The Instigator
Letzmakethewordbetter
Con (against)
Tied
0 Points
The Contender
UnonymousVoice
Pro (for)
Tied
0 Points

Has the society become more addicted to talking to people behind the screen more than real life?

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Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 2/25/2016 Category: Technology
Updated: 11 months ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 289 times Debate No: 87223
Debate Rounds (3)
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Letzmakethewordbetter

Con

People now days are so addicted to social medias and texting that they don't even realize who is sitting right next to them. There is so many dangers to talking online, but yet no body thinks about them. What has are society become? Is it a good or bad thing? Is this really the kind of society we want our kids living in?
UnonymousVoice

Pro

Our society has been changing every day for the last 200 plus years, and tomorrow is no different. Some Steve Jobs is up and coming right now and we do not even see him/her coming. Let's face it, the future is already here when it comes to communication. Anyone of us can dial up a relative in any part of the world right now and relay a message. Wow, have we come a long way. When we say a society is addicted to something, we must put it into context of what exactly we are addicted too. Is it the smartphone in general? Is it social media? Is it the selfie? Really though, is it a bad thing?

When I travel on the subway, the train, the bus, whatever it may be, it seems as if 80% are glued to their devices. As I sit there, although I prefer to stand, I wonder about what it would be like if nobody had a smartphone. Maybe that deafening sound of the railcar grinding on the tracks would go away with a conversation across the aisle. Or perhaps a new friendship would change the world like Jobs and Wozniak. Even a new baby could come from just a simple smile, if people were that observant. As I continue to sit there I believe that I may be one of the observant ones, the one that breaks away from this new social norm that has emerged in our society.

As someone who has grown up in this culture, by now I am quite used to it, but I vaguely remember a time without smartphones. We didn't have phones to tell each other to come down to the park and play ball, or a tweet that designated a time to meet. But we just went, expecting other kids to be there and play. But today I view my cousins as a casualty to this new social norm. They're so fixated on social media, ever connected video games, and their next Instagram selfie, they've forgotten how to be a kid. Perhaps, they never even knew how to be one. It's a sad reality in our world, but it's one we sacrifice for being the most connected generation in the world's history.

Really, the question being asked here is dull, it's worthless and aged to say the least, especially concerning "dangers talking online." Something we should be asking is whether or not the implications of our generations usage of social media and smartphones will affect long term development and societal growth. Many millennials think the world will hand everything to them, and this is a real issue. Long term, how will this affect how they view themselves, or how they raise their children, or how they will maintain jobs in the workforce. It's one thing to vote for Sanders, but it's another to work for something and earn something legitimately. Doesn't it feel better when you've worked towards something and it pays off? That's how it should be and there is a clear disconnect.

To answer your vague question of whether it's bad or not is with another question. Should we sacrifice our ability to connect freely for the sake of... well I don't even know. Why would we want to? Is it to spark conversations on trains? Force kids to talk to strangers(the ones they're already talking to online) instead of texting and communicating with the ones they know? Take kids away from the entire knowledge base of the planet(the internet)? If the younger generation wants to talk to strangers freely on a bus or a train, they will, believe me I do it all the time. And now instead of randomly going down to park to see if anyone is there, a twitter account has been created, even in our 20's to connect us on when and where to meet for a game of football. There is absolutely no reason for us to restrict usage of phones at any age because this will only hurt our longterm growth and innovation as a society.

Although the examples I have provided guides you to believe I perhaps discourage the usage of cell phones, it's just the contrary. We can now connect to anyone, anywhere, and asking whether it's "bad or good" is not a real question. Kids today are so tech savvy they can do anything and it will prompt them to search more, to learn more, and to take matters into their own hands. Millennials have what they need to succeed, but it's up to them to change the world, one tweet at a time.
Debate Round No. 1
Letzmakethewordbetter

Con

Letzmakethewordbetter forfeited this round.
UnonymousVoice

Pro

UnonymousVoice forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 2
Letzmakethewordbetter

Con

Letzmakethewordbetter forfeited this round.
UnonymousVoice

Pro

UnonymousVoice forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 3
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