The Instigator
queeng
Con (against)
Winning
6 Points
The Contender
PeriodicPatriot
Pro (for)
Losing
0 Points

Glitz Beauty Pageants Held For Children aged 13 and Under

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Post Voting Period
The voting period for this debate has ended.
after 2 votes the winner is...
queeng
Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 12/25/2013 Category: Society
Updated: 3 years ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 989 times Debate No: 42944
Debate Rounds (3)
Comments (0)
Votes (2)

 

queeng

Con

I believe that children under the age of 13 should not be put into glitz beauty pageants because:

A. These pageants are judged solely on looks and appearance, not their personalities.

B. At a young age, these girls are dolled to the idea of "perfection".

C. These girls are more likely to have self esteem problems and other disorders when they get older.
PeriodicPatriot

Pro

I accept your challenge. I am looking forward to this debate.
Debate Round No. 1
queeng

Con

A. Glitz pageants are commonly split into three categories: swimwear, casual, and formal wear. In swimwear, at a young age most of these girls are put into bikinis and told to strut across the stage preforming their specialized routines. In formal and casual, these girls are given either skimpy clothing or over the top dresses. All of these girls, no matter the category, are instructed to show off their bodies and capture the attention of the judges through their looks and routines.

B. Parents pay lots of money to enter these pageants and the preparation is even more expensive. Without all the makeup and touchups done to these girls, they probably wouldn't even be recognizable. Mascara, foundation, and eyeliner, and even spray tans are heavily applied. Their hair is piled high on their heads and some of it isn't even theirs. A fake image of beauty is perceived.

C. These girls at such a young age are taught that in order to win, they need to be beautiful. When they grow up and all the glitz, glamour, and competition is gone, when they look in the mirror they won't see beautiful. These pageants can lead to horrible self esteem and eating disorders as a teenager.
PeriodicPatriot

Pro

A. According to my research, Glitz pagents meet a perfect on feminist standards, which most young girls need at that age. It meets feminist standards because Big hair (including fake hair), flawless makeup, spray tans, flippers (fake teeth) and nail extensions are used and most expected to the contestants. I have seen this before, and some person wanted to ban child pageants. Parents of children are sometimes criticized for entering their children in pageants. For instance, Shelby Colene Pannell, a sociologist, questions why parents would subject their children to gender socialization because pageants are the perfect setting for the” traditional” type of femininity
http://www.cbc.ca...

That is all I have to say. The link is proof.

Debate Round No. 2
queeng

Con

I can see where you're coming from here but there is a fine line between femininity and what some of these girls are put through during these pageants.

A. These pageants start as early as one year old girls. Is it okay to load makeup onto your babies face all to win best in show? For example, 4-year old Molly was in a casual glitz contest. Her costume and routine was based off of Dolly Parton. This would have been fine except for the fact her mother put her in C-cup chest enhancers and butt pads. Paisley, age 4, was Julia Roberts from Pretty Women. Again, this would have been fine, except Julia Robert's character was a prostitute. Another girl, 3 years old was Sandy from Grease, complete with a cigarette and her mother in the crowd reminding her " Don't forget to smoke!" Even in China, we have little girls in bikinis striking a pose for news reporters. Is this really the image we are putting into the generations' brains at such a young age? I'd hope not.

http://lifestyle.fr.msn.com...
http://ellengry.com...

B. Aside from how they dress, the process in which they get to that "perfect point" is worse. The
"traditional" type of femininity is not to be fake. Natural pageants capture the feminine aspects, not glitz. The Pageant Planet states, "...to compete in a Glitz pageant the first thing you will need to do is get glamor head-shots taken. These head-shots make little girls that look like plastic dolls, but they are too cute!" The two words that should have stood out to you are 'plastic dolls'. At this age, these girls need to be playing with Barbie, not trying to be her. In order to even walk onto the stage, it is recommended to have fake hair, deep spray tans, fake teeth, and then their specialized routine. Some even go as far waxing their eyebrows, against their will, and using colored contacts. ABC News reported that a California mother was injecting her 8-year old daughter's face with Botox to help with her glitz pageant. She claimed "Wrinkles aren't pretty on a little girls face." Not only was this not safe for her child, but her daughter even said "It hurt, but I'm used to the pain." And according to Pageant Planet, these routines are not complete without exaggerated eye lash batting, tilting of the head from side to side, and blowing lots of kisses to the judges.

http://www.thepageantplanet.com...
http://abcnews.go.com...

C. None of these things may be affecting the child dangerously now, but think of their future. After the years of dolling up and competing against others, what will happen when they grow up? They will be exposed to hundreds of other girls their age and they will look at themselves and start to compare. Their self esteem with plummet which can lead to severe depression. One mother refused her little girl dinner to make sure that she fit into her dress the next morning. What is her mother going to do when she grows up and starts skipping meals to make sure she fits into her clothes. That little girl will grow into an eating disorder like anorexia or bulimia.

In the long run, these pageants do more harm than they will ever do good. I strongly believe that natural pageant are so much better for society. Instead perfecting the outside of these girls, why not embrace their inner beauty as well. Fake isn't beautiful or cute. Beautiful is the real you.
PeriodicPatriot

Pro

In Toddlers and Tiaras, almost all of the contestants on the show are at lease under 10. I still watch it and I don't see how they treat the girls like dolls. Anyway, the purpose of glitz pageants are for femininity and tourism. Girls aren't trying to be perfect, they are not judgeed on looks, and yes, they are judged on personality and facial expressions. There are different meanings of the word 'glitz'.

http://www.answers.com...


Debate Round No. 3
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2 votes have been placed for this debate. Showing 1 through 2 records.
Vote Placed by MassiveDump 3 years ago
MassiveDump
queengPeriodicPatriotTied
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Total points awarded:30 
Reasons for voting decision: Pro dropped two thirds of Con's contentions, making this an easy decision.
Vote Placed by Input 3 years ago
Input
queengPeriodicPatriotTied
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Total points awarded:30 
Reasons for voting decision: Caveat emptor, caveat subscriptor Latin expressions for "buyer beware" and "seller beware." Pageants for female children based on appearance is creepy and to me, capitalism (business & television coverage) at it's low point. Certain aesthetic values can be taught without giving a preteen make-up. I think viewers and parents could best put their energy towards something more productive - anything more productive. Interesting topic.