The Instigator
logands
Con (against)
Tied
0 Points
The Contender
tiffanyands
Pro (for)
Tied
0 Points

Did William Shakespeare belong to a religion? If so, what was it?

Do you like this debate?NoYes+0
Add this debate to Google Add this debate to Delicious Add this debate to FaceBook Add this debate to Digg  
Post Voting Period
The voting period for this debate has ended.
after 0 votes the winner is...
It's a Tie!
Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 4/1/2014 Category: Education
Updated: 3 years ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 373 times Debate No: 51403
Debate Rounds (4)
Comments (1)
Votes (0)

 

logands

Con

No, Shakespeare alludes to multiple religions throughout all of his works. He also gives quotes to show that Religion has not aided him in anyway. For example, when King Claudius from Hamlet bursts into prayer in Hamlet (III. iii. 36)
tiffanyands

Pro

Writers often try not to allude to the fact that they have a specific religion because it may persuade readers not to take interests in their writing solely because of their belief system. Shakespeare lived in an era where having a religion was almost a guarantee, so it is highly unlikely that he does not categorize himself under a specific religion. He merely hides his personal religious beliefs to expand his audience.
Debate Round No. 1
logands

Con

Yes but if Shakespeare were to want to captivate more people who, in this time, would almost always be apart of the same religion then why would he need to hide it? In a lot of other writing from this time period the author talks mainly of one religion and that is Protestantism. Why would Shakespeare not write about Protestantism more if that were the most dominant religion of his time? This give me more reason to believe that he did not belong to a specific religion.
tiffanyands

Pro

tiffanyands forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 2
logands

Con

logands forfeited this round.
tiffanyands

Pro

tiffanyands forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 3
logands

Con

logands forfeited this round.
tiffanyands

Pro

tiffanyands forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 4
1 comment has been posted on this debate.
Posted by logands 3 years ago
logands
Oh, my offence is rank. It smells to heaven.
It hath the primal eldest curse upon "t,
A brother"s murder. Pray can I not.
Though inclination be as sharp as will,
My stronger guilt defeats my strong intent,
And, like a man to double business bound,
I stand in pause where I shall first begin,
And both neglect. What if this curs"d hand
Were thicker than itself with brother"s blood?
Is there not rain enough in the sweet heavens
To wash it white as snow? Whereto serves mercy
But to confront the visage of offence?
And what"s in prayer but this twofold force,
To be forestall"d ere we come to fall
Or pardoned being down? Then I"ll look up.
My fault is past. But oh, what form of prayer
Can serve my turn, "Forgive me my foul murder"?That cannot be, since I am still possessed
Of those effects for which I did the murder:
My crown, mine own ambition, and my queen.
May one be pardoned and retain th' offense?
In the corrupted currents of this world
Offense"s gilded hand may shove by justice,
And oft "tis seen the wicked prize itself
Buys out the law. But "tis not so above.
There is no shuffling. There the action lies
In his true nature, and we ourselves compelled,
Even to the teeth and forehead of our faults,
To give in evidence. What then? What rests?
Try what repentance can. What can it not?
Yet what can it when one can not repent?
O wretched state! O bosom black as death!
O lim"d soul that, struggling to be free,
Art more engaged! Help, angels. Make assay.
Bow, stubborn knees, and, heart with strings of steel,
Be soft as sinews of the newborn babe.
All may be well. (kneels)
No votes have been placed for this debate.