The Instigator
DivaExcel
Pro (for)
Losing
0 Points
The Contender
Emilrose
Con (against)
Winning
3 Points

Formal letters are completely unnecessary

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Post Voting Period
The voting period for this debate has ended.
after 1 vote the winner is...
Emilrose
Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 11/13/2017 Category: Society
Updated: 2 months ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 156 times Debate No: 105011
Debate Rounds (3)
Comments (1)
Votes (1)

 

DivaExcel

Pro

Formal letters aren't necessary because the writer or the sender will not be able to completely express him/herself due to fact that the entire letter is polite and simple. Nothing more, nothing less.

And if someone writes a letter that isn't formal and sends to the person/people in authority, it could be discarded and considered as rubbish which just shows that our opinions and feelings and voices can't be heard until they're expressed in a particular, subtle, polite way.
Emilrose

Con

Accepted.

Why Formal Letters are Necessary

Let's assume that a few years ago, I received acceptance to a university. Naturally, I would've received a letter informing me of my unsurprising and expected acceptance. However, the letter would not have read:

'hai emily, u got acepted in to >>*this*<< school, get rewdy 4 it...vey stronge admisssion btw...u so grate, contratz'.

No, indeed it would read:

'Dear Miss Emily,

I am writing you to inform of your acceptance into >>*this*<< school, congratulations! You may contact us via this>>*email address*<<, or on >>**this**<< number for confirmation of your studying with us and further details of your course/fees and housing arrangements.'

The same can be said for any other type of 'formal letter', whether it be a monthly bill, an invitation to a wedding, confirmation of your exams results, etc.

Essentially, if a letter is supposed to be formal, then it must be formal. Informal letters would inevitably encourage unintelligent and unsophisticated dialect; undermining the most important of matters, thus rendering them frivolous and insignificant.
Debate Round No. 1
DivaExcel

Pro

You sort of, kind of, have a point there but... nah.

In my most honest opinion, formal letters aren't really all that necessary. You could literally send a note saying "I need a job at the post of ______________" and then add your CV and stuff there.

Or instead of the usual boring acceptance letter sent by the school telling me that I've been admitted, it could be a note.

And informal letters don't necessarily have to be written in slangs. You could still use good punctuation and follow all the rules of grammar but the nature of the letter wouldn't be serious. It would just be like you're talking to a friend or to your parents.
Emilrose

Con

R1 Rebuttals:

Pro states in round one that formal letters are unnecessary because 'because the writer or the sender will not be able to completely express him/herself due to fact that the entire letter is polite and simple', but the entire point of a formal letter is that it is indeed polite and simple.'

The purpose is to inform the reader of an important matter, not to engage the reader in friendly or casual discourse; one does not write formal letters to express themselves, one writes formal letters because there is a need to considerably, but sensibly, convey something of moderate urgency to the individual recipient of the letter.


'And if someone writes a letter that isn't formal and sends to the person/people in authority, it could be discarded and considered as rubbish which just shows that our opinions and feelings and voices can't be heard until they're expressed in a particular, subtle, polite way.'

If anything, Pro has outlined here why we should keep formal letters. Many persons in authority are naturally accustomed to formal writing, so if they were to receive something informally, they may not treat it with the significance it requires; or they may reach the conclusion that the person who has composed it is of inferior intellect. There's some traditions and customs that exist for a reason; to ensure that things are kept simple. Informal letters to formal institutions would inevitably complicate matters.

R2 Rebuttals:

Pro begins this round by acknowledging that I have made a point, but then asserting that I actually haven't made one; which is confusing for readers to say the least.

'Or instead of the usual boring acceptance letter sent by the school telling me that I've been admitted, it could be a note.'

There's certain things in life that need to be boring, formal letters being one of them.


'And informal letters don't necessarily have to be written in slangs. You could still use good punctuation and follow all the rules of grammar but the nature of the letter wouldn't be serious. It would just be like you're talking to a friend or to your parents.'

Well, if we were to somehow change the tradition of formal letters, there is nothing to prevent slang or improper grammar from being used-especially if Pros example of 'like talking to a friend' was to be applied, as slang and informal language is often used in replacement of formal and proper language in discussion among friends.

Debate Round No. 2
DivaExcel

Pro

That was funny and honest. I understand your side of the argument and I understand my side of the argument but as a closing remark, I'll just say that formal letters aren't really all that useful. Making something feel important because society says it is, doesn't make all that sense. Letters are a means of communication so it would be better to get straight to the point than to start with all the formal greeting and stuff that nobody really needs to read.
Emilrose

Con

Further Rebuttals/Closing Arguments:

'I understand my side of the argument but as a closing remark, I'll just say that formal letters aren't really all that useful. Making something feel important because society says it is, doesn't make all that sense.'

Well, there are many things that society deems important-and generally speaking, they all make sense. Formal letters fulfill a purpose of informing someone of an issue of significance, but again, in a clear and sensible way. For example, there's a distinction between a university, or a place of work, etc. and a friend or family member-the former you have no intimate or emotional relation to (it is a professional body), and the latter, you do have an intimate and emotional relation to. I.e, your boss (when writing a letter) isn't going to sound/write the same as a close friend; and this is perfectly normal.

'Letters are a means of communication so it would be better to get straight to the point than to start with all the formal greeting and stuff that nobody really needs to read.'

This is easily negated by the fact that formal letters do get straight to the point, this is their purpose; and this is why formal letters, for formal matters, are better than informal ones.

Anyway, I will leave the debate here and ask that voters vote CON. Thanks to Pro for instigating this topic.
Debate Round No. 3
1 comment has been posted on this debate.
Posted by SupaDudz 4 weeks ago
SupaDudz
You got Em and Unstob to debate wow i'm jealy!!
1 votes has been placed for this debate.
Vote Placed by zmikecuber 1 month ago
zmikecuber
DivaExcelEmilroseTied
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Total points awarded:03 
Reasons for voting decision: Arguments to Con. She presented cases where formal letters are fitting and proper as well as necessary, thus the resolution remains negated. Con points out that if an informal letter was used, the recipient would misunderstand the nature of the matter, and that there are many occasions when it is necessary to indicate the importance of the matter. Pro argues that you could always just use an informal letter to do the job, but as Con points out, this simply does not work in certain situations.