The Instigator
TheBreadBasket
Con (against)
Winning
4 Points
The Contender
PoliticalPA
Pro (for)
Losing
3 Points

High School Drug Testing. Is it good?

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Post Voting Period
The voting period for this debate has ended.
after 1 vote the winner is...
TheBreadBasket
Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 5/28/2015 Category: Health
Updated: 1 year ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 645 times Debate No: 75874
Debate Rounds (5)
Comments (0)
Votes (1)

 

TheBreadBasket

Con

Drug Testing should not be allowed in schools. It causes discomfort, is expensive, and has chances for mistakes. I will start up more heated when someone accepts...
PoliticalPA

Pro

The discomfort of the student should not take priority over the safety of all students. Drug attics are unstable and need to be kept out of schools and we should support any means of this including simple drug tests. It harms nobody. If you have nothing to hide then you shouldn't be uncomfortable.
Debate Round No. 1
TheBreadBasket

Con

Drug tests are about 40-51 dollars per individual test. A yearly cost of around 10,000 to 1,000,000 a year. While they might be "effective" they are very costy. At pleasent middle school in ohio, they had wasted about 1 million dollars, and had only got three positives. In a place with some people known to be druggards, you would have gotten more positives. And talking about your recently posted, uncomfortabillity does not matter for their saftey, there are chances for a False-Positive or a False-Negative. The chance of a non druggard to get accused, and a druggard to not get accused. According to WebMD, there is a 5-10% chance of someone getting a False-Positive, and a 10-15% of someone getting a False-Negative. That is too big of a costly zone to ensure that everyone is getting "the safest and most secure saftey they possibly can." Just not worth it, espesially with that wide of an error zone.
PoliticalPA

Pro

I will formally attack your ideology.
"Drug tests are about 40-51 dollars per individual test. A yearly cost of around 10,000 to 1,000,000 a year. While they might be "effective" they are very costly." So wait you disagree you would rather not spend money at let drugs run their course through your school? Last I checked $50 was less then the life of a student.

"At pleasent middle school in ohio, they had wasted about 1 million dollars, and had only got three positives. In a place with some people known to be druggards, you would have gotten more positives." Three positives is not a waste! That's 3 lives that could be rehabilitated. According to huffingtonpost.com the average amount a parent will spend on high school sports for their student is $671 but you don't think they can afford $50 to save a students life?

."According to WebMD, there is a 5-10% chance of someone getting a False-Positive, and a 10-15% of someone getting a False-Negative. That is too big of a costly zone to ensure that everyone is getting "the safest and most secure saftey they possibly can." Just not worth it, espesially with that wide of an error zone"

Just because there is a chance that the test will be wrong doesn't mean we shouldn't try. You are fighting for the drug dealers! you try make it seem expensive but honestly $50 is nothing to save a life. Simply giving parents the options to test their child is a good thing we could save lives! You are so afraid of 15% that you ignore the 85% accuracy! It is not a wide error zone! You would rather let someone ruin their life then spend $50.
Debate Round No. 2
TheBreadBasket

Con

"You would rather let someone ruin their life then spend $50" - You seem to ignore the fact that high schools do not pay for drug testing, it is the parents. The New Jersey State Interscholastic Athletic Association drug tests 500 students athletes at a cost of $100,000 each year, according to a "New York Times" report. For high school students who are already addicted, showing society that they tested positve is not an incentive to stop. You also say that drug testing would "save lives". It seems as if you claim that those who are tested positive, didn't know that they used drugs!

The negative side is not an advocate for the use of drugs, but we also do not believe in high hopes that the execution of such a policy will curb student drug use as you seem to beleive. I mean let"s face reality " in an era where resources are scare and time is of the essence, a drug testing policy is the least of problems that schools should be worrying about. In 2003, PA ruled that unless schools had sufficient proof of students who used drugs, it was unconstitutional to test them. As a matter of fact, the national court does not reccomend testing all students within a high school, and PA set a limit at 27%. Can we really assume that drug testing in schools is the silver bullet for the prevention of youth substance abuse? No we cannot.

Fact of the matter is that even though each year thousands of students try illicit drugs for the first time, only a small number of them become addicted users. And once someone is addicted, it becomes very difficult to stop. The National academy of sciences found that adolescents used drugs at virtually identical rates as schools that drug tested verses schools that did not. Additionally, alcohol by nature is harder to appear in most drug tests because it does not remain in the blood long enough, yet there is are more adolescent alcoholics than there are adolescent drug addicts. About 50 percent of 12th graders say that they've used any illicit drug at least once in their lifetime, and over 35 percent report using marijuana in the last year. A high school student is old enough to determine right from wrong, and when he/she chooses to consume drugs, that student has made a conscious decison to do so. The most a high school can do to after a student has tested positive is give disciplinary actions. They cannot force a student to stop using the drug.

Research generally agrees that drug testing is ineffective because it fails to deter student drug use and should never be considered as a stand " alone approach to a drug problem. However, research does show that schools who find it an obligation to solve a substance abuse problem, should enforce a positive school climate. A study published in 2013 found that perceived school climate was associated with reduced likelihood of marijuana and cigarette initiation and cigarette escalation, and that student drug testing was not associated with improved drug use outcomes. Rather, the engagement of students in after school programs and providing counseling are more effective ways to refrain adolescents from drugs.

Not to mention that one ground-breaking study, conducted by the University of Michigan in 2003, found that schools with drug-testing policies had slightly higher rates of student drug use.
PoliticalPA

Pro

PoliticalPA forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 3
TheBreadBasket

Con

TheBreadBasket forfeited this round.
PoliticalPA

Pro

PoliticalPA forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 4
TheBreadBasket

Con

I assume pro will not comment anymore...
Vote con!
PoliticalPA

Pro

PoliticalPA forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 5
No comments have been posted on this debate.
1 votes has been placed for this debate.
Vote Placed by ThatChristianGuy 1 year ago
ThatChristianGuy
TheBreadBasketPoliticalPATied
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Used the most reliable sources:Vote Checkmark--2 points
Total points awarded:43 
Reasons for voting decision: Gave Con reliable sources due to Pro forfeiting the last few rounds. I still think the reasoning falls with Pro, though.