The Instigator
cmolliconemsc2014
Con (against)
Losing
0 Points
The Contender
swiszczmsc2014
Pro (for)
Winning
4 Points

Disney Princesses as Role Models

Do you like this debate?NoYes+2
Add this debate to Google Add this debate to Delicious Add this debate to FaceBook Add this debate to Digg  
Post Voting Period
The voting period for this debate has ended.
after 1 vote the winner is...
swiszczmsc2014
Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 11/7/2013 Category: Movies
Updated: 3 years ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 4,546 times Debate No: 40121
Debate Rounds (5)
Comments (10)
Votes (1)

 

cmolliconemsc2014

Con

Disney Princesses have been around for nearly 80 years and have had major effects on young girls, who are the main targeted audience of the movies. The fairy tales that the Disney Company has based their princess movies off of are originally gruesome tales which are rooted in evil and revenge. The way Disney has made them "appropriate" for young girls is by changing the main characters into stereotypical Barbie-doll type women. These "princesses" are usually defiant towards authority and willing to do anything just to get a man to notice them. One even went far enough to change her physical nature and leave her family and home to pursue a man she did not even know. These rebellious women are the ones that young girls have looked up to for generations and I think it needs to change.
swiszczmsc2014

Pro

Disney princesses have, in fact, often been portrayed as stereotypical "perfect" young women as far as their appearances go. However, in recent years, Disney has broken away from these Barbie-doll type figures and given children the new idea that princesses come in all shapes and sizes. Merida, for example, is presented with untamed, frizzy hair and a hatred for overly feminine clothing, but we are constantly reminded of the beauty of her uniqueness throughout the film "Brave." Although many of the other princesses are portrayed with an idealistic image, it is important to remember that in most cases, the heroine or main female character in any movie, cartoon or live-action, Disney or not, is similarly represented in a nearly perfect way. Most importantly, the intended focus of Disney princess movies is not the beauty or perfection of the princess, but rather her bravery, kindness, strength, etc. If overcoming obstacles that endanger a princess or the people she cares about requires her to be defiant, so be it. But in many instances, this defiance is directed toward the stereotypes women frequently face. Mulan fights in place of her father to save his life, something considered unacceptable for a woman to do. Jasmine insists on choosing her own suitor, regardless of the fact that a woman in her location and time period was expected to agree to marry whomever was chosen for her. Belle refuses to marry Gaston, an arrogant, disrespectful man who admired her only for her looks. In my opinion, the Disney company has not created stereotypes, but broken them.
Debate Round No. 1
cmolliconemsc2014

Con

Disney has most certainly not broken away from the Barbie-doll figures. Just because they gave a princess big frizzy hair does not imply that princesses come in all shapes and sizes; Merida's waist is still smaller than that of a normal woman's and so are all the other princess'. Not once has there been a princess with the characteristics of a normal person, never mind an overweight one. In fact, almost all of the overweight characters in Disney movies often end up being the evil character. For example, Ursula from The Little Mermaid and Governor Ratcliffe from Pocahontas are the essential villains from their respective movies and are both overweight. Also, you say that the princesses worked against the stereotypes women face but in reality they add fuel to these stereotypes. Princess Ariel left her whole family and everything she ever knew to change herself so that a man she did not even know would notice her. So many of the girls that admire Ariel believe that it is okay to change yourself and lie to a man to get him to fall in love with you. And Belle, she seemingly falls in love with the beast for what? His charming looks and great personality? Seeing as he had neither of those, it was probably for that giant castle he had. Her story teaches young girls to marry the man with the most money, regardless of his looks or cruelties, because they are the ones with the best libraries. Cinderella teaches your daughters that if you do your chores and are obedient, Prince Charming will come and take you away, essentially saying that the only thing to strive for in life is to get married. It is obvious how materialistic and anti-feminist these princesses are, so why would anyone want their children looking up to them?
swiszczmsc2014

Pro

First of all, overweight characters in Disney movies are not always evil, and evil characters are not always overweight. For example, the fairy godmother in Cinderella, the sultan in Aladdin, and Belle's father in Beauty and the Beast are all what our society would consider to be "overweight," and yet they are far from evil. On the other hand, the stepmother in Cinderella, Jafar in Aladdin, and Maleficent in Sleeping Beauty are all thin, but they are still inherently evil. Moving onto your other arguments, Ariel does not change herself to get prince Eric to fall in love with her. He already is in love with her when she saves him from drowning in her mermaid form. She becomes a human in order to chase after her love, and becoming a human is the only way to do so. Belle's story does not in any form teach girls to "marry the man with the most money." It teaches girls to see the good in others, despite looks and past wrongdoings. The library the beast gives to Belle is a symbol of his generosity, not a bribe to get her to fall in love with him. Belle is not superficial at all. If anything, she is to be commended for her ability to find the positives in any situation.
Debate Round No. 2
cmolliconemsc2014

Con

I see what you are saying but I disagree completely. The princesses are superficial beings, who are dependent on their princes for them to be a person. They teach children that women are meant for one thing: to accompany a man. They must grab the prince's attention first however, be it by glorious singing by Snow White, Aurora, or Ariel, or by being beautiful like Cinderella, Jasmine, and Belle (AKA Beauty). This is essentially teaching the young girls of society that you MUST be either drop dead gorgeous or an amazing singer for you to end up happy with your "prince". And to continue with that, the princess movies Disney has presented all end with the prince and princess getting married, basically saying that life ends when you get married. Only two of the princesses, Cinderella and Ariel, have follow-up movies of what their life was like after marriage, and neither of those movies where as popular as their original films. Moving onto a different subject, the movie Aladdin shows that, even if your fiance lies to you about who he is the whole time you are engaged, it is okay and that you should marry him anyways. In fact, the movie even makes Aladdin seem cool so then children think it is a-okay to lie about things because hey, if Aladdin can lie and steal and still get to marry a princess and have a pet monkey, nothing bad can happen.
swiszczmsc2014

Pro

There is not one Disney princess movie in which the goal is to find a prince and marry him. The princesses all find love unexpectedly and live happily ever after. The movies do not begin with each princess on a mission to marry the prince of their choice. Rapunzel wants to leave her tower and see the floating lanterns on her birthday, but a twist of fate leads her to the man she marries, Flynn Rider. Belle wants a unique life and finds the Beast when she is trying to rescue her father. Mulan meets Shang upon fighting to save her father's life. Ariel never fits in under the sea and discovers that she feels happy on land with her prince. Tiana is working to open the restaurant her late father had dreamed of opening in the years when he was alive. NONE of these princesses had a prince on their mind at the beginning of their respective movies. As for the endings of movies, it is true that they end with a happily ever after and a perfect marriage, but think about it. How many movies in America end with a happy ending and a completed love story? A lot. There is of course life after marriage, but people are typically more interested in seeing the actions that lead up to love. And Aladdin's lying is in fact a problem. That is why he almost loses princess Jasmine. He is barely even able to gain her forgiveness. The point that he is a liar is emphasized throughout the movie and teaches kids that lying is wrong. Aside from that, there is no correlation between having a pet monkey and bad things happening.
Debate Round No. 3
cmolliconemsc2014

Con

cmolliconemsc2014 forfeited this round.
swiszczmsc2014

Pro

Good comeback.
Debate Round No. 4
cmolliconemsc2014

Con

To close my argument, I would like to say that, according to recent studies and statistics, Disney Princesses hurt more than they help. They are over-obedient young women who show girls that they should be subservient and that men are the dominant sex. Because young children are usually the target audience of all these movies, their minds are not fully formed when they first see them and grow up thinking that everything will be handed to them in life. It may seem harsh to say, but life is not easy and it is not right to make children believe that life is flawless and if things do get hard there will be a fairy-godmother or a genie or a magic triton to save the day. We should not feed the ideas of magic wands and mermaids and enchanted castles constantly through our children's brains; Sure, it is okay to dream, but they should understand that this is not reality.
swiszczmsc2014

Pro

There is nothing wrong with dreaming. It gives us goals and hopes for the future. Disney princesses, as I stated earlier, defeat stereotypes and depart from the view that men are dominant. Merida refuses to have a husband chosen for her, as does Jasmine. These movies are excellent examples of women defying gender roles.

Aside from your poor arguments, I believe the Rapunzel backpack that you sport so confidently shows that even you cannot be convinced of the opinion that Disney princesses are poor role models. Perhaps you should also rid your locker of the princess magnets plastered everywhere.

Disney princesses are beautiful and confident and driven and strong and dreamers and caring and selfless women.

The end.
Debate Round No. 5
10 comments have been posted on this debate. Showing 1 through 10 records.
Posted by MainhattanMaus 3 years ago
MainhattanMaus
Also I hate it when everyone bashes Disney Princesses for having an hourglass figure. Since when is it so evil to encourage young women and men for that matter, (No one ever mentions that Disney PRINCES are just as sexy as their female counterparts) to have a nice figure? That's just called physical fitness. It doesn't have to have this extreme hidden meaning that is brainwashing the population into believeing no one will ever love them unless they look exactly like a Disney Princess. I do not believe that was Disney's intention. If anything their only intention was to create good looking charachters because that's just part of the story. Based on ancient tales and epics involving larger than life charachters who incidentally, are not ugly. How many fairy tales do you read about fat, ugly princes and princesses? Not many. That's just part of the fairy tale and entertainment bizz, and even within the fairy tales there are plenty of other characters in loving relationships and marriages, who are nonetheless not perfect looking, but it shouldn't be about looking "perfect" anyway. Just having a nice figure and wearing a little makeup. What is so evil about that?
Posted by MainhattanMaus 3 years ago
MainhattanMaus
I love these Disney Princess debates. So fascinating. After reading several of them I'd also have to say I agree more with the side that says Disney Princesses are kick-butt, but the Anti-Princess Coalitions are also correct ON SOME POINTS. Those being that Disney princesses twist little girls' idea of what love is and how it works. Too many disney movies portray love as something which just majically happens at the moment of first sight, rather than something which develops over time. Ariel is the most extreme example of this. Although I agree with pro about Ariel and her prince both falling in love at first sight, and that falling in love was not the goal of ANY Disney princess at the start of any disney princess movie(which is good), I still don't think that the extremes Ariel went to just to win her prince were right. No matter how in love they were Ariel could have surely thought of a way to catch the princes' attention that didn't involve abandoning her parents and signing a deal with the Sea Witch Ursula. Then again, if she had done the responsible thing, then The Little Mermaid would not have been a very entertaining Disney Movie would it? :P Which is what makes it important not to take Disney Princess movies too seriously, and even more importantly, not to let our children watching them take them too seriously. As long as we let our kids know after they've seen the movie, "Hey kid. It's just a movie and it's meant to be entertaining, not to teach you who to be or what life and love are all about. That is what us parents, school, and the community are for." then I feel pretty confident that we can trust our kids to be smart enough to figure out for themselves. Of course Disney princesses are great examples in many respects; courage, selflessness, loyalty ect.... The only thing I don't like about them honestly is that they ALWAYS have to have a prince, which makes me all the happier that Brave came out. FINALLY a Disney Princess story that isn't a love story.
Posted by abbeyshannon 3 years ago
abbeyshannon
Both sides made valid points and a good argument. I think the pro side of the argument won because all little girls look up to the Disney princesses and many of them enjoy dressing like them but many of them look up to what they do and how they portray themselves.
Posted by Duncanmsc2014 3 years ago
Duncanmsc2014
I believe that the pro side won this debate because Disney princesses are very good role models for girls everywhere. Although one can see the point the con side is trying to make, the con side is over thinking the true meaning of Disney princesses. The pro side also uses great examples to prove their point.
Posted by Mikal 3 years ago
Mikal
Pro wins this debate. S&G is bad from both sides and conduct is awarded to pro due to a FF. No sources from either contender and Pro always takes arguments. Con starts off with stating that Disney makes princesses perfect and gives girl unrealistic role models. Pro refutes this with the fact, Disney has started to branch out from this and uses brave as an example. Con says they have not and uses the little mermaid as an example ( this is way before brave, so this does not counter pros point about recent branching out). This was also in response to Pros claim about Belle refusing to marry Gaston in Beauty and the Beast because of him being arrogant and wealthy and choosing love over this. Pro hits a hard point on this, and this is when con counters with the little mermaid. Which was a great rebuttal. Con says recent studies show Disney portraying women this way effects young girls poorly. This is not cited so its dismissed. Pro point on Disney branching out stands and remains non refuted. All Con really had to do was point out the fact of girls looking up to overly idolized women or what not. Even focus on the impacts of unrealistic expectations and he had a shot. He argued it poorly and left a contention from Pro untouched. Therefore arguments and conduct con.
Posted by SegersMSC2014 3 years ago
SegersMSC2014
I agree that while Disney princesses are fun to want to be like, it is unrealistic. It gives false hope to young girls and can affect them when they grow older. Although good entertainment, in the long run it can cause more harm than good.
Posted by bauersachsmsc2014 3 years ago
bauersachsmsc2014
I totally agree with the instigator. Disney has created an unrealistic image in young girls mind's. I being a victim of this image, belived that in order for me to find my handsome prince I had to be able to sing, have an incredible talent, and be drop dead beautiful. It is not real life and is sending the wrong message.
Posted by kristinkleya 3 years ago
kristinkleya
I agree with the pro side because I think Disney wants their princesses to be liked by their actions not looks. I also think the pro side had many good examples backing up their point.
Posted by deermsc2014 3 years ago
deermsc2014
Although both sides have good points, the pro side is what Disney intended for Princesses to be like. The con side is over analyzing it. The pro side is coming back at every point with excellent details and examples. Very entertaining debate.
Posted by feeleymsc2014 3 years ago
feeleymsc2014
So far in this argument I agree with the pro side. Although the con offers interesting points, the pro is able to not only disagree on the subject, but dispel it and prove her own point. I think that this is especially evident during the weight argument which comes up in round two.
1 votes has been placed for this debate.
Vote Placed by Mikal 3 years ago
Mikal
cmolliconemsc2014swiszczmsc2014Tied
Agreed with before the debate:--Vote Checkmark0 points
Agreed with after the debate:--Vote Checkmark0 points
Who had better conduct:-Vote Checkmark-1 point
Had better spelling and grammar:--Vote Checkmark1 point
Made more convincing arguments:-Vote Checkmark-3 points
Used the most reliable sources:--Vote Checkmark2 points
Total points awarded:04 
Reasons for voting decision: RFD in comments