The Instigator
HoKiaJunn
Pro (for)
Tied
0 Points
The Contender
Deav0n
Con (against)
Tied
0 Points

Does having a management degree give graduates a skills advantage in the graduate job market?

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Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 11/4/2015 Category: Education
Updated: 1 year ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 506 times Debate No: 82017
Debate Rounds (5)
Comments (2)
Votes (0)

 

HoKiaJunn

Pro

I would like to debate with a highly intelligent intellectual, only because I want a fiery debate, thanks!

I believe that having an management degree provides individuals with the required knowledge to enter the graduate job market, whereas individuals without would have a more difficult chance of entering.
Deav0n

Con

Because you stated "in the graduate job market" I am going to assume that you wish to argue that a management degree provides an individual with a greater advantage than someone with a differing agree. If this is the case then I can easily disagree.

Firstly we need to consider which roles the individual is applying for. A person with a Mathematics or Science degree applying for graduate jobs within the science sector are going to have an advantage over someone with a management degree (they most likely won't even be considered for the role).

Secondly a management degree is not area specific, if I wanted to enter a managerial role within a pharmaceutical company to first reach that position I would need to have an understanding of pharmaceuticals...something a management degree does not have (this same principle can be applied to a range of sectors)

You can't learn how to be a good manager by sitting in a lecture theatre and taking exams, experience is what creates a good manager.
Debate Round No. 1
HoKiaJunn

Pro

Welcome and thank you for joining me on this debate.

I understand the reasoning behind your answer, but I would much rather want to focus on comparing the competition in the job market with a graduate with a management degree and someone with no degrees at all, because if we stick by your first argument, there's nothing much more that can be said.

I also want to know your thoughts about the 'skills advantage' I mentioned in the question, do you think 'skills' is becoming rapidly re-defined by what employers want or is it much caused by the state of a country's economy. My position is Management degrees give the kids a fundementll skill and knowlege in a labur market, therefore they have an advantage over people who don't have any degrees. Please dispute this argument, if you can.

In addition, just for interest, how do you think human capital theory has a role on this, I'll dispute whatever your answer is.
Deav0n

Con

I also want to know your thoughts about the 'skills advantage' I mentioned in the question, do you think 'skills' is becoming rapidly re-defined by what employers want or is it much caused by the state of a country's economy.

I think there are a range of skills and if the skills you possess do not match the skills that the employer want then you simply won't get the job. The state of a countries economy will factor into the skill sets of the "average person" in each country. For example in America I'd consider reading, writing and computer skills to be the skills every "average person" possess yet a third world country would have a different "average skill set".

>My position is Management degrees give the kids a fundamental skill and knowledge in a labour market, therefore they have an advantage over people who don't have any degrees. Please dispute this argument, if you can.

I think this is very much job dependent, a labour heavy job which requires a small "skill set" then people without degrees, who have previous experience within a labour role, are much more likely to get the job. If you are looking for a more managerial role within this sector then yes someone with a degree would have a much higher skill set and have an advantage over someone who does not possess such a degree. I'd also like to argue that someone with EXPERIENCE and not a degree within a managerial role within that sector is much more likely to get the job that someone who is a fresh graduate with a management degree.

>In addition, just for interest, how do you think human capital theory has a role on this, I'll dispute whatever your answer is.

Human capital can be gained through several different means, just possessing a degree does not mean you automatically have a greater skill set. I value education greatly, after just finishing my undergraduate I plan to do my Masters next year. However I am of the opinion that it is completely dependent on what job role you are planning to enter.
Debate Round No. 2
HoKiaJunn

Pro

What do you think is the biggest disadvantage for person with a Management Degree looking for a job in the grad job market? Would you consider business school or management schools that teach students specialised skills in managing finance, accounts, organisations etc. would provide more advantage than a person with experience. Is there any actual evidence that a person with experience but with no management degree is more likely to be a favoured candidate in the recruitment process? If so, why is this, do employers tend to believe that students with a Management Degree is by fact worse of than a person with a degree? It is also interesting to know when did this idea come into place, and just how true is it?Because it does seems like a lot of people from one or two generations who had management degree were highly valuable.

"Human capital can be gained through several different means, just possessing a degree does not mean you automatically have a greater skill set. "

I don't understand what you mean by human capital can be gained through different ways, could you elaborate or provide some examples please, thanks.
Why doesn't possessing a management degree does not mean you automatically have greater management skill set, if this is true, what is the main aim of studying the management degree? Wouldn't the studying about management for a couple of years provide at least some greater management skill set then a person with experience.
Deav0n

Con

Deav0n forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 3
HoKiaJunn

Pro

HoKiaJunn forfeited this round.
Deav0n

Con

Deav0n forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 4
HoKiaJunn

Pro

HoKiaJunn forfeited this round.
Deav0n

Con

Deav0n forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 5
2 comments have been posted on this debate. Showing 1 through 2 records.
Posted by HoKiaJunn 1 year ago
HoKiaJunn
I changed it thanks.
Posted by Dr.1up 1 year ago
Dr.1up
Shouldn't you be Pro instead of Con?
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