The Instigator
DylanJacobus
Pro (for)
Tied
0 Points
The Contender
Buddamoose
Con (against)
Tied
0 Points

Don't stress over homework in high school

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Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 2/12/2012 Category: Education
Updated: 4 years ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 4,046 times Debate No: 21099
Debate Rounds (5)
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DylanJacobus

Pro

Spending a lot of time on homework in high school is a waste of time. When you spend all day and all night doing homework most days of the week, you're not doing anything but making the future hard for yourself. Instead of doing homework, you should be hanging out with your friends, making memories and having good times that you'll never have again. If you waste all of that time with your nose in your textbooks, you're going to hate yourself later on in life. Besides, you spend enough time learning the material during the school day anyway. If you don't know the material by the time you get home, then you're probably never really going to get much more out of it.

If you're doing homework to get better grades, that is also a waste of time because you can get into college with a less-than-perfect GPA, particularly state schools which will give you the same education as a private school. If you want a perfect GPA, then college is a time to start over. Don't waste what little time you have in high school.
Buddamoose

Con

I accept this debate and the terms defined therein. As the con position, I assert and will prove that homework is a necessary tool to fully understand and comprehend course materials in high school. I will also show that the best time to obtain knowledge is in the early years of ones life, and thus high school is just as, if not more important than college in terms of education. High school is the time in ones education career that you expand upon the basic knowledge learned in grade and junior high school. During this time a student must not only obtain the knowledge necessary for collegiate level classes, but must also develop the study habits necessary to succeed in college.

Thank you for starting this debate and I look forward to further clarification upon and evidence to back your assertions.
Debate Round No. 1
DylanJacobus

Pro

Picking-and-choosing which homework assignments to do is a great idea. As long as you do enough to not completely fail your class, you can go far with a passing grade. Many state schools, such as Montclair University and William Paterson University in New Jersey will accept students with a GPA as low as, well, nothing! There is no minimum requirement. Although the "recommended" incoming GPA is a 3.0, anyone who goes to either of those schools knows that much of the student body came in with a GPA far below 3.0. Anyone who goes to either of those schools also knows how good of an education the schools provide. WPU and Montclair both rank as being in the top regional northern universities. That being said, you really don't have to stress out about doing all of your homework. All you need to do is do enough to not fail and you'll be able to get into college. Spend time with your friends instead. Have fun.

References for admission requirements:
http://ask.wpunj.edu...?
http://www.montclair.edu...
Buddamoose

Con

Excerpt from admissions requirements from montclair.edu -

"We review each application individually; however, when considering an applicant for Freshman Admission, certain minimum standards are followed. Strong candidates for admission generally meet the following criteria:
A GPA of 3.0 or greater in the required curriculum
A combined SAT score of 1425 (Math, Critical Reading, and Writing) or ACT composite score of 20"

What in that would suggest there is no minimum GPA?

Excerpt from William Paterson University website-
"There is no minimum grade point average, SAT score, or rank in class�required for Admission. All academic components are considered as a whole when an Admissions decision is made.

The average matriculated student (2004-2005) holds a 3.00 GPA, a rank in class of 67% (top 1/3) and a 1050 CSAT score (Math and Critical Reading scores only; William Paterson University does not consider the writing..."

I sincerely hope my peer continued reading and saw the whole part about an average matriculated student? That's kind of a hint, because both of these universities are one that can accept or reject admissions as they please, and if you don't have what an average matriculated student has or more, it would be a safe guess that your chances of acceptance are highly diminished. For private and even public four year universities it really is about performing well in high school. I also would ask for perhaps any evidence my peer has available for his claims that "most people" have entered into this university with GPA below 3.0.

Furthermore, my peers assertion that "if you don't know the material by the time you
get home, then you're probably never going to get much more out of it." is, well, its false.

"The clearest point is the striking influence of age. There seems, from these studies, to be a clear and significant benefit to doing homework for high school students. Students 11 to 13 years of age also showed a clear benefit, but it was much smaller. Students below this age showed no benefit."(1)

There are other positives to homework as well, it instills study habits that help a student to succeed in college because, when you are pursuing a collegiate level education, the responsibility to complete all given assignments rests on the students shoulders alone, and if they aren't prepared both in terms of knowledge, and study-habits, they are setting themselves up for sub-par performance.

Also, not doing homework has been shown to lead to increased drop out rates in high school.

"Interestingly, our sample indicated that 26 percent did no homework, and, including them, 80 percent of those surveyed did one hour or less of homework each day. Part of this may have been the result of a lack of student motivation and some of it may have been attributable to low expectations their teachers or schools had for them. In our focus groups, participants shared stories that would indicate both. There have been studies showing that students who do little or no homework each week increase their risk of dropping out"(2)

Homework also teaches a valuable life lesson, that work does not stop when you get home.

"All adults have "errands" to do some people choose to call them responsibilities other people choose to call it "business", no matter what you choose to call it you are doing a form of home work. Take your child with you or sit them down and shown them exactly what your "homework" is, the child will see that the reading homework they have is very important so they can read the bills later in life, they will see that the math homework they hate so much will be important so they can make sure their paycheck is correct when they start working.

When I sat my children down and explained to them what would happen if I didn't do my "daily homework" they didn't understand at first, so�I sat down in front of the television and played on the computer ignoring all my responsibilities for that night. An hour after our usual dinner time my children came to me and asked why we didn't have dinner and told me that they were very hungry, I looked at them and explained to them I didn't go to the store and get anything for dinner. I explained to them that my homework for that day was to get food from the store so we could eat it that night, but I didn't want to do my homework because I wanted to play instead. They understood very quickly why homework was important."(3)

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1) http://www.memory-key.com...

2) John M. Bridgeland / John J. DiIulio, Jr. / Karen Burke Morison "The Silent Epidemic: Perspectives of High School Dropouts" Mar. 2006

3) Randy Scarborough "Explaining why homework is important to children" 28 Jan. 2011
http://m.examiner.com...
Debate Round No. 2
DylanJacobus

Pro

If you get rejected from either of those schools, college probably isn't the place for you. Anyway, if you're smart enough to not have to do all your homework, then don't. My argument is to not stress over homework in high school, not to never do homework at all. Doing homework before high school is indeed a good idea, as my Con friend pointed out. It does help to enforce what is learned in school. By the time high school comes around though, you've had 8 years of practice with homework. If you've figured out how to basically get it done, then you shouldn't be spending your whole day on it.

Studies have been done showing the clear benefit of doing homework for younger kids. Interestingly enough, studies show that the same principle does not necessarily apply to students who are in high school. The myth that the more time spent doing homework will improve a students performance is false. In fact, the ideal amount of time is only about 1 to 2 hours a day. The British school system even recommends only half an hour a day for higher level students. Doing more than 3 hours of homework will actually be detrimental to a person, cutting into valuable extra-curricular activities. The College Board stresses the importance of extra-curricular activities; we can't deny that! If too much time is spent doing homework, there will be no time for anything like sports, taking a jobs, or just general hang-out time with friends, which is valuable in its own right, teaching kids to be cooperative and inventive when making plans. If you aren't getting enough of this activity, you need to knock it off with the homework. Again, my point is that you just need to do enough. You don't need to get 100's on your homework if it's getting you 0's in the outside world.


http://www.memory-key.com...

http://www.collegeboard.com...

http://teenlibrarianstoolbox.blogspot.com...
Buddamoose

Con

Buddamoose forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 3
DylanJacobus

Pro

When you are in high school, you are forced to take classes that you not only don't have an interest in taking, but don't even like. The class may have no benefit to you at all, especially if you know what you want to go to college for and the class has nothing to do with your plan. When you are in college, you get to pick which classes suit you. The homework that you will be doing for those classes may be enjoyable, but it may also be tedious. However, even if it is tedious, you need to do it because your degree depends on the successful completion of the course. Besides, not doing the best you can do in college is a waste of your money (or your parents' money). You don't pay thousands of dollars to go to high school and you don't like the classes. Don't kill yourself trying to finish every assignment.

The expectations of a high school student and a college student are expressly different. If you don't do your homework in high school, people will not judge you as harshly as they would if you didn't do your homework in college. By the time you get to college, you are expected to be mature and more in tune with being willing to get high marks. Not doing your homework in college shows a lack of care for even being there, which like I was saying before, is a waste of money. In high school, it is more acceptable for someone to not do homework. Even if you are "mature enough" to be focused on getting high grades (is that really mature anyway?), you can still get away with not doing homework in favor of having time for more fun activities. No one will think badly of you! So go ahead and do it. You'll save yourself from going nuts spending hours on homework you don't even care about, and you'll be able to make a "miraculous 180" in college. People might be more impressed with you if you do that anyway.

The following link has testimonials similar to my reasons:
http://talk.collegeconfidential.com...
Buddamoose

Con

Buddamoose forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 4
DylanJacobus

Pro

I'm assuming my opponent has given up.
Buddamoose

Con

Buddamoose forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 5
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