The Instigator
gavstrk
Con (against)
Tied
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The Contender
emospongebob527
Pro (for)
Tied
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End of the world

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Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 10/1/2012 Category: Science
Updated: 5 years ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 1,348 times Debate No: 25934
Debate Rounds (4)
Comments (1)
Votes (0)

 

gavstrk

Con

I myslef very much disagree with the statement of the end of the world is December 21, 2012. I have gone into extensive research looking at this topic and have decided it is all false. My first main argument is that the Mayan calender is just a calender. Nothing more, nothing less, it is a calender, which means when december 21 ends december 22 starts a new calender year, just like ours. Secondly, they say Planet X or Nibiru is going to crash into Earth, This is completely false again. If there was aplanet x we would be tracking it by now. Lastly, they say there will be catastrophic event happening on this date. This is again completely false. They say evry so many years that the Earth increases it's natural disaster activity, but if this is true, how come the Earth has not been destroyed yet. Remeber Y2K, ayh how did that work out, we are still here, therefore the end of Earth is a hoax!
emospongebob527

Pro

Although I don't believe the world will end in 2012, I am a strong believer in The Big Bang Occuring Again, Nuclear War, The Explosion of The Sun, Solar Flares...................

So let's just say I believe in apocalyptic occurrences, just not necessarily in 2012........

So I'm really just arguing for the sake of arguing......

I accept!
Debate Round No. 1
gavstrk

Con

gavstrk forfeited this round.
emospongebob527

Pro

It appears my opponent is absent and a forced forfeit was followed through by the system.................
I will present my argument anyway.........

Ways the World Could End-

Asteroid impact -
Once a disaster scenario gets the cheesy Hollywood treatment, it's hard to take it seriously. But there is no question that a cosmic interloper will hit Earth, and we won't have to wait millions of years for it to happen. In 1908 a 200-foot-wide comet fragment slammed into the atmosphere and exploded over the Tunguska region in Siberia, Russia, with nearly 1,000 times the energy of the atomic bomb dropped on Hiroshima. Astronomers estimate similar-sized events occur every one to three centuries. Benny Peiser, an anthropologist-cum-pessimist at Liverpool John Moores University in England, claims that impacts have repeatedly disrupted human civilization. As an example, he says one killed 10,000 people in the Chinese city of Chi'ing-yang in 1490. Many scientists question his interpretations: Impacts are most likely to occur over the ocean, and small ones that happen over land are most likely to affect unpopulated areas. But with big asteroids, it doesn't matter much where they land. Objects more than a half-mile wide"which strike Earth every 250,000 years or so"would touch off firestorms followed by global cooling from dust kicked up by the impact. Humans would likely survive, but civilization might not. An asteroid five miles wide would cause major extinctions, like the one that may have marked the end of the age of dinosaurs. For a real chill, look to the Kuiper belt, a zone just beyond Neptune that contains roughly 100,000 ice-balls more than 50 miles in diameter. The Kuiper belt sends a steady rain of small comets earthward. If one of the big ones headed right for us, that would be it for pretty much all higher forms of life, even cockroaches.

Gamma-ray burst-
If you could watch the sky with gamma-ray vision, you might think you were being stalked by cosmic paparazzi. Once a day or so, you would see a bright flash appear, briefly outshine everything else, then vanish. These gamma-ray bursts, astrophysicists recently learned, originate in distant galaxies and are unfathomably powerful"as much as 10 quadrillion (a one followed by 16 zeros) times as energetic as the sun. The bursts probably result from the merging of two collapsed stars. Before the cataclysmal event, such a double star might be almost completely undetectable, so we'd likely have no advance notice if one is lurking nearby. Once the burst begins, however, there would be no missing its fury. At a distance of 1,000 light-years"farther than most of the stars you can see on a clear night"it would appear about as bright as the sun. Earth's atmosphere would initially protect us from most of the burst's deadly X rays and gamma rays, but at a cost. The potent radiation would cook the atmosphere, creating nitrogen oxides that would destroy the ozone layer. Without the ozone layer, ultraviolet rays from the sun would reach the surface at nearly full force, causing skin cancer and, more seriously, killing off the tiny photosynthetic plankton in the ocean that provide oxygen to the atmosphere and bolster the bottom of the food chain. All the gamma-ray bursts observed so far have been extremely distant, which implies the events are rare. Scientists understand so little about these explosions, however, that it's difficult to estimate the likelihood of one detonating in our galactic neighborhood.

Collapse of the vacuum-
In the book Cat's Cradle, Kurt Vonnegut popularized the idea of "ice-nine," a form of water that is far more stable than the ordinary kind, so it is solid at room temperature. Unleash a bit of it, and suddenly all water on Earth transforms to ice-nine and freezes solid. Ice-nine was a satirical invention, but an abrupt, disastrous phase transition is a possibility. Very early in the history of the universe, according to a leading cosmological model, empty space was full of energy. This state of affairs, called a false vacuum, was highly precarious. A new, more stable kind of vacuum appeared and, like ice-nine, it quickly took over. This transition unleashed a tremendous amount of energy and caused a brief runaway expansion of the cosmos. It is possible that another, even more stable kind of vacuum exists, however. As the universe expands and cools, tiny bubbles of this new kind of vacuum might appear and spread at nearly the speed of light. The laws of physics would change in their wake, and a blast of energy would dash everything to bits. "It makes for a beautiful story, but it's not very likely," says Piet Hut of the Institute for Advanced Studies in Princeton, New Jersey. He says he worries more about threats that scientists are more certain of"such as rogue black holes.

Giant solar flares-
Solar flares"more properly known as coronal mass ejections"are enormous magnetic outbursts on the sun that bombard Earth with a torrent of high-speed subatomic particles. Earth's atmosphere and magnetic field negate the potentially lethal effects of ordinary flares. But while looking through old astronomical records, Bradley Schaefer of Yale University found evidence that some perfectly normal-looking, sunlike stars can brighten briefly by up to a factor of 20. Schaefer believes these stellar flickers are caused by superflares, millions of times more powerful than their common cousins. Within a few hours, a superflare on the sun could fry Earth and begin disintegrating the ozone layer (see #2). Although there is persuasive evidence that our sun doesn't engage in such excess, scientists don't know why superflares happen at all, or whether our sun could exhibit milder but still disruptive behavior. And while too much solar activity could be deadly, too little of it is problematic as well. Sallie Baliunas at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics says many solar-type stars pass through extended quiescent periods, during which they become nearly 1 percent dimmer. That might not sound like much, but a similar downturn in the sun could send us into another ice age. Baliunas cites evidence that decreased solar activity contributed to 17 of the 19 major cold episodes on Earth in the last 10,000 years.

Flood-basalt volcanism-
In 1783, the Laki volcano in Iceland erupted, spitting out three cubic miles of lava. Floods, ash, and fumes wiped out 9,000 people and 80 percent of the livestock. The ensuing starvation killed a quarter of Iceland's population. Atmospheric dust caused winter temperatures to plunge by 9 degrees in the newly independent United States. And that was just a baby's burp compared with what the Earth can do. Sixty-five million years ago, a plume of hot rock from the mantle burst through the crust in what is now India. Eruptions raged century after century, ultimately unleashing a quarter-million cubic miles of lava"the Laki eruption 100,000 times over. Some scientists still blame the Indian outburst, not an asteroid, for the death of the dinosaurs. An earlier, even larger event in Siberia occurred just about the time of the Permian-Triassic extinction, the most thorough extermination known to paleontology. At that time 95 percent of all species were wiped out.
Sulfurous volcanic gases produce acid rains. Chlorine-bearing compounds present yet another threat to the fragile ozone layer"a noxious brew all around. While they are causing short-term destruction, volcanoes also release carbon dioxide that yields long-term greenhouse-effect warming.The last big pulse of flood-basalt volcanism built the Columbia River plateau about 17 million years ago. We're ripe for another.

In Conclusion these are just four of the twenty situations I can present......... All of these aren't a matter of it will happen in 2012 but this could happen at any time. They are naturally occurring phenomena, they are supported by scientific evidence. The extinction of the human race is inevitable.

http://discovermagazine.com...
Debate Round No. 2
gavstrk

Con

gavstrk forfeited this round.
emospongebob527

Pro

My resolution remains unrefuted

Extend all arguments

Vote Con
Debate Round No. 3
gavstrk

Con

gavstrk forfeited this round.
emospongebob527

Pro

I apologize for my fateful typo in the previous round I meant to put "Vote Pro" instead I put "Vote Con"

Now.......

My resolution remains unrefuted.

Extend.

Vote Pro.
Debate Round No. 4
1 comment has been posted on this debate.
Posted by RationalMadman 5 years ago
RationalMadman
Who would be stupid enough to assert knowing the end of the world? BOP is on pro... too easy for con.
No votes have been placed for this debate.