The Instigator
ach88
Pro (for)
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The Contender
clgaram720
Con (against)
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Home-Based Education vs. US Public Education

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Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 5/11/2014 Category: Education
Updated: 2 years ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 616 times Debate No: 54428
Debate Rounds (5)
Comments (3)
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ach88

Pro

I've decided that one day when I have children, I will home school them. I'm not necessarily saying that all home schooled children are better off than all publicly schooled children, but I think in most cases, for all or some of the reasons given below, or even additional ones, home schooling does trump public schooling. If someone can convince me that public education is better on every point I've made, or better on more important points that I didn't make, then I'll be happy to send them to public school. Thanks in advance for anyone who chooses to debate with me.

1. I know my children's strengths and weaknesses better than any teacher.
2. I have much less limited resources per child to devote towards educational expenditures than any school.
3. I have much higher motivation to use my resources to further advance the education of my child than any school.
4. I can more effectively discipline my child than any teacher.
5. My metric of success isn't an academic achievement test taken when a child is eighteen, but rather whether my child becomes a fully self-sustaining adult, at whatever age that may be.
6. My metric of achievement doesn't degrade over time.
7. I believe public school to be unsafe for my child.
8. I believe it makes my family stronger.
9. I believe it makes me a more altruistic and well-rounded adult.
10. Public schools weren't even established for the benefit of children's education, but rather as a means of cultural homogenization which is no longer required.

1. I know my children's strengths and weaknesses better than any teacher.

As a mother who has raised my child from birth, I have knowledge, and often greater knowledge than even the child, of the manner in which my child thinks, their natural talents, their natural weaknesses, their motivations, and their repulsions. I read books that uniquely pertain to the thinking patterns of my children individually, and I have lots of time around the child to try out different methods and chisel out the most individualized approach.

2. I have much less limited resources per child to devote towards educational expenditures than any school.

I will not choose to reproduce until I have the financial resources to do so, and when I do, I will be able to splurge on my children's education. Instead of giving my child a book to read about American history, I can go to Washington DC with them. Instead of teaching my children how the Industrial Revolution completely changed American culture, I can take them to a farm where they learn how to pick their own cotton and milk a cow so they can see how long and tedious life was before the cotton gin and modern farming equipment. In nearly every area, I don't have to teach my child out of a book, but by real, physical example.

3. I have much higher motivation to use my resources to further advance the education of my child than any school.

As much as a teacher may care about my child, the importance my child has in the teacher's life still comes second to my own. Not only do I have greater resources to spend on my child, but a greater willingness.

4. I can more effectively discipline my child than any teacher.

A common complaint among public school teachers is their feeling of inability to garner a child's respect. As a mother, I'm fully aware of the extent of a child's infraction and exactly what a child would find the most reprehensible consequence. A school teacher doesn't have the authority to prohibit a child from a birthday party, suspend them from a video game they particularly like, or any other myriad of consequences that uniquely pertain to my child that only I know and I only can deal out.

5. My metric of success isn't an academic achievement test taken every year until a child is eighteen, but rather whether my child becomes a fully self-sustaining adult, at whatever age that may be.

While I will engage in achievement tests to ensure that my child isn't lacking in comparison to his or her public-based peers, this isn't the end-all measure of my success as an educator like it is for a public school. My ability to contribute meaningfully to my society and independently support my general state of health and happiness as an adult is all I care about as an adult, and is the reason to have an education. Unlike in public school, where an educator is successful when the child reaches a certain age and percentile on a test, I will consider my job as an educator done when my child is a happy, healthy, self-sustaining adult.

6. My metric of achievement doesn't degrade over time.

The first time I realized I wanted to home school my children was when I went to college and discovered to my horror that a public US K-12 education isn't enough to prepare American high school graduates for a degree in electrical engineering and mathematics. Suddenly, when I was competing with classmates who were largely from better-educated countries, it became clear to me that the state of our math, science, and technology education lacks far behind the rest of the developed world. I swore I'd teach my children math and science so they could truly major in whatever they chose, and be successful from the outset. As I've researched more, I've realized that I could give them a better education than a public school in every field of study, not just STEM subjects. And further bolstering my conviction, many home schooled children do perform better in universities than do their publicly-educated peers.

7. I believe public school to be unsafe for my child.

While I believe that I can't, and shouldn't, protect my child from all that is evil in the world, or ideas I vehemently disagree with, I don't see public school as a carefully-controlled enough environment to protect children in the event of a child's miscalculation. I feel it's absolutely necessary for my children to realize that danger is lurking, and how to not be naive, but this must be taught in a way that doesn't leave children so exposed to harm for making a wrong choice. In schools, children are exposed to drugs, guns, bullies, STDs, kidnappers, peer pressure-induced eating disorders and aggressive driving, and sexual predators, all at an extremely impressionable and wayward age. Hormones, addiction, loneliness, the need to be seen as independent, and lack of self-esteem all go along with being a teenager, but they can be acted out with low-impact behaviors rather than those that can severely damage if not kill them.

8. I believe it makes my family stronger.

In the event of a wayward decision made by my child, say the decision to take drugs, I'm closer to my child and better able to detect subtle changes in thought patterns and behavior patterns before the damage has gotten completely out of control. Also, as many home schooled children have remarked, home schooling makes children much more close-knit with their siblings and much more likely to lean on their brothers and sisters for emotional support through hard times than they would if they were publicly schooled. With any luck, my errant child will lean on siblings with similar values to my own and my husband's rather than leaning on others for support who may be drug dealers or acting out themselves. This will in turn make the entire family stronger and more likely to depend on each other for support in the future.

9. I believe it makes me a more altruistic and well-rounded adult.

The rearing of children isn't an easy task. It requires a great deal of self-sacrifice, empathy, and patience. These are all things that I know I could use more of!

10. Public schools weren't even established for the benefit of children's education, but rather as a means of cultural homogenization which is no longer required.

When public school was established, most school-aged children didn't speak the language of the Constitution, but rather German, and had values that reflected Germany more than what was actually written in the Constitution. This was cited as a main reason to grant free, English-based education access to all children. The crux of the argument centers around the idea that in order to develop a homogenous, patriotic citizenry, they must be exposed to similar values. I speak the language of the Constitution and am well-versed in American culture and traditions, so this reason for my children to attend a public school does not apply to me. The only values being taught in K-12 schools that I wouldn't also teach are liberally-biased interpretations of our codes of law. While my children will likely be more conservative than their peers as a result, I don't consider this to be detrimental to their sense of pride in their country.
clgaram720

Con

1.There is a benefit to having an outside perspective that you would be losing. If your child gets stuck on a particular subject, you will speak to what you know of them. Perhaps your child has always been persistent, so your inclination will be to nurture that and let him power through it, so to say. An outsider might see what you do not because they don"t know your child as well. You see an issue of persistence, they might see that he isn"t getting it because they need it explained differently. A stranger might clear up a question in five minutes by rewording it, where you might have spent hours encouraging your child"s more natural tendency to get through it via persistence. Teachers provide substantial benefit in that they change frequently, so your child learns many different methods of looking at the same subject which will benefit them in years to come when they have to answer to more than one style of management or type of relationship.
2.One can always plan for the future, but accidents happen, people lose jobs, economies crumble. If you become financially incapable of continuing home schooling or if you have to put your child in public school as a result of calamity, they will have an adjustment to make that may be traumatic. You can"t be prepared for every possibility. And while public school cannot match your monetary or time resources, you can never match them for one very precious resource, which is experience in dealing with DIFFERENT people. No matter how much time you allocate for interaction with others, those will people of your choosing, vetted by you. Your child never deals with people you don"t approve of and is denied the experience of what they will come across in adulthood, which is diversity. Diversity is rewarding. If your child never met a black person until they were 18, how could they be expected not to treat them awkwardly? The same goes for meeting that kid with the dreadlocks and all the tattoos you would never allow in their life during home school.
3.You will always put your child first is a thing all mothers tell themselves. But at a certain point two factors interrupt this desire. Money and time will be the first, unless you are so wealthy that you only have to pay others to do everything else, and your husband doesn"t care about being second. The second factor is self-preservation. You will find a day on which you have become exhausted of school work, or a subject you hate, you will fail your child at some point on some subject because you are human. It can be worse, if you find a subject or assignment that has created a personal problem between your child and yourself. As a mother, you would put your relationship first and get past it as soon as possible, even at the expense of your child"s learning, because of course preservation of the relationship matters more.
4.I reject the premise that a teacher is incapable of rendering consequences. They may not be as abhorrent to your child, but that doesn"t mean they are ineffective. Further, as a home school mom you will have an extremely fine line to walk making sure you punish poor results or behaviors in ways that NEVER make your child insecure in your love. You might never know what education method has made them question this until the damage is already done. Teachers provide enormous benefit in this area because we recover from the loss of their acceptance, but never from the loss of acceptance of our mothers.
5. To create a well-rounded adult, we require social interaction, and the lesson that sometimes we have to do things we hate in order to achieve a goal that may not seem significant to us. With home schooling, you have to find other ways to socialize your child with children their own age and adults that aren"t you. If your child has no exposure to people they disagree with and don"t get along with, they can never be a well-rounded adult. And in spite of the recognition your child might get from you for being well rounded, they still have to take that test at 18 and be judged by its results.
6. Your child, no matter how much effort you put into their education, isn"t you. They may never be great at math or science, no matter how well you teach it. And the reality of the "education is better in other countries" is that it"s a partial fallacy. What was better in your college peers is cultural, not educational. An American child that is exposed to any of our culture is going to develop the idea that weekends mean rest. A Japanese child grows up in an environment where people work six days a week, all day long, with no periods of relaxation. The Japanese kid is going to get your kid"s job because he is the one that stays 12 hours a day Monday through Friday and comes in again on Saturday, not because his education was better. He is accustomed to a culture that says work comes before all else and is to be highly respected. A child brought up here is going to get different ideas. Unless you plan on completely isolating your child from the world, they will be affected by these ideas. At least if you send them to public school they will have the opportunity to meet and experience peers who are lazier than them or have a better work ethic than they do. Without these other people, your child will have no picture of the population, of their competition, by which to judge themselves.
7.There are two problems with this argument. If you can afford to home school at the level you"re suggesting, you can afford to move to an area with safe public schools. Not all schools are dangerous, so you can solve this problem very simply by moving to where they are safest. That doesn"t mean your child will never experience a violence or trauma at school, but we"re never 100% safe anywhere. Second, if you never let your child be exposed to the darkness, they will never learn to recognize light. People are exposed to "drugs, guns, bullies" etc in all life. Keeping your child in a box isn"t going to protect her from these things, it"s going to handicap her when she meets them face to face. If you"ve never met a hot stove, when you finally do meet one, you"re gonna burn your hand. You"ll notice this around 8-10 months when your child can crawl. You can warn them it"s hot repeatedly, but eventually they"re gonna touch it and learn the hard way. All lessons needn"t be learned the hard way, but some important ones must. Never being exposed to someone who mistreats when you don"t deserve it as a child means she won"t know how to handle it when her boss does it as an adult. Letting children learn by trial and error, and learn from mistakes instead of successes is to minimize the damage. If your child learns the hard way not to offend an authority figure while they are 12, the damage is minimal and fades with time. If they don"t have the opportunity to fail at this as a child, they"ll do it as an adult when the ramifications are incredibly more severe. Going to public school is practice for all the situations a child will encounter as an adult, but without irreparable consequences. You cannot offer all of these at home.
8.Strong Family isn"t begot of how a child learns math. The strength of a family is measured in love and acceptance. A working mother who spends 60 hours a week away from home can have a better relationship with her son than a stay at home mom who homeschools her daughter. It"s unrelated. If you are concerned for the time spent away from home now, you won"t be when you hit the toddler years. A strong family is something you fall back on, count on when the outside world hurts you. Just as an infant crawls away to explore and then crawls back to mommy to "check-in" before venturing further away, a public school child goes away to school, gains experiences, then comes home to use your wisdom to help her understand those experiences. Home schooling will give your child different experiences, maybe more, maybe less, but it will never make you a better mirror for those experiences.
9.In order to be successful at parenting, you cannot have hope or expectation for how it will affect you. When you do, you lose perspective. This doesn"t mean you can"t enjoy all the joys of motherhood, but you can"t go into it with an expectation of how you will be benefited, for when you fail to get the results you expected, you will become resentful. That"s human. At a certain point all mothers hit a wall and stop expecting what we hoped for so we have a chance to enjoy what we have. It usually hits you around month three of no sleep and wondering why your child screams all the time even though you were so well prepared to deal with that. Bottom line is, we all get to this point where we realize to enjoy what we have, we must forget to think about what we would like to have, and that is true of all life, not just motherhood.
10. Public education isn"t today what it once was. The goal of public education today is to educate your child. Just like your goal as a mother will be to benefit your child, you will both occasionally fail. It doesn"t always but that alone is an important lesson for a child to learn. Mom isn"t perfect. If mom fails, it"s okay for me to fail, it doesn"t decrease my worth. Institutions/teachers/friends/role models fail. If they can fail and I can survive it and still flourish without them, I will be okay overall.
The decision to home school, like so many important decisions, must be one of experience. You do not yet have the experience necessary with your own child to decide whether home schooling is effective for them. I submit that until you have your own child and see what kind of person they make of you, because they will change you deeply, then you cannot know that you will be an effective homeschooler.
Debate Round No. 1
ach88

Pro

ach88 forfeited this round.
clgaram720

Con

clgaram720 forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 2
ach88

Pro

ach88 forfeited this round.
clgaram720

Con

clgaram720 forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 3
ach88

Pro

ach88 forfeited this round.
clgaram720

Con

clgaram720 forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 4
ach88

Pro

ach88 forfeited this round.
clgaram720

Con

clgaram720 forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 5
3 comments have been posted on this debate. Showing 1 through 3 records.
Posted by clgaram720 3 years ago
clgaram720
I take it from the non response of my competitor that we are finished here. For the record, I am actually all for homeschooling. I am even considering homeschooling my son. I just wanted to play devil's advocate on this issue before made my own decision so I would be making a truly informed one.
Posted by CoolPeppers12 3 years ago
CoolPeppers12
Homeschooling is good. If the parents teach and or do it right, which most do.

Public school can be good do. Depends on the school itself, not on a WHOLE
Posted by Mhykiel 3 years ago
Mhykiel
I have children and I can not believe how often I have had to further their education at home. The public Education system is bigger problem than it was when I went to school. I feel bad for the teachers and administrators who have to do the best they can in such a broken system.

Book reports have turned into Slideshows of 5 points on each slide, of 5 slides. Erroneous information has been told to my children. My children are smart and are held back more by the unchallenging curriculum. I am very much in despair for the future of our children and I see a rise in depression, lower ability to learn new things, and the overall setting up for failure of our youth. I have had to work with new recruits and younger generation on many occasions.

Kids these days are head strong, don't listen, lack important skills, and have a very flawed idea of reality. I'm just glad I can be there to augment my children "education", but if I could I would 100% home school my children.
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