The Instigator
Moderig
Pro (for)
Tied
0 Points
The Contender
4586
Con (against)
Tied
0 Points

Do We Really Need All The Education We Get Today?

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Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 2/5/2016 Category: Education
Updated: 1 year ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 438 times Debate No: 86083
Debate Rounds (3)
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Moderig

Pro

You know that day when you always go to school, and learn things that your friends consider "boring?" Well, then it must be. In my opinion, a good percentage of what we learn, is something we never use. Why do you need to know about King Tut- when are we going to use that information? This just wastes a good percentage of our time, and it's also something we'll never use.
4586

Con

I accept this debate challenge. It seems that your stance is that you are opposed to most of the things learned in school( such as "King Tut"). I would like to point out that if we only taught applied topics like chemistry, kids who are more interested in things like history and art may become apathetic to all of education and drop out. I look forward to Round 2.
Debate Round No. 1
Moderig

Pro

How are they going to drop out for learning something that's even more boring? It's like me saying I'd be sad if I ate ice cream that didn't have any calories! My statement is that it's a better idea to cut on the boring stuff that will never be used as a real world problem, such as what I used as an example, King Tut. They're not cutting something that's fun, because I don't think anyone would enjoy extra 5 hours of work that's not needed.
4586

Con

"How are they going to drop out for learning something that's even more boring?"
Imagine you are a kid living in an impoverished family. It's hard for you to get to school, but you do and you try your best. This is because when you were little, you went to the public library and looked at the biography section. You read about all of those people who were criticized and ridiculed at first, but eventually became wonders. You thought that if they could succeed, you could too. Those people of the past gave you the spark of hope to keep going. Now imagine we never taught "boring" history. Those biographies would never have been written. You would never have any ambition when it comes to academics. Most likely, you would fall into a depression and drop out or at least get much worse grades.
"It's a better idea to cut on the boring stuff that will never be used as a real world problem."
Maybe history and other "boring" topics won't be used by engineers, but they will be used in books. People write about history all the time, and many people make a living writing books related to history.
"They're not cutting something that's fun."
A lot of kids find King Tut very interesting. He was a young king from ancient Egypt whose death is a mystery, and whose tomb remained undiscovered for thousands of years. If history was boring, the historical fiction genre wouldn't exist.
"I don't think anyone would enjoy extra 5 hours of work that's not needed."
Many people in my class think math is boring. Replacing 5 hours of Humanities with 5 hours of algebra would, to those people, substantially increase how boring school is. Something being interesting doesn't necessarily correlate with something being the most profitable. Also, are you talking about 5 hours per day, or per week?
In summary, cutting everything that can't be used in a physics lab is not always the best option. You have to consider the fact that humans are more complex than a computer waiting to be programmed. We all need something to keep us going, and for some people, math and science isn't enough.
Debate Round No. 2
Moderig

Pro

For your first point, you said that learning about people of the past inspire you. Your point was not about this topic, because you were talking about the library, and that's not something I was against with, so that's that. And yes, some people inspire you. But that should be in a different club after school for people that actually want to learn about other people- because I'm sure a good percentage of my class wouldn't want to learn about other figures.

"Maybe history and other boring topics won't be used by engineers, but they will be used in books."

I'm sure that we learn all of this on the higher grades, which means most people must have found what they have been interested in already, and again, there should be an after school club for this, because the chances of one whole class liking biography of books is 1/2189328807438.

"Many people in my class think math is boring. Replacing 5 hours of Humanities with 5 hours of algebra would, to those people, substantially increase how boring school is."

Only your school- I like math much more than language arts and social studies. I'd rather do a whole day of math. Just because your class doesn't like math doesn't mean every school should follow it. And yes, you are coorect. Humans are complex organisms who can be evil, or good. That's why they should be able to makes choices rather than being forced to do something. Some people want less "interesting" work to bring them up, and some of them want unneeded work to bring them up to be inspired. I want to have the choice of choosing one of those ways, not being forced to do one.
4586

Con

"You were talking about the library, and that's not something I was against with, so that's that."
If there were no history classes, no one would write about history. Students would assume that the constant stream of science is the only thing there is to learn. The libraries would be almost completely composed of science textbooks. While this system of education is slightly more practical, it is a very bleak world for people who do not like science.
"That should be in a different club after school for people that actually want to learn about other people."
Keep in mind that many schools cannot afford to fund an extracurricular activity for every student interested in history. Also, some kids cannot fit after school classes into their schedule, and would never have the opportunity to learn the things they love.
"I'm sure that we learn all of this on the higher grades, which means most people must have found what they have been interested in already"
So you wish to only cut "boring" topics in the lower grades? This is contradictory to what you said in Round 1:
"Why do you need to know about King Tut- when are we going to use that information?"
It seemed that you felt no need for education on history in any grade. Are you changing your mind? Also, as I said before, people will not find their true passion if they are only taught things that are unrelated to it. Elementary schoolers' minds are very impressionable; if they are not exposed to Humanities then it will be much harder for them to pick it up later, just like a 30-year-old trying to learn a new language.
"Only your school- I like math much more than language arts and social studies. I'd rather do a whole day of math."
That only describes you, not your school. Have you ever actually asked your classmates about what they like more? I, like you, prefer math over Humanities. However, many kids have told me they think math is utterly boring and have to resist falling asleep every time their math teacher starts talking. What about those people?
"I want to have the choice of choosing one of those ways, not being forced to do one."
When shall the students make these choices? In elementary school? It is very hard for someone that young to make a life changing decision like that and really know it is the right one. If you have them make the decision any older, they will already be robbed of years of learning about their passion, instead forced to participate in 6 years if science that to them will be useless.
In conclusion, we can't just reconstruct an entire school system to fit individual needs. Having an all science curriculum would inevitably put the kids who prefer Humanities at a disadvantage. We need art just as much as we need science. As I write I am listening to Beethoven's 5th symphony, which would not have existed under your proposal. In order to have fairness and equality in our school systems, we must provide a variety of options to students, not just STEM classes.
Debate Round No. 3
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