The Instigator
Logical-Master
Pro (for)
Winning
17 Points
The Contender
TheSkeptic
Con (against)
Losing
16 Points

During or after this debate concludes, my opponent ought to read the "Liar Game" manga

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Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 8/31/2009 Category: Entertainment
Updated: 7 years ago Status: Voting Period
Viewed: 2,227 times Debate No: 9385
Debate Rounds (4)
Comments (16)
Votes (6)

 

Logical-Master

Pro

I believe that my opponent ought to read all available chapters of the following manga during or after this debate concludes: http://www.onemanga.com...

Like other debate of mine, this round shall serve to be the greeting round. My opponent can present his case upon accepting this debate or wait for me to present mine; such is inconsequential. In addition, I reserve the right to challenge any definition or interpretation of the topic should I feel it does not meet the intentions of this debate. It is advised that if my opponent has any questions that he post them in the comment section so that I may address them without wasting space during the debate rounds.
TheSkeptic

Con

I thank my opponent for challenging me to this debate. Having never debated this kind of topic, and knowing that L-M is highly gifted in debating, I'm positive this will turn out to be fun.

I should note that a decisive determinant of the outcome of this debate hinges on my personal preferences. I will guarantee that I will keep true to my actual preferences, and not make it intentionally difficult for my opponent by faking (like saying I hate reading). The warrant and value of this guarantee is up to you, all I can do is give my word.

I won't give any argument in this round, but have it serve as a greeting round as well.
Debate Round No. 1
Logical-Master

Pro

Onto my case . . .
===========================================================================
OUTLINE: |
===========

Congratulations! You are one of the 1 in 100,000 people who have been entered in the amazing LIAR GAME TOURNAMENT! Along with the postcard there are 100 million yen in notes. That's the beginning of the Liar Game. When the game ends, in 30 days, you will have to return your 100 million. If your opponent steals them, he can keep them as a prize, and you will have a debt of 100 million...

Nao Kanzaki, an honest college student, receives 100 million yen (about $1,000,000) one day, along with a card saying that she has been chosen to participate in the "Liar Game Tournament". In order to win the game, she is to steal the 100 million yen issued to her sole opponent, and to keep hers safe. Upon finding out to her opponent is her former teacher Kazuo Fujisawa, she misplaces her trust in him and is easily deceived. Knowing that losing the game will put her in debt, a lawyer tells her of Shinichi Akiyama, a genius swindler.

Akiyama had just finished a prison term for driving a multi-level marketing corporation into bankruptcy, and at first refuses to help Nao. After seeing her trusting nature, he decides to help on the condition that he receives half her profits. Though she is left in the dark about his plans, in the end he steals not only Nao's 100 million yen back but Fujisawa's as well. After returning the 100 million yen she was first issued by the LGT, Nao has an extra 100 million, while her teacher is in debt. Though she gives 50 million to Akiyama as promised, she gives her own share to Fujisawa so that he can reduce his debt. Seeing this, Akiyama also returns his share. He claims that as he promised to get only half of what Nao earns; if she receives nothing, he receives nothing too.
===========================================================================

Above, I have briefly outlined the events of the first round of the Liar Game tournament, but (for obvious reasons) have left out a vast amount of its depth and shall try not to spoil anything concerning the later rounds. The series revolves around Akiyama helping Nao get through this tournament. Throughout each chapter, you'll find yourself gasping in awe at how ingenious the "games" in the tournament have been set up or how clever Akiyama is in realistically overcoming situations which you really see no way out of. Even in the first round, I myself was honestly of the belief that there was no way for the main character to win the first round even up to the very end (in spite of previously having been told that the protagonists are successful), only to be absolutely flabbergasted at how Akiyama managed to believable swindle the money required.

As the story continues, the games get more complex, you learn more about both Nao and Akiyama motivations and the series even goes in depth through both a psychological and philosophical perspective. Whether it be why humans lie or what it is to truly "trust" someone, it is certainly rather enlightening and certainly breath of fresh air when in comparison to a lot of the garbage that sadly pollutes this medium of entertainment.

What I'm basically getting at is that this series caters to intellectuals (if it doesn't, CON is free to prove me wrong . . . which he can do through digging up information in my source or objecting to any claim which I've made about the series . . . which he'd probably need to source to do anyway. :D ). Seeing as how CON is an intellectual (on the basis that he likes to debate and is intrigued by both complexity and philosophy---which one can reasonably conclude through reading his prior debates and comments on debates in particular, this series would more likely than not prove to be intriguing reading material for him.

And that'll do it for now (though I reserve the right to present new arguments should I feel inclined to do so). :D

===============
CROSS-EXAMINATION|
===============

Question #1: What's the best way for you to counter my position while still being completely honest about your interests?

Question #2: How familiar are you with the entertainment from this culture?

Question #3: Is money the most important thing in the world?

Question #4: Are you the kind of person who easily trust others or are you always skeptical of any particular individual's actions?

Quesion #5: In explicit detail, what is the best method of me successfully upholding my position and winning this debate?
TheSkeptic

Con

Seeing as how we have 4 rounds, this round will simply serve as an anchor for further arguments in further rounds. This means that all I will do is answer the 5 cross-examination questions in a detailed and precise way. I will then include some questions in the end regarding several of my opponent's claims concerning the nature of Liar Game. All of this is to further my opponent's understanding of my personal preferences so we can have a more even debate.

====================
CROSS-EXAMINATION
====================

Question #1: What's the best way for you to counter my position while still being completely honest about your interests?

The best way I can think of right now is to give you a list/idea/feel of what I like via examples. For example, my favorite book/tv series/movie/manga/etc. would obviously relate if you are planning to convince me to read something meant to entertain me at the very least. Of course, this just pushes back the problem a step back because I could easily lie about what I watch (for example, if I were to say that I only like hardcore pornography videos, then you're going to have a hard time convincing me to read Liar Game). This means when I counter your position, I will simply show you what I normally prefer, and show how it is misaligned with Liar Game. As I said before, the only thing I can do is give you my guarantee.

Question #2: How familiar are you with the entertainment from this culture?

Pretty familiar. I do read manga as one of my hobbies, but it's certainly not a big part nor a focus in my life. It's one of those things that are just part of my daily routine - I don't give much thought about a manga after reading it, like starting a forum topic discussion or visiting fan sites. This mainly applies to manga I actually like reading - many other times I am coerced by friends to read a manga so we can discuss it; sometimes I'll do it, but this rarely happens.

Question #3: Is money the most important thing in the world?

As the popular cliche goes: it depends. I assume this questions would mean, in more explicit detail, if having money (usually meaning having a lot of) is the most important thing in the world to a person. Since I am more or less an existentialist, I would argue that money can be the most important thing in the world to someone, but it's not necessary everyone else. In fact, I would argue most people don't value money as the end of all ends because it's usually the means to something. Most people money because of it's color or texture, but rather of what it can get you. Whatever you want to obtain with money would then probably be more important. So my answer is while it can be, and sometimes is, it's usually not.

Question #4: Are you the kind of person who easily trust others or are you always skeptical of any particular individual's actions?

This once again depends. If I have prior knowledge of someone's behavior, then I'll either be more trusting of them or skeptical. For example, if someone is known for lying, I'll be more skeptical of them. However, if I meet a stranger then by default I am somewhat in between. I'm not hasty to be trusting them, but neither will I be overtly skeptical of their intentions. I'd trust them to pay me back 50 cents if they borrow it (if they don't, I frankly don't care) but I'm skeptical about telling them a dark secret and such.

Question #5: In explicit detail, what is the best method of me successfully upholding my position and winning this debate?

All you need to do is show that stemming from what I read/watch, Liar Game fits my preferences. If you can convince me that I will enjoy it thoroughly, then you will have upheld your position. I'll say in advance that I won't be using any arguments saying that I have no time or such - it will hinge entirely on whether or not I like it.

====================
Questions concerning elements of "Liar Game
====================

You make several references to the content of Liar Game - a clarification of them will help decide whether or not I would like to read this manga.

1. What psychological and philosophical topics does it touch upon?

2. Does it make any convincing or interesting/genuine case for any idea presented (presumably via some character)?

3. How does it appeal to me as an intellectual? If something were to appeal to me intellectually, I'd say the only way is through philosophy. So in other words, how is Liar Game philosophically intriguing for me?
Debate Round No. 2
Logical-Master

Pro

Crap. 5 minutes. Better make this quick.

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RE: C/X |
=======

1) Alright then. What do you normally prefer? What is your favorite book/books/tv series/manga/et?

2) So then it's established you do not have a problem reading manga? Very good.

3) Thanks for responding. I think I'll save this answer

4) Liar Game disagrees with my opponent and adheres to the philosophy that everyone should be doubted. Through reading Liar Game (more importantly, reading the entire series when it is finished), my opponent own philosophy shall be expanded upon (enlightenment of this idea and the possibility that his own ideas may even evolve by one step).

5) I shall gladly do this upon my opponent providing information on what he reads/watches, though disagree that this is the only means for me to win this debate. Nevertheless, if you buy my argument (that Liar Game fits his preferences), it's an automatic win on my part regardless of what else is discussed here.

==============================
Questions concerning elements of "Liar Game |
==============================

1. lol. There are so many, it's hard to list each and every one.

Psychology: Cognitive Dissonance, Class, Prisoner Dilemna, human interaction mostly being scripted,
Philosophy: Doubt, Ethics of Deception. Not enough time. Should've made this debate 5 rounds. :(

2. Example Idea: People should be doubted:

Akiyama's defense of this assertion:

http://www.onemanga.com...
http://www.onemanga.com...
http://www.onemanga.com...
http://www.onemanga.com...
http://www.onemanga.com...

3. I'd disagree that the only way to appeal to one intellectually is philosophically; even in terms of my opponent. The games played throughout the series often involve a great deal of complexity (often centered around using mathematics to win). Merely reading these battles of wits is both entertaining and excellent in terms of mental exercise.

In terms of philosophy, we'll go with the above one I provided for now (especially since it's a recurring theme) since I'm out of time. If necessary, I'll mention more examples in the next round.

Peace.
TheSkeptic

Con

I thank my opponent for this interesting debate. Since this is the nearing the last round, I'll try to explain in even more detail my preferences, and how I see them to not align with the elements of Liar Game - of course, mainly by answering the questions asked.

===================
Cross Examination
===================

1). My favorite book(s) are mainly books on philosophy - I am no fan of reading fiction or fantasy novels; they bore me to hell.

I don't watch enough TV to follow a certain series (unless you count UFC as a series), but I do like the shows made by Joss Whedon (Firefly, Buffy the Vampire Slayer, etc.). Mainly, though, the things I watch on TV are usually UFC or most of the shows on Comedy Central (and of course, Family Guy, Simpsons, South Park, etc.)

For manga, and I'd guess this would be most important, I don't read too much but I do like Samurai Deeper Kyo and Berserk (to name a few), for the sole reason that the protagonist is somewhat of an anti-hero. An anti-hero in the sense that they don't have common inhibitions about killing that many other protagonists from different stories have (there's an idiotic but recurring theme among manga about the sanctity of life and about love, or some crap). I like how even though these protagonists do have some "good side" to them, after all they can't pass off as entirely evil people and end the manga like that, they still like to do a lot of killing.

2). I guess this question doesn't need to be discussed any further.

3). Same here, since my opponent has decided to save his answer.

4). To be honest, I kind of expected this. Most manga have highly idealized beliefs, in this case believing everyone should be doubted. However, if we were to have a serious debate on this then I would clearly believe this belief to be ludicrous - not EVERYONE is a liar, and trust can form in many different ways (many theories of sociology deal with this). Unless my opponent can give me an interesting case from Liar Game as to why I should believe in this, then not only would I find Liar Game given off as just another manga with high ideals, but I'll disagree with it as well - which makes it less pleasurable to read. And since you do this in the following section, I'll answer to that there.

5). Sure, if you show that Liar Game fits my preferences then you win. If you have another way you think you can win, then go ahead and attempt to employ that as well.

====================
Questions concerning elements of "Liar Game"
====================

1. In summary, though, they are all boring or unoriginal. I really don't have a care for different concepts or beliefs in psychology, since as an "intellectual" I appeal mainly to philosophy. In philosophy, however, all I see is doubt and ethics of deception. I don't know what you mean by doubt, unless you are referring to epistemology and to the question of how much do we really know. If this is the case, then this is definitely interesting but will still be regurgitated knowledge - unless Liar Game can give new insights into this philosophical issue (which would be amazing for a manga), then I won't appeal to me intellectually. Same with "ethics of deception", which I can only take to be as whether or not lying is moral - this would play into ethical theories which are commonly discussed, meaning once again this is regurgitated material. To appeal to me intellectually, I need to constantly read the forefront of intellectual thought, which mainly philosophy books and articles can do for me.

2. Let's see if Akiyama's defense of his assertion is original, least of all convincing:

To summarize, he believes that doubting people is a way to get to know them better. And while I agree this can happen many times, this is a non sequitor from the claim that we should doubt everyone. You see, when I trust someone this is because I have judged their personality to a certain degree, and interpersonally ascribed them some bond of trust - the trust is stronger when I know their personality better (and of course, if their personality allows for trust as well). Trusting or doubting someone isn't mainly the method that you use to get to know people, it is the RESULT of getting to know people.

3. The problem is, if you want to appeal to ME intellectually then it can only be done with philosophy, since this is the only academic discipline of real great interest to me. I understand that mathematics or game theory can appeal to someone but for my preferences this isn't true.
Debate Round No. 3
Logical-Master

Pro

1) In my opponent's response, I cannot help but notice how precisely he responded in terms of his interest in manga. Specifically, he prefers the protagonist to be somewhat of an anti-hero (good to some extent, but totally willing be down with acts perceived as evil). Ladies and gentleman, the leading male protagonist of Liar Game would in fact be considered an anti-hero. Akiyama is a infamous Con artist who has bankrupted a high level corporation in the past and has no problems with sending people home with millions of dollars of debt hence ruining their lives (as a result of defeating them in the Liar Game tournament)(which he has stated himself). On the other hand, with the leading female's influence, has shown himself willing to save the games losers by sacrificing his winnings.

Furthermore, whereas I have not read samurai Deeper Kyo, I've read every single chapter of Berserk to date. My opponent's preference of this manga shall be his downfall in this debate.

2) Indeed, this question need not be discussed any further.

3) I've decided to drop this one on the basis that I don't need it.

4) My opponent accuses Akiyama's philosophy of being ludicrous, however shows a grave misunderstanding of it by concluding that it can be somehow interpreted as suggesting that everyone is a liar. This by no means is the point of Akiyama's speech. Rather, the point is to use doubt as means of understanding other individuals. In other words, Akiyama is insisting the female lead (and perhaps the reader) to BE Skeptical (which, as evidenced by chapter 83, allowed her to better understand another one of the protagonists in the story, but I won't get into that) of other people. Which, ironically enough, is my opponent's user name . . . ergo, when really thinking about it, I really don't have to provide this interesting case which CON speaks of seeing as how my he already adheres to the ideal without even knowing it, hence making it an even more pleasurable read as his ideal is being agreed with, explored upon and even placed into the form of entertainment.

To quote Akiyama's own words:

"Question them, suspect them . . . and take a good long look into their hearts."

If an idea like this doesn't befit someone who calls himself TheSkeptic, I don't know what does. :D

5) So far, I've shown that the series syncs with my opponent's ideals. Noting that he likes Berserk for the reasons he stated, I've even shown how he clearly matches his preferences momentarily. However, I'd once again like to express the notion that this isn't the only means of me winning this debate. As long as you agree that my opponent reading this manga is good for him, I've done my job.

===============================
Questions concerning elements of "Liar Game" |
===============================

1. I believe this issue of "regurgitated knowledge" is the heart of the matter with my opponent as this line about "To appeal to me intellectually, I need to constantly read the forefront of intellectual thought, which mainly philosophy books and articles can do for me" stands out to me. The purpose of this manga is not the same as a peer reviewed article or even a philosophy book. Rather, the purpose is mostly to entertain the readers. When I pointed out that this manga would appeal to my opponent as an intellectual, the point I was making was that intellectual information was being put into the form of entertainment. There is indeed a great deal which my opponent can be enlightened by, but it's not the only means of appealing to him.

2. Lets take this one section at a time:

"To summarize, he believes that doubting people is a way to get to know them better."

Correct. :)

RE:"And while I agree this can happen many times, this is a non sequitor from the claim that we should doubt everyone."

False, unless my opponent is insisting that what he says below is non sequitor.

RE:"You see, when I trust someone this is because I have judged their personality to a certain degree, and interpersonally ascribed them some bond of trust - the trust is stronger when I know their personality better (and of course, if their personality allows for trust as well)."

Note the words judge and know how he is insisting that this thing called trust develops as he gets to learn more about the individual in questions personality. Finally, read the following page: http://www.onemanga.com...

From the information provided by my opponent's own mouth as well as the information provided from the series in question, we know 3 things:

1) My opponent uses doubt to instigate a relationship. Judging and gathering information is precisely what Akiyama speaks of as being what one ought to do; it is to doubt. My opponent truly is TheSkeptic

2) If you'll read the page in question, you'll note that there is never anything stated against the act of trusting others. What Akiyama states is that merely people often confuse trust with apathy. He believes the act of trust to be noble and has nothing against it.

Put both of these facts together, reread my opponents response to Akiyama's philosophy and we notice that he by no means disagrees with it. On the contrary, he has merely misread the pages I provided and is actually AFFIRMING it

RE:"Trusting or doubting someone isn't mainly the method that you use to get to know people, it is the RESULT of getting to know people."

False. You don't start questioning or examining an individuals intentions AFTER you know them. You do so beforehand. Even my opponent agrees with this. Trust can possibly be a result of getting to know people, but doubt certainly isn't limited to such. It can exist before and afterwords.

3. No, I agree. I do in fact want to appeal to my opponent intellectually, but this notion that this can only be done by arguing from standpoint which he claims to be interested in erroneous at best. For instance, whereas a child in elementary school may not show strong interest in mathematics or science, studying in both fields shall benefit him/her intellectually as he/she shall not only be more knowledgeable about the world, but possess the information needed to excel in education. Liar Game's dealings with mathematics, psychology and philosophy (which my opponent seems to disagree on) is where it excels intellectually. Liar's game strength is that it makes all of this "boring" stuff entertaining. Whether or not my opponent may have seen any of the intellecual information before is irrelevant. Through reading the series (assuming he has explored all of the involved concepts), he shall have a good time refreshing himself while being entertained by the plot and characters.

4. To top it all off, my opponent is by no means as concerned with philosophy being provided in his entertainment as he'd like you to believe. Having read every single chapter of Berserk, I know this without a doubt. Berserk's strong points are not philosophical (heck, at best, the subject only seriously exist in casual comments made in reference to causality from time to time). To top it off, he states he reads this manga for the sole reason that the protagonist is an anti hero (again, not something noticeably philosophical, although if it is, my case for Akiyama wins me the debate still).

Thus, for great justice, I insist that you vote PRO
TheSkeptic

Con

I thank my opponent for this interesting debate. Yet, I can say without a doubt that currently Liar Game has failed to interest me in the least. This is because my opponent has failed to remember his original spearhead point: Liar Game was supposed to appeal to me as an intellectual. Having explained that only philosophy that is on the forefront of intellectual thought or new to me is appealing, Liar Game isn't even close to intellectually appealing for me. My opponent makes a good effort in his case to convince me to read Liar Game, but he makes a few important errors:

====================
Cross Examination
====================

1). Ah, but you see, I specifically stated in my response that I only like anti-hero's of the sort that KILL :). If you've read every single chapter of Berserk to date, then you would know that Guts (the protagonist) does a whole lot of killing - not being a con artist. Kyo, the protagonist of Samurai Deeper Kyo, actually has a carnal pleasure when he kills, even though he is a "good guy". It is these types of characters who appeal to me; their twisted methods of killing their enemies and striking fear into those who have yet to die is great to watch. However, do notice that this does NOT intellectually appeal to me, as it has nothing to do with philosophy. And since my opponent specifically stated that Liar Game would be intellectually pleasing to me, then this point becomes useless for him.

2). No further discussion needed.

3). Dropped by my opponent since it's not needed.

4). Let's for the sake of argument assume my opponent is correct in representing Akiyama's philosophy. Even then, this claim boils down to being absolutely trivial in respect to common sense. Of course we should doubt everyone to a certain degree, forming relationships is much like forming beliefs. When people believe something, it's mostly because they believe it's likely to be true - even though there's a slim chance it's not. Likewise, even though everyone has different degrees of trust in different types of relationships, there's is or SHOULD be some form of doubt - simply because no one's personality is ABSOLUTELY rigid and predictable. There is always the chance someone will go crazy, or has been putting up a facade the entire time, no matter how improbable. This kind of trivial truth is of no intellectual appeal to me; it's stating the obvious.

5). This series, though woven with some intellectual ideas, has no philosophical ideas that are original or intriguing, and thus no intellectual appeal. Remember, to intellectually appeal to me it must either be original or foreign (in the sense that I have yet to know about it) philosophy, or a new argument/case for some philosophical school (new arguments for God, new arguments for functionalism, etc.). For example, I am currently reading a lot of metaphysics, and to be exact the debate between actualism and possibilism. I have until recently never known about these ideas, and it's absolutely intriguing. On the other hand, the thesis that there should be a certain degree of doubt in every relationship is painstakingly common sense, and boring.

=====================
Questions concerning elements of "Liar Game"
=====================

1). My opponent her has dug his own hole. He admits that "the purpose of this manga is not the same as a peer reviewed article or even a philosophy book. Rather, the purpose is mostly to entertain the readers." I ABSOLUTELY AGREE. This is why Liar Game will not intellectually appeal to me! Your entire case crumbles on this concession. You see, I agree with you that Liar Game can serve as a different means of intellectual appeal. Unfortunately for you, my personal preferences when it comes to intellectual appeal is sealed mainly in philosophy, which Liar Game fails to satisfy.

2). Sure, let's assume your reading of Akiyama's philosophy is correct. In fact, since you are much more knowledgeable about his character, I'd say you are right. However, this serves nothing than to affirm the triviality of his claim. Furthermore, this is practically out of the bounds of philosophy but rather sociology - Akiyama is telling us how to interact with people, in what one can say is the wisest way (to doubt them).

3). My opponent mistakes something being intellectually BENEFICIAL and something being intellectually APPEALING. Since my opponent is arguing for the latter, learning things that I am not interested in (I've declared my major, I know what I like intellectually) is not a way of appealing to me.

"...he shall have a good time refreshing himself while being entertained by the plot and characters."

----> This is irrelevant to the point of being intellectually appealing. Now, if you'd argued that Liar Game would appeal to me via it's plot and characters, then maybe we'd have a different conclusion in this debate.

4). Berserk is definitely not philosophically appealing, and I definitely don't read it for intellectual appeal. I do it mainly because I like watching violence, something most people can echo along. This is no problem for me because in this debate, you specifically stated that you are trying to convince me to read Liar Game for intellectual reasons, not because it's violent or what not.

=====================
Conclusion
=====================

This is the main reason why I shouldn't read Liar Game: it's not intellectually pleasing, and since my opponent has yet to find another element of it that would possibly appeal to me, I shouldn't read it.
Debate Round No. 4
16 comments have been posted on this debate. Showing 1 through 10 records.
Posted by ToastOfDestiny 7 years ago
ToastOfDestiny
I can be proud to say that I picked up Liar Game really early =). The updates really piss me off. I wish I could read fluent Japanese. Then I'd move to Japan and be a happy man.
Posted by Common_Sense_Please 7 years ago
Common_Sense_Please
Liar game is awesome :) I just picked a manga at random and it happened to be the one. It is a shame about the updates... I'v been waiting forever for the next one...
Posted by Rezzealaux 7 years ago
Rezzealaux
Watch da video :D
Posted by Logical-Master 7 years ago
Logical-Master
What is Clannad about?
Posted by Rezzealaux 7 years ago
Rezzealaux
I started looking into Liar Game after seeing the related section on MyAnimeList for Kaiji and Akagi. I found Kanzaki a pretty respectable character after a while, and she really changed me a bit, so I like Liar Game, even if it is starting to seem a little repetitive to me :) The challenges are definitely still creative, but it's not having the same drive or intensity as an anime could do for it. Still, I follow it. Though I haven't been doing so for a while, ever since I found CLANNAD, but I haven't finished CLANNAD either because of F*CKING SCHOOL >(

I don't read that much manga. I'm more an anime guy.
Senjougahara Fascination!!!!
Posted by Logical-Master 7 years ago
Logical-Master
I'm surprised someone on this site other than me has actually read Liar Game. Pity about the slow @ss updates. :( Even worse than the FMA manga updates, but I suppose it's at least better than having to wait 3 or 5 months for a single chapter of Berserk.
Posted by Rezzealaux 7 years ago
Rezzealaux
I LOVE MIRIA~~~~

Bokurano is a f*cking masterpiece. Okay maybe not a masterpiece, maybe it won't fulfill your metaphysical desires and all that, but it's really really good. I think, anyways. If I had to pick between Liar Game and Bokurano, I'd pick Bokurano.
Posted by TheSkeptic 7 years ago
TheSkeptic
Ah, I read Claymore. Chicks with swords - nice. I don't know anything about the other one, but whatever. *Bookmark*
Posted by Rezzealaux 7 years ago
Rezzealaux
Put Bokurano on that list too. And Claymore.
Posted by TheSkeptic 7 years ago
TheSkeptic
To be honest, I've bookmarked it in my "Manga to Read" folder - but simply because it's popular and I figured I'd give it a try :P
6 votes have been placed for this debate. Showing 1 through 6 records.
Vote Placed by Yraelz 7 years ago
Yraelz
Logical-MasterTheSkepticTied
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Vote Placed by Logical-Master 7 years ago
Logical-Master
Logical-MasterTheSkepticTied
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Vote Placed by Kleptin 7 years ago
Kleptin
Logical-MasterTheSkepticTied
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Vote Placed by Danielle 7 years ago
Danielle
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Vote Placed by DictatorIsaac 7 years ago
DictatorIsaac
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Vote Placed by TheSkeptic 7 years ago
TheSkeptic
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