The Instigator
dylan160w
Pro (for)
Losing
0 Points
The Contender
SeventhProfessor
Con (against)
Winning
4 Points

Globalization of Pop culture good for the global community?

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Post Voting Period
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after 1 vote the winner is...
SeventhProfessor
Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 11/7/2013 Category: People
Updated: 3 years ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 1,602 times Debate No: 40152
Debate Rounds (4)
Comments (0)
Votes (1)

 

dylan160w

Pro

So by this, I mean the rapid diffusion of pop culture around the world is making cities and towns look more uniform and is altering the native landscape. So what is defined as pop culture and native landscape?

So say in China, a (fictional) city was once based upon local markets and Mom-and-Pop type sores/restaurants to suit the people's needs, but now has been exposed to pop culture, meaning more popular places like 7-11, McDonald's, and Walmart's are popping up instead of the things they had before. Can this be a good thing (Pro) or a bad thing to a city/country's overall personality (Con)?

Rules:
1. First round is just for acceptance and other pre-comments only.
2. Use credited sources when possible.
3. Try to keep it a clean and fair arguement.
4. May the better argument win!
SeventhProfessor

Con

I accept.
Debate Round No. 1
dylan160w

Pro

So I am a believer that it is good for the world to become more similar in the way that we do business. Corporations such as 7-11, McDonald's and Walmart are both common, but not the only, examples of pop culture chains and more of them worldwide makes for a more home-style feeling for each individual country. What I mean by this is, say an American family is going on vacation for the holidays to China. They are more than likely going to be unfamiliar with the local landscape of China and feel uncomfortable when shopping or even going on the main streets. And Vice Versa.

So the establishment of worldwide chains (resulting from the diffusion of pop culture) would make worldwide travel and shopping a lot easier for non-native visitors. Also, not to mention this opens many doors for the global economy, by establishing more big name chains across the globe can impact a countries sales positively by more familiar customers of the establishment will most likely buy what they normally do back home. This also works Vice Versa, where a familiar shopper of the chain back at home will make shopping easier some place else. And on the other side, these worldwide stores can make for great sales for the corporation and encourage them to open more worldwide as well as sell/make better products.

But most importantly, it adds the chance for native citizens to also become familiarized with the rest of the world and make people more supportive of globalization.
SeventhProfessor

Con

"Corporations such as 7-11, McDonald's and Walmart are both common, but not the only, examples of pop culture chains and more of them worldwide makes for a more home-style feeling for each individual country."

We should globalize to feel at home when in other countries? If so, isn't it hypocritical if we don't start getting a lot more restaurants and corporations from other countries into ours?While I see that you stated the Chinese family should feel at home in America, the only restaurants and corporations that they would be familiar with are the ones they don't like, such as 7-11, McDonald's, and Walmart.

"So the establishment of worldwide chains (resulting from the diffusion of pop culture) would make worldwide travel and shopping a lot easier for non-native visitors."

It may make it easier, but how many people do you know that would spend eight hours on a plane to go from the US to a copy of the US? The only people that go to a country to have a similar experience as to their time in their own country are people going there for things such as competitions, accepting awards, etc. The majority of people on vacation wouldn't want to see incredibly similar things, even if it makes the travel easier.

"Also, not to mention this opens many doors for the global economy, by establishing more big name chains across the globe can impact a countries sales positively by more familiar customers of the establishment will most likely buy what they normally do back home."

But if all of the companies are centered in places like America, Britain, and Japan, this results in most certainly plenty of money for the smaller countries, but it leaves the countries already on top with the most money, almost guaranteeing they'll stay there for a very long time.

"But most importantly, it adds the chance for native citizens to also become familiarized with the rest of the world and make people more supportive of globalization."

It allows citizens to become more familiar with the Western world, but those in first world countries will most likely never learn of their culture. As we've seen in France, people seeing globalization in work doesn't always make them want to support it.
Debate Round No. 2
dylan160w

Pro

I don't want my examples to be only limited to those, since those are predominately western. But that doesn't mean that the Western world is the ONLY source of globalization.

"While I see that you stated the Chinese family should feel at home in America, the only restaurants and corporations that they would be familiar with are the ones they don't like, such as 7-11, McDonald's, and Walmart."

This supports the idea I was trying to get across me first sentence. People in China will feel more comfortable in America because places like China, Vietnam, France, are also globalizing. For example, In America, there are Chinatowns, Little Vietnams, and many Western European-style shopping districts (in my hometown, Park Avenue is a road with many little shop, resembling French Architecture). And the people that do visit another country, or even migrate to most importantly, are highly likely going to visit these districts mainly due to the fact that they feel lore comfortable with communication when they are in a new place, and to occasionally shop for there basic needs. But that doesn't mean they are only limited to stay in their district, it's just kind of like "home base". Without Globalization, construction of these districts would not occur. And like I said, these are important not only for non-natives, but also for the natives to see what other cultures are like and embrace diversity within their town.

"It may make it easier, but how many people do you know that would spend eight hours on a plane to go from the US to a copy of the US?"

For vacation I went to Guadalajara, Mexico and Lake Chapala and while in Guadalajara, I noticed that there were a lot of Americans there as well as certain distinct American stores (one of which coincidentally being a McDonald's). While I really enjoyed visiting the lake, local marts, and eating at local restaurant, I occasionally found myself ordering a quarter Pounder like I did every now and again back at home. Not to mention the large amount of Americans there made communication and direction asking a ton easier. Now that was just my experience and I can only assume that somebody else from a different country going to another country would be a similar outcome.

"But if all of the companies are centered in places like America, Britain, and Japan, this results in most certainly plenty of money for the smaller countries, but it leaves the countries already on top with the most money, almost guaranteeing they'll stay there for a very long time."

Most MDC's (More developed countries), have their own distinctive chain, Korea Samsung, America McDonalds, China practically everything, Japan Toyota, Shell UK & Netherland, etc. We are now seeing smaller countries starting to make a larger name for themselves, and this is to help by enhancements in technology which increase trade and communication efficiency. We are now starting to see more foreign cars around the world except your usual Toyota, Mercedes , Honda, etc. Also, countries are starting to broadcast other countries' shows, such as Downton Abbey in America and Breaking Bad in China. So isn't globalization helping some of these countries get their stuff out there? Making their products successful worldwide makes everyone go up in terms of revenue.
SeventhProfessor

Con

"This supports the idea I was trying to get across me first sentence. People in China will feel more comfortable in America because places like China, Vietnam, France, are also globalizing. For example, In America, there are Chinatowns, Little Vietnams, and many Western European-style shopping districts (in my hometown, Park Avenue is a road with many little shop, resembling French Architecture)."

The Chinatowns and Little Vietnams, however, are very different from China and Vietnam. While McDonald's (sorry for using it again, it's just the best example of globalization I know of) does change its menus for different areas, such as serving lobster in Canada and removing beef from Indian stores, the central ideas remain the same. Almost the exact opposite is true for foreign restaurants in America. The food stays more or less the same, yet it is all quickly and poorly cooked, giving the store a very different feeling to it. You also argue that Chinatowns and Little Vietnams are an equivalent to the type of globalization the US is promoting, while this is clearly not true. Tiny sections made for groups of people vacationing is not the same thing as having companies from your country everywhere in another. They may feel more comfortable in these places, but certainly not as comfortable as Americans anywhere in France, China, or even Thailand.

"For vacation I went to Guadalajara, Mexico and Lake Chapala and while in Guadalajara, I noticed that there were a lot of Americans there as well as certain distinct American stores (one of which coincidentally being a McDonald's). While I really enjoyed visiting the lake, local marts, and eating at local restaurant, I occasionally found myself ordering a quarter Pounder like I did every now and again back at home."

Of course people will want food from home occasionally, but seeing the stores everywhere could get rather annoying, both for tourists and natives. While a possible solution to this would be to make small "Americatowns" within large cities, I couldn't see many Americans going for this option. I do know of many people that have done this in Japan, but that was as a permanent home, not just for vacationing.

"So isn't globalization helping some of these countries get their stuff out there? Making their products successful worldwide makes everyone go up in terms of revenue."

This is quite true, everyone is making plenty of money this way, but it's the MDC's, such as South Korea, America, China, Japan, and the UK, who make the most money out of this. I'm sure the LDC's (Less developed countries) are making more than enough to be happy with their situation, but these corporations taking over the country is limiting their opportunities to form their own large businesses and become powerful countries themselves.
Debate Round No. 3
dylan160w

Pro

dylan160w forfeited this round.
SeventhProfessor

Con

That's unfortunate. Thanks for a fun debate!
Debate Round No. 4
No comments have been posted on this debate.
1 votes has been placed for this debate.
Vote Placed by tylergraham95 3 years ago
tylergraham95
dylan160wSeventhProfessorTied
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Total points awarded:04 
Reasons for voting decision: Conduct immediately goes to Con for pros forfeiture. Neither side cited any sources to substantiate their positions making it difficult to grant args to anyone. Args go to Con as his points against the appeal of globalization were equal to Pros argument for, but Cons point on the harm to LDC Economies is what tipped the scales for him.