The Instigator
Garipa
Pro (for)
Tied
3 Points
The Contender
InVinoVeritas
Con (against)
Tied
3 Points

Dance

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Post Voting Period
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after 2 votes the winner is...
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Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 1/18/2012 Category: Arts
Updated: 5 years ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 1,706 times Debate No: 20471
Debate Rounds (3)
Comments (2)
Votes (2)

 

Garipa

Pro

Pro Popping.

I believe that popping is one of the best solo dance styles that one could learn because it teaches the student about body control.
InVinoVeritas

Con

I believe that the Melbourne Shuffle is a superior solo dance style to Popping.

Why? Because it is extremely fast-paced and has a strong, captivating visual effect on the audience. The smoothness of the glides and change in position are graceful and powerful. Also, it matches the style of accompanying music (usually hard trance or hardstyle) perfectly, with each glide matching the timing of the bass.

Debate Round No. 1
Garipa

Pro

You've made some valid points about the smoothness of the glides and the changes in position being powerful.

However, I must say, looking at the video provided you will see that popping also requires a smooth and flowing glide system. This gliding system is the basics (after actual popping of course). You must know how to glide due to the fact that while popping you can't just simply walk around, your movements must be smooth. Since most of the Melbourne Shuffle is centered on gliding I would have to say that your argument is invalid (regarding gliding). You've also said "...it's captivating visual effect on the audience.". Can you honestly watch the video I have provided and say that it does not capture the visual effect of any audience? You've also said "...each glide matching the timing of the bass." When popping you must be able to dance not only to the bass but also to the main synth pattern. You've mentioned that it is a fast paced dance style, Melbourne shuffle. So is popping, if you refer to the video, at the time 1:25 you will see that popping is also faced pace. You've also said "Also, it matches the style of accompanying music (usually hard trance or hardstyle) perfectly..." Are you implying that genre of music is made specifically for Melbourne Shuffle? If you are I ask of you to post a song that I will personally pop to, to show you that it is possible to pop to any genre of music.

tl;dr - You can pop to anything, any pace/bpm, requires gliding smoothly, captures attention, speed adjustable, challenge accepted - I will pop to any song.
InVinoVeritas

Con

The Melbourne Shuffle is not just gliding. The base step is the "running man," which one could call a glide of sorts. But after that, many advanced techniques can be learned, such as kicks and spins. This combination of smooth gliding with strong kicks and spins are very visually appealing.

Popping may be suitable for a large number of genres, but that does not make it better. The video that the opponent posted was appealing for the wrong reasons... I did not watch it as a dance, but rather as I would watch a magician. The movements are interesting and difficult to master, but they do not create a fluid dance that matches the track. To me, popping is just impressive because of its "magic" movements rather than its dance appeal.

Melbourne Shuffle, however, perfectly matches the intensity of the genres it usually accompanies. The volume and power of the bass in hardstyle and hard trance tracks (which are known for their strong bass sounds) perfectly matches the powerful glides of the dancer. Also, the dance is very fluid and smooth, so it is easy to watch and enjoy.

After watching popping, someone says, "Whoa... That guy did some crazy movements." After watching the Melbourne Shuffle, someone says, "Wow, now that's a cool dance that matches this genre of music."

Debate Round No. 2
Garipa

Pro

The main argument of the second paragraph is "...popping is just impressive because of its 'magic' movements..." However, the Melbourne Shuffle also includes what looks like "magic" movements. While dancing you "step" or "stomp" in a forward direction, however your body moves backwards.

Your debate in the third paragraph just reinstates your first response, as seen in the first debate -> "Also, it matches the style of accompanying music (usually hard trance or hardstyle) perfectly, with each glide matching the timing of the bass. Your last statement was "After watching popping, someone says, 'Whoa... That guy did some crazy movements.' After watching the Melbourne Shuffle, someone says, 'Wow, now that's a cool dance that matches this genre of music.'" Not necessarily. I am a street performer and the reactions I've received were very vast but mostly comments about how my popping goes amazing with the music I perform to. So once again, you're implying that one can only dance to hard and heavy bass genres of music. However with popping you can choose any genre.

To the general audience the Melbourne Shuffle looks very repetitive. However, popping has many variations. If you refer to my video, you will see that the first scene of the video includes Liquid Style Popping, at 0:53 you will see Gliding mixed in with Liquid, and at 1:45 you will see Isolation and Bone Popping (aka True Popping). Every popper has their own style of popping, ie: Bone Breaking, unlike the Melbourne Shuffle in which you must combine a certain set of moves such as the T-Step, the Running man, Glides, and Spins. Also, in your first paragraph you stated "...such as kicks and spins." In the Melbourne Shuffle one does not kick, if kicking were to be mixed in with the Melbourne Shuffle it would easily be turned into a modified version of Jumpstyle. Technically you are not kicking, you're extending your leg and touching the ground with either toe or heel, which ever is more appropriate to combine a previous movement with your next one. A kick requires your foot to stay off the ground (see Jumpstyle dance as example : ). As you can see from the video provided as a link along with the Jumpstyle example, a kick is when your foot extends and does not touch the ground.

My first argument was body control. As we have debated the voters can easily see that the Melbourne Shuffle only teaches you about leg and foot control. However, Popping teaches the performer about full body control with gliding, isolation, bone breaking, tutting, botting, and many more. Gliding teaches foot control (see example : ) . Isolation teaches the performer control over almost all the joints in the human body. Bone Breaking teaches control over the dislocate-able joint of the body (see link for example : ). Tutting teaches the performer wrist, knuckle, and finger control (See Example : ). Botting, the most common type of popping, it teaches the performer control over breathing and muscle control (see example : ).

So once again, to restate my original debate, popping is one of the best solo dances one could learn because it teaches about complete body control.
InVinoVeritas

Con

The Melbourne shuffle does not consist of "magic" movements. Popping involves a ridiculous amount of variation (i.e., neck shifting to arm waving to chest waving... and so on) for the sole purpose of evoking "oooh aaahs" in the crowd. The basic foundation of the Melbourne Shuffle is repetitive and fluid (although complex techniques can eventually be mastered.)


I believe that each genre of music deserves its own individual dance to match its intensity, rhythm, and style. Saying that popping can be used for any genre of music just shows that the dance lacks identity; it is unable to match the characteristics of a certain genre (due to its "magical," non-dance nature, as I stated prior.) Hardstyle is, should we say, tailored for the hardstyle/hard trance field of music; the movements match the typical musical characteristics of the genre (e.g., power gliding for the hard bass.)


The opponent claims: "To the general audience the Melbourne Shuffle looks very repetitive." Only if the performer is a novice. There are many, many tricks to learn. When one watches videos of pros doing the shuffle, one sees the complex nature of the dance. There are arm motions involved that greatly complement the gliding and needs to be synchronized with it. Moreover, there are different leg motions that can be performed which can be clearly distinguished during a performance.


The Melbourne Shuffle is not just about leg and foot control. As I said, it involves arm movements and hip rotation. Successfully gliding takes a lot more than just the "running man." That's only the first step for learning how to Melbourne Shuffle. There are a huge variety of moves that can be learned.
Debate Round No. 3
2 comments have been posted on this debate. Showing 1 through 2 records.
Posted by InVinoVeritas 5 years ago
InVinoVeritas
Whether I win or not, I will certainly be "filled with joy." :) Indeed, this was a great debate.
Posted by Garipa 5 years ago
Garipa
This was a great debate. I congratulate you. May the winner be filled with joy.
2 votes have been placed for this debate. Showing 1 through 2 records.
Vote Placed by Double_R 5 years ago
Double_R
GaripaInVinoVeritasTied
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Total points awarded:30 
Reasons for voting decision: There really was no resolution, so determining a winner is entirely subjective. I found Popping to be quite entertaining to watch, and I was amazed at the level of full body control the performer had. It certainly does not look like a dance anyone can learn to do well. The Melbourne Shuffle might have more potential but I really didn't see that in anything Con said or showed.
Vote Placed by Stephen_Hawkins 5 years ago
Stephen_Hawkins
GaripaInVinoVeritasTied
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Total points awarded:03 
Reasons for voting decision: I think Vitro did better, but square dancing still trumps all.