)
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zebraskittles11

Con

In Maryland of 2009, Alonzo King was pulled over for a possible DUI, having a DNA sample taken upon arrest. Later on, after he was released with misdemeanor, was again imprisoned for the felony of rape. How did they know he was a criminal of a rape case? According to King's attorney, the police who had arrested him had taken a sample of DNA. The National Institute of Justice claims that Maryland has to have judicial determination of probable cause, warrant, formal indictment or arraignment prior to collection of analysis. The police had none of the listed requirements but had taken samples upon arrest. Another factor is that the only way to know King was a suspect of this case was if the DNA sample taken was put into a database instead of disposing of the sample. The National Institute of Justice also stated that Maryland has to have a required, state-initiated expunge of DNA. The evidence used was enough to say the DNA was not admissible.
This is not the only way to find the government can take your DNA without consent and keep it for further uses. Biological samples like blood, tissue, and organ donations. The DNA in those samples can be analyzed without knowledge. This can cause the DNA to database to continue growing with clueless donors.
Zeuschild

Pro

it helps solve crimes
according to ehow.com it is like matching fingerprints except fingerprinting takes judgment, skill and training. Having a dna database makes it easier for anyone to identify who is innocent or guilty. If it is easier for people to identify the perpetrator then more people will be thrown in jail which would make the world that much safer
councilofresponsiblegenetics.org states that having a dna database can be used to bring in new suspects or reveal suspects. So if the police think only four people committed the crime if they run all the dna in the database they could find out they were one off. This would make sure that the police are not letting one person go accidentally
according to nin.gov having a dna database can draw authorities away from unproductive cases. This would make sure that there are police who are ready to help with any case. If police are working on unproductive cases they aren"t helping anyone with anything including the victims of the unproductive case.
Debate Round No. 1
zebraskittles11

Con

As privacy becomes a large issue in the DNA database argument, thoughts like "How is my DNA being secured?" appear. As a growing mass of people begin to agree with DNA data basing, another popular group is people who believe it infringes the human right. However, both groups have one thing in common neither group has security over their DNA after it"s released. As easy as it may be to gain DNA samples in a lab, it is also easy to gain samples in a normal work day. A common technique used by the FBI to gain DNA samples is to follow the possible suspect around for many days and collect eligible samples to analyze. This is common to find if a family member is a criminal as opposed to the person being follow being the actual criminal. When a person throws away a cup of coffee or a tissue, an investigator will retrieve and preserve the evidence until in the lab. Once the evidence is gathered, compared to DNA already available from the suspect at the crime scene, there is a verdict of relationship. Is the person an undercover FBI man is following, a spouse, parent, child or other terms of relation connected to the suspect? This long process raises questions of how secure a home, family and life may actually be.
George Church, a Harvard geneticist, stated to an interviewer that the DNA database can be broken. As more and more genes are added to the genetic library, more and more people will want to access secrets kept tight. Along with the desire to unlock the vaults combination, the combination becomes easier to read. "If you believe you can just encrypt terabytes of data or anonymize them, there will always be people who hack through that."

http://www.ihealthbeat.org...
http://www.brighthub.com...
Zeuschild

Pro

It could herald in a new age of medicine
according to bbc.com we could use it to avoid drugs known to be toxic to people with similar dna. This could potentially be life saving as drugs that do harm to people can kill them. If a doctor wants to prescribe medicine he could go into the database to see if there would be any drugs that could negatively affect them. This could insure that they do not harm the person and helps them
according to Sir John Bell it would be almost impossible to go into the personalized medicine agenda without this database. It would make it easier to take care of yourself if you were sick. It would also tell you which drugs would cause harm. This makes it easier for those who distrust hospitals to take care of themselves.
ctvnews.ca says you can use the databases to identify mysterious disorders. This would help people like Barb Williams, whose son Noah is not able to talk or walk to identify the disorders and maybe see how to deal with it. This would possible put people minds at ease if it was non-life threatening or it could tell you how many years they have left if it is life threatening
Debate Round No. 2
zebraskittles11

Con

Accuracy on things these days, like tests and how much money your friend owes you is important in this world. So would keeping accuracy on comparing DNA and keeping track of the DNA gain be important too? In Arizona of 2001, Kathryn Troyer, a crime lab analyzer, ran tests on Arizona"s DNA database when she saw genes of two felons that almost matched. They matched 9 out of the 13 locations on a chromosomes, or loci. Loci are usually used to compare DNA because they are easily distinguishable. The FBI estimated the odds of finding unrelated people having similar genetic loci to be 1 in 113 billion. Troyer found the felons were unrelated and of different races. Troyer has found dozens of similar "matches," showing that the accuracy of the base isn"t as clear as thought. When Troyer discovered this, many states looked for only 9 or fewer loci when looking for suspects (most try to compare 13 loci when evidence is reasonable). Troyer and her colleagues believed that a 9-locus match could mislead investigators to finding the wrong person. "We felt it was interesting and just wanted people to understand it could happen," Troyer explained. "If you"re going to search at nine loci, you need to be aware of what it means. It"s not necessarily absolutely the guy," added Troyer"s colleague, Phoenix Lab Director, Todd Griffith.
Inspired by these findings, defense attorney Bicka Barlow sought to find out if there might be other matches in a DNA database. She started a new search of the Arizona database, she found that there was 122 individuals that matched at the same 9 of the 13 loci with 20 people that matched 10 out of 65,000 felons. So it can"t be all that secure if many of the flaws are getting through.

http://www.deathpenaltyinfo.org...
Zeuschild

Pro

it is incredibly accurate
according to alrc.gov.au as long as you have good quality and quantity dna they are very accurate. This doesn"t mean you need all of the dna. You just need enough good quality dna to match it to the person. As long as the criminal doesn"t have an identical twin or the authorities have lots of good quality dna the right person will be punished.
according to justice.gov many cases have been solved using dna database. This would have to mean that the dna is accurate because if it wasn"t and the government kept arresting the wrong people they would eventually stop. The whole point of the police is to keep us safe and if the database didn"t work it wouldn"t keep us safe and so they would stop using it.
according to forensicscience.gov there is only a one tenth of a percent chance that the database will get it wrong. Nothing is perfect and so this will not always get it right but there is such a slim chance it is almost 100 percent accurate. Also blood banks sometimes give AIDS infected blood but for the most part it is accurate and so we don"t worry about that.
Debate Round No. 3
zebraskittles11

Con

Like many issues in this world, the expansion of DNA data basing has its social repercussions. One of the major social problems is that it may deepen racial bias in the criminal justice system. Leading to the distrust of minorities towards law enforcement. Minority groups in the US are afraid that disparate arrests will lead to a lot of minorities being forced into the data base. The forensic method could worsen an already existing racial bias in the system, said Rori Rohlfs, a statistical geneticist at the University of California, Berkeley. Because the database contains proportionately more DNA from African-Americans and Latinos, this causes more law enforcement to attack those races because of bias. In other words, "That raises the possibility that police would subject people of color to more scrutiny than those in the white population." Said Rori.

http://news.yahoo.com...
Zeuschild

Pro

It can identify people
according to the missing person"s bureau dna can be extracted from either an unidentified person or the remains of said person and run them through the database of missing persons dna to see who it is. If this is done it is easier to tell where someone went. And you could call the family to tell them where to pick them up or to stop worrying because they are dead.
Bode technology says that having a dna database can be used to identify victims of a disaster. This could put someone"s mind at ease because they don"t have to worry about the persons help. If a certain person is not one of the dead then the family would know if the person is alive or just not found yet.
It can also identify a person"s parents according to dna-testing-advisor.com. This could help adoptees identify their families and keep in contact with them. It would also help them to figure out why their families gave them up which could give them self-worth
Debate Round No. 4
zebraskittles11

Con

Like everything you have ever owned, there is a large price tag for DNA data basing. As a form of globalization of having a DNA database, the topic takes the price of the United Kingdom database. Home Office figures state that the cost of running the national DNA database has doubled since 2002-03.
Meg Hillier MP, said that in 2002-03, the cost of DNA database services was "774,300 ($1,294,939). That service and IT development delivery costs for 2008-09 were predicted to be "1.77m ($2,960,148). In 2006-07, that amount reached "2.04m ($3,411,696), but it dropped to "1.6m ($2,675,034) last year.
Hillier said that the numbers from 2006-07 and years after are higher, because the database's costs have been separated from the Forensic Science Service. This also caused another increase in money because of the high demand of forensic suppliers required extra spending on accreditation and monitoring.
Supplier accreditation rose from "321,000 ($536,679) in 2002-03 to an estimated "750,000 ($1,253,922) in 2008-09. The total cost of the database for the current financial year is planned to reach "2.52m ($4,213,179) compared to "1.09m ($1,822,367) in 2002-03.
Hiller also revealed that in April this year that the database had almost 350,000 sample DNA from children and teens aged 10 to 17. "There are more profiles than individuals, due to DNA samples being taken from some individuals on more than one occasion," she said. "It is estimated that the current rate of profile replication is about 13.3%." Because of the constant collection of data, the costs will continue to rise and will be harder to keep up with.
Zeuschild

Pro

having a dna database can help prevent certain diseases
exploredna.co.uk says that we are now able to tell if people are at an increased risk for heart disease. This is because they have found telomeres that are only found on people with an increased risk of the disease. If they had a database they could be able to tell who would be at increased risk and thereby tell them how to try to make sure they do not get heart disease. This would be a more effective way than waiting until they get heart disease and telling them which medications to take.
abc.net.au says that a massive dna database has generated a map of switches that cause many things from hair loss to cancer. This has opened the door to revolutionary treatment for many diseases. If we had a dna database of everyone in the world we might be able to treat all the diseases we have on earth. This would make it so we could focus more on things like clean energy and space travel
pulsenet.com states that using a dna database they have been able to detect and define outbreaks. Because they are able to define the outbreaks they are better able to try to find a cure. If we can predict a disease before it starts many, many lives could be saved
Debate Round No. 5
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