The Instigator
TruthGen
Pro (for)
Tied
0 Points
The Contender
deviak1000
Con (against)
Tied
0 Points

Does epigenetics have a big impact on evolution?

Do you like this debate?NoYes+0
Add this debate to Google Add this debate to Delicious Add this debate to FaceBook Add this debate to Digg  
Post Voting Period
The voting period for this debate has ended.
after 0 votes the winner is...
It's a Tie!
Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 9/1/2014 Category: Science
Updated: 2 years ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 760 times Debate No: 61147
Debate Rounds (5)
Comments (5)
Votes (0)

 

TruthGen

Pro

1st round: Accept the challenge
2nd round: Statements and main points for the defense of each side.
3rd round: Rebuttals
4th round: Second-round rebuttals
5th round: Conclusion (No new information or rebuttals)
deviak1000

Con

I accept!!
Debate Round No. 1
TruthGen

Pro

The old "Nature vs Nurture" debate is already dead. We now know that both are important for the formation of the phenotype and behaviour. Now, scientists have discovered a point of connection between genetics (aka nature) and the environment, and this point has biological basis.

Epigenetics is the study of changes in gene expression caused by certain base pairs in DNA, or RNA, being "turned off" or "turned on" again, through chemical reactions. In biology, and specifically genetics, epigenetics is mostly the study of heritable changes that are not caused by changes in the DNA sequence.

http://en.wikipedia.org...

Does this have a big impact on evolution? Of course.

In fact, 95% of diseases are caused by epigenetics.

In an experiment, Agouti pregnant rats (They suffered from a disease that made them obese, yellow-colored and made them have a tendency to cardiovascular diseases) were fed with chemicals that produced changes in epigenetic marks, turning the descendants into healthy, brown rats.

Just think for a moment:

Previously we would think that genetics would be the only one with importance, Lamarck's theory of evolution seemed completely flawed, but now we see that (even if Lamarck may have been a little extreme) the idea of the environment (and thus behaviour) influencing through epigenetic marks may be valid after all.

Now we can infer that this has some impact on evolution, since it alters the phenotype of descendants (and sometimes in a very powerful way).

How does this affect in a BIG way?

This already seems big but it can't get bigger if we consider the butterfly effect, how little changes can lead to huge differences in the future.

This cured rats could live for longer, breed more, leading to more possible genetic mutations over time that may have not taken place if these rats died sooner because of disease. Maybe even the new healthy rats would breed less with the agouti rats (would be more attracted towards healthier rats) and so these rat species may become two different species. These are not facts of course, but it's just a representation of how varied are the possibilities when you take the butterfly effect into consideration.

http://www.fasebj.org...
deviak1000

Con

deviak1000 forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 2
TruthGen

Pro

Well, i can't make any rebuttals so i'll proceed with some arguments.

We could consider epigenetics a bridge between genetics and the environment.

Survival depends on how the species phenotype adapts to the environment.
The species phenotype depends on both genetics and epigenetics as you can deduce from the information i've given before.

Survival -> Adaptation -> Genetics
-> Epigenetics

Which species evolve? Those that survive, that become adapted to the environment. Those that survive will keep on having genetic mutations and changes in epigenetic marks.
deviak1000

Con

deviak1000 forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 3
TruthGen

Pro

I suppose i could still give some more arguments but it doesn't make much sense since this looks more like a monologue rather than a debate.

I'll just repeat: Recent scientific discoveries prove that epigenetics has an important impact on species. Does it even make sense to contradict scientific proof? Mmm... that would be an interesting debate.
deviak1000

Con

deviak1000 forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 4
TruthGen

Pro

TruthGen forfeited this round.
deviak1000

Con

deviak1000 forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 5
5 comments have been posted on this debate. Showing 1 through 5 records.
Posted by Osiris_Rosenthorne 2 years ago
Osiris_Rosenthorne
Well, I would be inclined to say yes, as one must assume that all changes have an impact on natural selection, and therefore impact on the evolution on life, whether caused by DNA or not. Take the fact that intelligent people tend to have less kids, not genetic, but still impacts on evolution through other factors. It's still technically natural selection, and therefore evolution, though, what I said could be a bunch of Bs, as like I said, I'm not a biologist. Thanks for the info btw!
Posted by TruthGen 2 years ago
TruthGen
Osiris: I see your point, here's some information you might find interesting:
http://en.wikipedia.org...

It says: In biology, and specifically genetics, epigenetics is mostly the study of heritable changes that are not caused by changes in the DNA sequence.

So the question is: Do these changes have a great impact on evolution?
Posted by Osiris_Rosenthorne 2 years ago
Osiris_Rosenthorne
Isn't this just evolution anyway, outside factors determining the genetic structures? Sorry if this sounds dumb, but I'm not a biologist.
Posted by TruthGen 2 years ago
TruthGen
Yes.
Posted by A341 2 years ago
A341
Epigenetics?
No votes have been placed for this debate.