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el_tecnico
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The Contender
toughenough
Con (against)
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Free will and determinism are NOT compatible

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Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 7/6/2014 Category: Philosophy
Updated: 3 years ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 403 times Debate No: 58621
Debate Rounds (5)
Comments (2)
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el_tecnico

Pro

Debate formatted as follows:

Round 1- Accept

Round 2-Openings (No rebuttals!)

Round 3-Expansion of ideas, rebuttals allowed

Round 4-Only rebuttals accepted

Round 5-Closing

In order to avoid devolving into semantics, accepting this debate means accepting the Oxford Dictionary's definition free will:

"The power of acting without the constraint of necessity or fate; the ability to act at one"s own discretion."

Questions in the comments, I'm looking forward to lively debate.
toughenough

Con

YOU CHOOSE TO BELIEVE IN DETERMINlSM!
Debate Round No. 1
el_tecnico

Pro

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toughenough

Con

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Debate Round No. 2
el_tecnico

Pro

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toughenough

Con

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Debate Round No. 3
el_tecnico

Pro

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toughenough

Con

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Debate Round No. 4
el_tecnico

Pro

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toughenough

Con

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Debate Round No. 5
2 comments have been posted on this debate. Showing 1 through 2 records.
Posted by evangambit 3 years ago
evangambit
If fate is defined as "the development of events beyond a person's control, regarded as determined by a supernatural power" these are not necessarily incompatible. If a super natural being does not exist, then the definition of "free will" is simplified to:

"The power of acting without constraint of necessity; the ability to act at one's own discretion".

Now it simply becomes a question of whether or not the "laws of physics" should tie into "necessity" or "one's own discretion".

It is my belief that the "necessity" and "discretion" of an action is what arises after realizing it is possible and thus "necessity" is not constrained by physics.

Taking "determinism" to mean something like "an infinitely powerful turing machine, given a starting state and the laws of physics, can perfectly simulate the universe, including humans' decisions and actions" while accepting "free will" to take on its more political/societal definition rather than its physical one (which seems like a ridiculous way to define it in my opinion), they seem reconcilable to me. Of course, my assumptions are my own. My takes on "necessity" and "discretion" are debatable.
Posted by Mike_10-4 3 years ago
Mike_10-4
Free will is confined within the deterministic matrix of the Laws of Nature, there are no exceptions. You do not have the free will to travel back and forth in time, pop into a parallel universe, travel faster than the speed of light, etc.
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