The Instigator
Crusher8813
Pro (for)
Tied
0 Points
The Contender
EvanBerrett
Con (against)
Tied
0 Points

Hockey is Tougher Then Baseball

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Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 6/25/2013 Category: Sports
Updated: 3 years ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 759 times Debate No: 35068
Debate Rounds (5)
Comments (0)
Votes (1)

 

Crusher8813

Pro

Ian Laperriere, Philadelphia Flyers:
During the first period of a game versus the Buffalo Sabres, Laperriere stopped a wicked slap shot with his mouth and lost seven teeth in the process. An injury this gruesome should require at least a few weeks eating through a straw and drooling all over yourself. Not for a hockey player. Laperriere sat out the second period while he received 100 stitches. He then returned to the ice for the third period and didn't miss a game all season.

Meanwhile, in Baseball ...
In 2004 Sammy Sosa spent 15 days on the disabled list with back spasms caused by sneezing too hard.

Clint Malarchuk, Buffalo Sabres
One of the most gruesome injuries ever sustained in professional sports was back in 1989 when Sabres goaltender Clint Malarchuk was struck in the throat by another skate. The skate blade sliced open his interior carotid artery and a scene from a Horror movie played out before the fans eyes. Malarchuk rose on his own power and skated toward the nearest door off the ice.

It's odd to say that Malarchuk had luck on his side, but he did. The closest door led to the on-site emergency room where the medical staff was able to stabilize the bleeding enough for transport to a local hospital. Three hundred stitches later the wound was closed and Malarchuk was saved.

A mere four days later Malarchuk was back on the ice for practice, and a week after that he started in goal against the Quebec Nordiques.

Paul Kariya, Anaheim Mighty Ducks
During game six of the 2003 Stanley Cup playoffs, New Jersey Devils defenseman Scott Stevens lined up Kariya in the open ice and leveled the Ducks captain and star player. Kariya was knocked out cold and lay motionless on the ice. After several seconds Kariya regained consciousness and teammates helped him off the ice and into the locker room.

It was assumed that Kariya would be out for the remainder of the series, but just 11 minutes later Kariya skated back out onto the ice. Not only did he return to play, he also scored a goal to lead the Ducks to victory and force a game seven.

Meanwhile, in Baseball ...
Braves outfielder Terry Harper separated his shoulder while waving a teammate home and subsequently high-fiving him. There is no excuse for this, unless the teammate rounding third was Brock Lesnar.

Jeremy Roenick, Phoenix Coyotes:
Roenick was once one of the scrappiest players in the NHL and he had his share of enemies around the league. One of those enemies was 6'5" 240 lbs Dallas Stars defenseman Darian Hatcher. Hatcher lined up Roenick behind the net one game and gave the winger a crushing elbow to the face and head that broke his jaw in multiple places. Hatcher was immediately ejected. Roenick paused, skated to the bench, spit out some blood and stuck his fingers into his mouth to adjust the shattered remnants of his jaw. He took his next shift.

Meanwhile, in Baseball ...
During a post-game interview, Marlins outfielder Chris Coghlan tore the meniscus in his left knee while smashing a shaving cream pie into the face of teammate Wes Helms. Coghlan missed six weeks after surgery.

Maurice Richard, Montreal Canadiens In game seven of the Stanley Cup semifinals between the Canadiens and the Boston Bruins, Richard was upended and landed on the ice head-first. These were the days before helmets, and Richard lay motionless surrounded by a growing pool of blood. After regaining consciousness he was helped off the ice by teammates and into the locker room.

To the surprise of everyone in the arena, Richard came back to the bench in the third period with a bandage on his forehead and a sweater still soaked in his own blood. He bounded onto the ice, blood still tricking down his face, and took the puck coast-to-coast through the entire Bruins team to score the winning goal. Many still refer to it as "the greatest goal in the history of the game".

Meanwhile, in Baseball ...
Enigmatic Giants third baseman Chris Brown once asked out of the lineup because of a strained eyelid that made it difficult to blink. When asked the cause of his injury, he informed the skipper that "he slept on it wrong."

Mario Lemieux, Pittsburgh Penguins
While on pace to break Wayne Gretzky's single season scoring record, the Penguins superstar announced that he had been diagnosed with Hodgkin's Lymphoma and would have to undergo radiation treatment for at least two months. Lemieux's life and career were both threatened.

On the last day of his radiation treatment, Lemieux left a Pittsburgh hospital headed for the airport and flew directly to Philadelphia for a game THAT NIGHT. In his first game back he scored a goal and an assist and even got a standing ovation from the Philadelphia fans; fans who are best known for their accuracy throwing batteries at the opposition, not giving applause.

Despite missing two months of action, Lemieux captured the scoring title with 160 points on the year. To put that in perspective, Daniel Sedin led the league in 2011 with 106 points.

Meanwhile, in Baseball ...
Cincinnati Reds Pitcher Steve Foster injured his shoulder knocking over milk bottles during a segment with Jay Leno on "The Tonight Show".
EvanBerrett

Con

I thank Pro for this debate and wish the best of luck.

I'll keep my opening arguments fairly brief and to the point. Pro cited a number of stories in which Hockey players were seemingly suffering much more critical injuries than baseball players. I would like to respond to those stories and then share my own thoughts on the topic at hand.

Regarding the Stories

I hope that the reader will disregard the stories shared. These stories are obviously tailored to the argument since no actual devastating baseball stories were shared. The examples provided were setup perfectly to match the pro argument and are significantly biased. Nowhere did I see some of the more significant injuries in baseball to date including line drives to the head, broken bones, many many pulled muscles, and so on.

To counter the injury stories provided, I would like to point out that national and world statistics counter your claim. Consider the three following sources:

Most child Injuries:
http://www.lpch.org...

Most Dangerous Sports:
http://www.totalprosports.com...

Most Dangerous in America (Ice Hockey didn't even make the list):
http://www.livescience.com...

The statistics shown indicate that there are WAY more injuries in baseball than in ice hockey. Indeed, even in children the numbers are substantially different with Baseball blowing way Hockey.

Counter Argument

It would seem that Pro considers the word "Tougher" as a synonym to more hazardous or dangerous. I believe I have effectively proven that tougher in that regard is false. But as one more point to that, it must be shared that baseball is not just about contact injuries, but career long degredation injuries where arms wear out, for example. Many pitchers have seriously injured their arms and ruined their career after inadequate care for their arms. The closest Hockey finds is concussions.

Additionally, I would consider "Tougher" as a measure of difficulty in the sport. This is tough to compare because there are special circumstances to each. Both require a measure of strategy, both require coordination in their own ways, and so forth. But here is what I see. Hockey requires only skating skills and the ability to pass and shoot a puck. Everything else is strategy (besides the goalie). Baseball on the other hand requires hitting ability (which takes years of practice to get just right, and even then most are still quite poor at it), various throwing abilities (especially for a pitcher who needs to learn tricks such as curve balls and change ups), catching in quick-response and calculated long fly ball catching, and so forth. Hitting the ball alone is extremely difficult, especially at professional level. Hockey on the other hand has the puck freely sent too and fro with more chance than skill to get the goalie in an awkward enough position to be beaten.

I look forward to this debate. And don't get me wrong, I love Hockey. I lived in Canada for 2 years and have watched a number of games.
Debate Round No. 1
Crusher8813

Pro

Crusher8813 forfeited this round.
EvanBerrett

Con

EvanBerrett forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 2
Crusher8813

Pro

Crusher8813 forfeited this round.
EvanBerrett

Con

EvanBerrett forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 3
Crusher8813

Pro

Crusher8813 forfeited this round.
EvanBerrett

Con

So I guess I win?
Debate Round No. 4
Crusher8813

Pro

Crusher8813 forfeited this round.
EvanBerrett

Con

EvanBerrett forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 5
No comments have been posted on this debate.
1 votes has been placed for this debate.
Vote Placed by Ragnar 3 years ago
Ragnar
Crusher8813EvanBerrettTied
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Total points awarded:00 
Reasons for voting decision: No con, you missed 3 rounds... There is no standard by which this was not a fail debate.