The Instigator
Lickdafoot
Pro (for)
Winning
15 Points
The Contender
F-16_Fighting_Falcon
Con (against)
Losing
2 Points

For Higher Learning, online courses are a more beneficial option than universities

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Post Voting Period
The voting period for this debate has ended.
after 5 votes the winner is...
Lickdafoot
Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 9/3/2011 Category: Education
Updated: 5 years ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 6,369 times Debate No: 18161
Debate Rounds (4)
Comments (15)
Votes (5)

 

Lickdafoot

Pro

I thank con for agreeing to this debate! I'm in the process of deciding whether or not to take online courses to finish my degree. Hopefully this debate will help myself and others who need to make this important decision.

As Pro, I will show that taking online courses can be a more beneficial option than enrolling in a university. Con will show that universities are more beneficial than online courses.

1st round for acceptance, definitions, clarifications.
2nd round for opening statements, rebuttals.
3rd round rebuttals
4th round closing statements

beneficial: advantageous; helpful [1]

University: an institution of learning of the highest level, having a college of liberal arts and a program of graduate studies together with several professional schools, as of theology, law, medicine, and engineering, and authorized to confer both undergraduate and graduate degrees. [2]

Online Courses: specifically online courses that can be used towards a degree. No in person meetings, classes, etc.

1. http://dictionary.reference.com...
2. http://dictionary.reference.com...

F-16_Fighting_Falcon

Con

I thank Lickdafoot for instigating this challenge and I accept the terms. Good luck.
Debate Round No. 1
Lickdafoot

Pro

For now I will give a brief overview of why college online courses are an overall more beneficial option than enrolling in a University.

Cost

Universities are extremely expensive. In many cases, the cost of four years at a university greatly outweighs the potential pay benefits of earning the degree.

Starting pay for psychologist with a bachelors degree is 20,000 per year. [1]The average cost of an in-state college is 7,605 per year, and out of state is about 11,990 per year. [2] We don’t even have to do the math to see that this is very expensive and the average psychologist will be crushed with the heavy burden of paying back college loans. It could take years, or a lifetime, before the debt is negated through the person’s hard work.

Online courses, on the other hand, can be much cheaper and more cost efficient. In my next post, I will expand on this point and show the ways in which online courses are more beneficial financially.

And lets face it, unless a person gets into an ivy league school, an online degree has much weight as a University degree when it comes to landing that job.

Time Efficiency

Universities are a full time job. Many people at universities have a small part time job that gives them minimal experience and usually doesn’t pertain to the field they are studying. Trying to maintain a f-time job and take classes is very stressful. It takes time to drive to a university, find a parking spot (sometimes this can take an hour or more,) and make it into class on time. Balancing time can become very stressful and the more stress load a person has, the less they are learning, and the less the are achieving their goals at the university. On the other hand, online courses are more lenient with time constraints. The person can take classes which adhere to their schedules, and there is no wasted time driving to and from the university.


Option Advantage

Many of people going into universities change their major halfway through, some more than once. Most universities are structured for certain majors. Online courses give more options to a person still deciding what they want to do. As they work in the real world, gaining experience, they can decide their pace and what they want to learn. At Universities, tuition is paid by semester. This means that one would want to pile as many courses into one semester as they can, and all of them should pertain to the major. This can create stress on a person who isn’t quite sure which avenue they want to take. Online courses can be paid by course, meaning that a person can enroll in courses that comply with their workload and comply with their interests. If they have a change of heart about majors, they lost the cost of only a few courses, rather than a whole semester worth of tuition.

Experience

One of the most important ways to excel in the business world is by having experience. Those of us who have put in more time will get more benefits. With online college courses, a person can put in their time and gain their degree cohesively. They will excel faster, and be four years ahead, in experience and salary, of the person who took the University route.

So we see here that online courses are more beneficial to a persons career. The costs, time efficiency, option advantage, and experienced gain through online courses are more optimum than Universities. I will be expanding on these points and more in the next round.

1. http://www.umsl.edu...
2.http://www.collegeboard.com...
F-16_Fighting_Falcon

Con

I thank Lickdafoot for agreeing to debate this topic with me and instigating the challenge. I wish her luck in finishing her degree and will show through this debate why enrolling in a University and physically attending classes is more beneficial than enrolling in online courses.

I have three contentions that I will make in addition to refuting Pro's four opening arguments. I apologize to Con for the late response. I only had 20 minutes when I started but I wanted to give her something to respond to.

I will follow a similar structure to Con's argument i.e. making brief opening statements in this round, and elaborate and cite sources in the next round.

ARGUMENTS

C1) The College Experience
(A) Attending college helps students make friends in similar fields. It is far easier to make friends while in college due to the shared experience that all students go through. Everyone is new, so there is never a feeling of being the only "new kid" in college.

(B) Working together with classmates is very important. It fosters teamwork and leads to further friendships and networking.


C2) The classroom Experience
(A) Discussion of material in the classroom improves communication skills. This is important to have for most jobs. Sitting at home and clicking various options on the computer with a mouse is a poor substitute for a classroom discussion. Even lessons with audio don't compare with the physical experience.


C3) Greater interaction with professors
(A) Leads to job references
One of the main reasons to go to college is the networking opportunities available. Students can get to know their professors and get references to the best jobs and graduate schools. Nearly all graduate schools require letters of references from the student's professors.

(B) Ability to work as a research assistant or teaching assistant
Getting to knoe the professors leads to jobs while on campus. A student can conduct research in their field, or if they a grad student, can work as a teaching assistant teaching undergraduate students.

Attending a University encourage students to be very involved and engaged. Online courses while possibly replicating the course material cannot replicate the actual college experience.


REBUTTALS

1) Cost
It is interesting to note how Pro's source (Collegeboard) mentions that the average amount of aid for a full-time undergraduate student was about $11,500, including more than $6,000 in grants that don’t have to be repaid [1]. The average cost of an in-state college is $7605 per year. So, pretty much everyone who recieves financial aid will be able to pay for college. The important thing is for my opponent to explore the options for recieving financial aid as opposed to foregoing the benefits of attending a University by taking online courses. Since financial aid is given on a need basis in addition to being given on a merit basis, students who cannot afford college find it easier to get financial aid.


2) Time Efficiency
Universitities don't have to be "a full time job". Many students work full time and take classes part time. Also students can work with their professors to do research in the field that they are studying. They can also do internships in the same field.


3) Option Advantage
Most Universities do allow students to change majors and offer many course plans and guides so that students can graduate in 4 years. Academic advisors usually take care of people who want to change majors. If my opponent proves in the next round that there is a tendency to pile as many courses as possible in one semester, I will continue to argue this point. However, I have never heard of students piling courses in one semester.


4) Experience
Going to a University helps a student gets experience, as I mentioned previously, much more than online courses do.I will expand in the next round.

These are the arguments that I will be expanding on in the next round and am looking forward to an interesting debate.


Sources
[1] http://www.collegeboard.com...

Debate Round No. 2
Lickdafoot

Pro

I thank my opponent for the kind words! I will begin by going over my opponent’s cases, and then move on to the rebuttals towards my cases.

C1. The College Experience

College relationships are a small stepping-stone towards developing interaction in the workplace. After all, we go to school to prepare us for our careers, right? Well, experience in the workplace is more integral to career building than experience in a boarding setting. Online courses promote educating oneself and building work experience at the same time.

Many companies operate on their own personal motto's and expectancies tailored to the advancement in that field. Interaction with employees is usually structured around some sort of managerial concept. Balancing competition with camaraderie is a skill that can be practiced in many job atmospheres. College side-jobs are usually laid-back and don’t have much to do with ones career of choice, due to universities being the full-time responsibility, therefore not preparing the student towards expectancies of companies in a given field.

C2. The Classroom Experience

Online classrooms have their own unique experience that many respond well to. The National Survey of Student Engagement, surveying freshman and senior college students across the country in 2008, shows that online students were more likely than in-class students to:

Participate in course activities that challenged them intellectually
Participate in discussions that enhanced of different cultures
Discuss important topics within their major
Have more deep approaches to learning in their coursework [1]

C3. Greater interaction with professors.

Professors of online courses often require the same credentials as universities. Therefore, interaction with online professors can be just as engaging, albeit different, as universities. There are online counselors and advisers to help the students as well.

Online teaching can be done through chat room and emails. Because of this, communication is more detailed to compensate for the lack of bodily clues. A student can read through the course material and take time to think about what questions they need to ask the teacher. Because of this, teaching can be more personal, as the professor has the time to respond to each persons inquiries, rather than being limited to discussing only that which will fit in the time crunch of a typical class. Because everything is done on the computer, a student can go back and re-read the course as much as it takes to sink in. No need for quick note taking which might miss key points.

Professors are still available to give references, letters of recommendation, and life advice to the students.

P1. Cost

Financial aid will work with any accredited college. This includes online college courses. [2]

The competition of online colleges are driving the prices further and further down. Lamar University is offering education for just $ 413 a course. [3] For an average 121 credit degree, at 3 credits a course, this is a total of just $ 16,644. This price is already much cheaper than the average public University degree.

But this is just the tip of the iceberg! The actual cost of college spans far beyond that of a tuition fee. Room & board, campus fees, books, gas, and a plethora of small-scale costs attribute to a person’s education expenses. Many of these can be eliminated with online courses.

Many students opt for room and board. The price varies according to college and plan, but can usually cost over $ 5,000 per semester for in-state students and more for out-of-state students. Even if a student opts for off-campus living, finding a place near the campus can cost just as much if not more when utilities are added.

On-Campus living or not, gas is still an issue. Gas prices are at a critical high, and transporting to and fro can be taxing on the wallet. Even for someone living on campus, prices of traveling back to home can be costly. Meanwhile, online courses have no extra living expenses. You can access your class from home or anywhere that you can access a computer.


P2. Time Efficiency

Taking classes part time at an actual institution can be very stressful. A person would have to take their school supplies with them to work, and then transport from work to school before going home. Online courses can be taken anywhere; such as at home after work by the persons convenience. Because of this convenience, online courses are said to be on average completed faster than their in-time counterparts.

Accelerated online courses are available which make the class even than much more time efficient. The credits and criteria remain the same, while the course is completed 5 to 9 weeks quicker. [4] Condensed classes mean a quicker degree. Many online colleges offer accelerated courses.

P3. Option Advantage

I agree that it is not common for students to pile on classes due to the stress load, but that was beside the point. Universities are paid by semester so slow-pacing as you go along is not an option. An undecided major can take more effort and money to accommodate in a university.

P4. Experience

I’ve already discussed work experience in this post, but would like to add another statement pertaining to online courses and experience. Actually, with online courses, work experience can give you credits. An “experiential learning portfolio” can be written to apply credits from past experiences, provided that you show that the experience taught you the particular courses objective. This option is not available through regular universities.


I would like to add one more case about overall convenience. I have touched on this briefly here and there, but it is worth expressing once again. Online courses give the ability to educate yourself from anywhere. You can take a class in your pajamas in bed. You can browse through as many universities as you want without having to travel to them. You can do your work anywhere that has a computer. You can even go to class while taking a vacation! Your education does not have to be put on hold.

Everything is done on your own time. No rushing, no missed ideas. Convenience is the key.

I will leave you with one last tidbit about education of the future. Online education is education of the future. Because of internet access, there are universities opening up for free! University of The People is an online school that has certain bachelors and associates degree programs without a tuition cost. The only cost is a one-time $10 admission fee. This school is not yet accredited, but is in the process of becoming accredited. [5] Many other online colleges offer their courses for free with no added degree. With enough advancements like these, education is becoming more readily available. The world can become a place where being educated is not looked down upon by the masses, but accepted as standard.


Sources:
1. http://nsse.iub.edu...
2. http://www.educationconnection.com...
3. http://www.usnews.com...
4. http://www.onlinecollege.org...
5. http://www.uopeople.org...
F-16_Fighting_Falcon

Con

ARGUMENTS

C1) The College Experience
My opponent's response to the fact that people in college can make more friends, and work together on class projects is that work experience is more important. She also considers college jobs to be laid back. Now that would be true if the students worked at a restaurant for example while going to college.

My suggestion is not that people take a laid back, part-time job but for the students to help the professors in their research, conduct studies, assist with data acquisition in the labs, and if a graduate student, be a teaching assistant. Those are jobs that are directly related to one's career field.

This way, the college experience can be had in addition to work experience. It is a win-win. Whereas with online courses, you get neither.


C2) The classroom Experience
Pro cites a study which essentially shows that online students participate more in course activities. Now the study clearly mentions that the online learners that they surveyed were older, first-generation students as well as transfer students [1]. Now it is likely that older students and first-generation students pay attention in class because they are more mature, and they also understand the value of college more than younger students whose parents have gone to college and are now funding their college.

It can clearly be seen that the higher levels of engagement is not because of the fact that they are taking online courses. Correlation is not equal to causation in this case and my opponent does not prove that it is. In a study conducted by Webster University in Missouri, it was found that lack of face to face, personal or social contact with instructor or students was among the main disadvantages of an online course [2].

Many professors in traditional universities now post class notes online negating the need to take quick notes in class [4]. It is the best of both worlds.


C3) Greater interaction with professors
My main point here was that students can get to know their professors and get references and letters of recommendation from them as well get information on new opportunities available on campus and to network with them. Can an online professor give recommendations on the same level? They never even met you! Maybe they have the same qualifications as a University professor as my opponent points out, but the more important thing when getting a recommendation or a reference is how well a person knows you. Online interactions cannot compare with actually getting to know a professor in class and in office hours.

My opponent says that online teaching can be done through chatroom and emails which she asserts is more personalized. Now, it will be difficult to prove that a chatroom with 25 people is more personalized than a classroom with 25 people. In fact, in a classroom, the student can hang back after class and talk to the professor, something unavailable to online students. Emails are the standard form of communication even in traditional classes, so this isn't something that can be given as an advantage of online learning.


REBUTTALS

1) Cost
My opponent now agrees that both online and traditional courses have financial aid available. Her main contention is that attending a University has other costs besides tuition such as room and board, books, and gas.

Now, students have a choice to stay in the dorm or not. If in the dorm, they can walk to class eliminating the price for gas. They also eliminate the price for groceries because colleges generally include a meal plan as part of their room and board price [3]. Many scholarships cover room and board as well. This eliminates rent, groceries and gas. Even if the scholarship doesn't cover room and board, you still need to pay rent and groceries when you are taking online courses.

Gas prices are at $3.60 per gallon [5]. In a car that gets 20 miles per gallon, if the University is 10 miles away and class meets twice a week, it is as low as $7.20 per week. And don't forget that you are paying for either room and board or gas not both.As for books, online courses require books too. This can't be an expense only for people attending a traditional university. In fact, online course may require more books.

In summary, online courses too are riddled with those little costs that plague a University student. Taking online courses isn't an escape from those costs. While the costs of attending a University may be slightly higher, the question we should ask is: Is it worth it to save such a small amount of money at the expense of missing out on an actual college experience?


2) Time Efficiency
Accelerated courses are also available in Universities. Many courses in some Universities including psychology can be completed in as little as 5 weeks in the summer [6]. This benefit is not exclusive to online courses.


3) Option Advantage
Pro's point here is that an undecided major takes more time and effort to accomodate in a University. My question is: what is the point of taking online courses, if you don't know what classes you want to take? Online courses are primarily for people who are already working and want to gain knowledge in a specific field [8].


4) Credits for experience
Again, this isn't specific to online courses. Many universities give credits for internships as well as for classes taken in high school. An internship can get students between 3 to 12 credits depending on what they did [7].


Conclusion
To conclude, online courses show barely any reduction in price but show a big loss in prestige and the ability to get recommendations and get to know your professors. People taking online courses lose the entire college experience. Online courses provide nothing that a student can't get in an actual university. To get a degree, it is far more advisable to pursue options such as financial aid and scholarships rather than take online courses and forego your whole college experience because that is something that you can't replace.

Sources
[1] http://nsse.iub.edu...;(page 16)
[2] http://www.hiceducation.org...
[3] http://dining.ucr.edu...
[4] http://cnc.ucr.edu...
[5] http://205.254.135.24/oil_gas/petroleum/data_publications/wrgp/mogas_home_page.html
[6] http://student08.ucr.edu...
[7] http://internships.about.com...
[8] http://oedb.org...
Debate Round No. 3
Lickdafoot

Pro

I thank my opponent for the interestig debate and wish him luck in his final round.

I will show in this post that Online courses are the more practible, responsible choice. Education is the top priority over networking and a fun environment. Remember, we are living in a time of great recession. The way to counteract this is by getting an education that garners success, while at the same time saving valuable resources and time.

The College Experience


My opponent suggests that a student should, instead of maintaining a normal job, help out their professors. In response to this, I have one simple question for you readers. Would you rather gain experience by working for free, or for money?

Also i would like to point out that teacher assistant positions are usually reserved for seniors or graduate students.

Finally, 4 years of work experience looks more accredible on any resume than years of work within a college. Work experience outside of college is rather difficult to find for full-time university students, and is most conducive to one taking online classes.

The Classroom Experience

I cannot proove that correlation equals causation, but we can use logic to understand why this study points towards benifits in online classes. We see that the survey considers both freshman and senior college students. If my opponents point that age = maturity= better class communication, then we should be seeing answers that are closer in response for the senior students. We also know that peer pressure weighs heavily on a student, whether it is a conscious thought or not. The internet gives an anonymity factor, which can help a student to let their walls down and be more responsive in their classroom. There is no fear of being judged for a silly question. This shifts the focus from social networking to education.This logic shows how there is a potential and likely cause of the results based on the dynamic of online classes.

My opponents link to the survey he posted is not working for me. So I cannot say much about it's validity, but I will point out that his survey focuses on students from only one college, while mine is a nationwide survey. A nationwide survey will generally show more accurate results. It is also worth considering that students enrolled in a university will have more biased answers against online courses.

It's clear to see that different people have different levels of engagement in the classroom, and different things that stimulate their minds. Online students can do their work on their own time, when they are in the best mindset for learning. Many students would say that this online experience is more cohesive with their stressload and ability to learn.

Cost

My opponent misconstrued my point here. Financial aid is available for both online and regular college courses. The point is, tuition at College is generally higher than tuition for online courses. Financial aid can decrease the amount of tuition, so it follows that online courses and financial aid would be the optimum option for saving.

Let me also remind you here that online tuition is paid by class, not semester. There are more options for pacing of payments. You can pay for one or two classes without having to take a loan out, therefore not having to struggle with interest.

Also, I will use my opponents own source to show that many online classes don't require books. [1] There are also a long list of Campus fees such as an id or parking. My opponent missed the fact that students living on campus will still have to consider the cost of transportation (gas) to and from home on breaks or weeekend visits. All of these little extra costs are simply not there online.

Time Effeciency

The classes that my opponent brings up are only avaliable in the summer; not for regular school year curriculum. Only so many classes can be taken during the summer. If the student does not live near campus, this becomes an even more limited option.

Online accelerated courses can be taken any time; so that the student has the option of enrolling into all of their classes at accelerated speed. I will also reiterate that online classes can be taken at in time, to the convenience of the student. This will allow them to get things done on their own time, which will make their learning more effective and efficient. Matching time of day to student preferences can rasie grades, improve test scores, and improve behavior. [2] Online courses can be scheduled around this for a students optimum learning experience.

Option Advantage

The point here is that online courses give a plethora of avenues one can take. This includes pacing, and specialty degree programs where elective courses are not required.

Experience

Credits for internships isn't quite the same as credits for life experience. The online student who has either schooling, interning, or work experience can start ahead; while the university student with the latter is left at square one.

Conclusion

Online classes are the more practical option for our fast-paced society. Online courses are cheaper, more time efficient, and more convenient. One can truly say that they have control of when and what they learn. Online courses are for the individual who wants to get ahead without investing all of their hard-earned resources, time and effort. Online courses are the fast track to the reward: A degree worthy of a high paying job and ultimate success in the work place.


1.http://oedb.org...
2. http://www.family-source.com...

F-16_Fighting_Falcon

Con

I thank my opponent for her response.


The College Experience
As I mentioned, students miss out on the entire college experience. My opponent assumes that doing research for a professor or being a teaching assistant must be done for free. This is not true. Many universities offer paid research assistant positions [1][2][3][4]. Three of the links that I showed show research opportunites in psychology, a field that my opponent is interested in.

Besides research, there is also the opportuntity to do internships outside of the University. By the time they graduate, the student can get a full college experience, research experience, work experience, and gain contacts and improve their network. Online courses are an inadequate substitute for this.


The classroom experience
My opponent says that the internet gives an anonymity factor allowing students to ask more questions. But is it beneficial for the student to be "anonymous"? Students can always go to office hours to ask more questions in a real University, an option not available in online courses. (My opponent agreed that online courses will not include office hours). This makes the student-faculty interaction private but not anonymous, just the way it should be.


Cost
My main point here is that if the cost is too high, students must pursue options for financial aid. Online classes will still have books if the course needs them. The determining factor is whether the subject material requires books, not whether the class is taken at a University or online. But the bigger issue is that online classes provide only a small part of the required education at a slightly lower price.


Time
My opponent says that online courses can be done at the student's own time. There is really no logical basis for this if you think about it: Online classes may meet at particular times just like in a University. There are many class times to choose from just like in a University. Online classes assign homework or other assignments which can be done online at the student's convenience just like in a University. My opponent compares assignements given by online courses to actual class meetings in a university. That is why she reached the conclusion that online classes can be done "on your own time". However, that is not entirely logically accurate. That is an apple to guitar comparison.

Travel time is usually not a big percentage of class or work time and is realtively insignificant.

With the point about time efficiency negated, my opponent's point about work experience is negated as well. Students can work the same job while going to college that they would work while taking online classses.


Closing thoughts
My opponent says: "Education is the top priority over networking and a fun environment."

At this point we must ask ourselves, what is education?

Why do people get educated?

Is education complete without the full experience of going to classes, participating in discussions, working with friends, forming lasting relationships with professors who could give you references, making connections with students and faculty to land the perfect job?

Is course material the only thing that is important at the exclusion of everything else?

Why do the majority of undergraduate students go to universities instead of taking online courses?

The college environment is part of the learning process. Networking is required to get the best jobs. These factors are just as important as taking the required course material. Online classes while providing a few conveniences is not a substitute for a real education.


I thank Lickdafoot for this interesting and enlightening debate. I hope that she better understood both the Pro's and Con's of online courses through her own research as well as my arguments. I too learned a lot from this debate.


Sources
[1] http://biology.ufl.edu...
[2] http://www.columbia.edu...
[3] http://www.kent.edu...
[4] http://psychology.uwaterloo.ca...
Debate Round No. 4
15 comments have been posted on this debate. Showing 1 through 10 records.
Posted by 1stLordofTheVenerability 5 years ago
1stLordofTheVenerability
I've also found that a student has to work harder, online, as a professor won't point out which texts and phrases to highlite for exams. One has to actually thoroughly read the textbook until one knows it, backward and forward.
Posted by 1stLordofTheVenerability 5 years ago
1stLordofTheVenerability
I took several online courses throughout high school (and one online). I find myself to be indifferent, albeit that when I'm online, I can fulfill further research and explore a topic in-depth. In the classroom, one merely has to listen to a shallow lecture and summarized basics from a bored educator before completing repetitive work. O_o
Posted by Double_R 5 years ago
Double_R
Exactly what Roy said. I took an online course one time, I never finished. I also took a class to get my insurance certificate, I got the highest score in my class on the final and on the state test. It is easier to learn around other people the online I think (but this site is an exception for some strange reason).
Posted by F-16_Fighting_Falcon 5 years ago
F-16_Fighting_Falcon
@RoyLatham, thanks for voting and for your feedback. That was really helpful, and I can use it in future debates.
Posted by RoyLatham 5 years ago
RoyLatham
The debate focused almost entirely on the cost and on the value of contacts. By those criteria, I give the nod to Pro. Online is cheaper and work references are more valuable that academic contacts, at least in the American system. In Japan, school contacts are expected to be maintained and used for a lifetime, but not here. It didn't come up, by academic references are better for a career in academia.

I think that Con should have argued that pressure to learn is important and that it is greater on campus, that students are now often taught to work in teams on campus projects, and that having classmates studying the same things supports interactive learning. Whether or not those things are important enough depends upon the individual and the subject of study. There must be some studies on the effectiveness of online learning; I don't know. None of this entered into the debate.

There are good studies of the economic value of a college education that were not referenced. It often pays, but not always. Nonetheless, it's obvious that if all things are equal except cost, then cheaper is better.

The cost of running a car comes up in debates. Reference the auto club; it's 62 cents a mile, with only a quarter of the cost in gasoline. Time spent commuting is also a cost.
Posted by BlackVoid 5 years ago
BlackVoid
Man, there are a ton of points in here. Hard to judge, but I'll try.
Posted by F-16_Fighting_Falcon 5 years ago
F-16_Fighting_Falcon
Lordknuckle, many accredited universities offer online programs with highly qualified faculty, so they can teach competently. For me, the bigger issue was that students get no face-to-face interaction with this faculty, no networking opportunities, no references and hence will have a more difficult time finding a job.
Posted by Lordknukle 5 years ago
Lordknukle
I think F-16 missed out on the most important point.
Regular style universities have a higher level of academic teaching.

Overall, good debate though.
Posted by F-16_Fighting_Falcon 5 years ago
F-16_Fighting_Falcon
lol! Titties were unintentional, guitars were intentional.
Posted by Lickdafoot 5 years ago
Lickdafoot
@ bluesteel. thanks for taking the time to read & vote! I agree that f-16 brought up lots of good arguments. i was nervous about the "prestige" thing. the best i found was a site saying 70% of employers consider online degrees to be as acceptable as university degrees, but it slipped by without me having to bring it up. (f-16 did go there, but it was a short one-liner.)
5 votes have been placed for this debate. Showing 1 through 5 records.
Vote Placed by seraine 5 years ago
seraine
LickdafootF-16_Fighting_FalconTied
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Total points awarded:32 
Reasons for voting decision: Pro won the money point and Con won the experience point, but Con was kind of weak on the experience point while Pro was strong on the money point. In addition, Pro brought up factors like jobs and convenience that Con didn't sufficiently negate. 3:2 Pro
Vote Placed by Double_R 5 years ago
Double_R
LickdafootF-16_Fighting_FalconTied
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Reasons for voting decision: Good debate but should have been more clearly defined. Pro seemed to argue from a profesional standpoint while Con included the "college experience". While Cons case was certainly relevant Pros case is more consistent with the purpose of college so I found her points more convincing. I think Con could have made a stronger case if he included the pressure of college in terms of passing a class. If you fail an online course you dissapoint no one but yourself which sadly does not motivate everyone.
Vote Placed by RoyLatham 5 years ago
RoyLatham
LickdafootF-16_Fighting_FalconTied
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Reasons for voting decision: This debate focused on the cost of education, social interactions like alliances and recommendations, and the experience of college. Oddly, their was tacit agreement that the quality of education per se was the same. Online wins the cost argument. Are recommendations from professors better than from a boss at work? Work recommendations are better for getting a job, as Pro pointed out. I think Con should have taken the approach that the on-campus learning environment is better.
Vote Placed by 000ike 5 years ago
000ike
LickdafootF-16_Fighting_FalconTied
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Reasons for voting decision: I wish that the resolution was more clear,"more beneficial" in what sense? Pro and Con aimed at different angles that were difficult to compare. Pro successfully proved online courses better in the financial sense, to which was not sufficiently negated; but Con successfully proved online courses to be better in the sense of "college experience", to which was also not sufficiently negated. The decision ultimately came down to which factor was stronger, money or experience. Mney is the deal breakr
Vote Placed by bluesteel 5 years ago
bluesteel
LickdafootF-16_Fighting_FalconTied
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Total points awarded:30 
Reasons for voting decision: wow, great debate you two. I felt like it was neck-and-neck the whole way through. I think F-16 does a good job negating the study, but doesn't make quite a strong enough case against cost, which lickdafoot spends a great deal of time developing. In the last round, F-16 just claims that savings are only moderate, but $16,000 total is really cheap. I really want to vote for F-16, but I just don't think the impacts of why networking is important and why being a research assistant is important are