The Instigator
Pro-lifeConservative
Pro (for)
Tied
0 Points
The Contender
Robotoforgoto4
Con (against)
Tied
0 Points

Homeschooling

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Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 3/5/2015 Category: Education
Updated: 1 year ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 480 times Debate No: 71163
Debate Rounds (3)
Comments (1)
Votes (0)

 

Pro-lifeConservative

Pro

Homeschooling is an effective method for parents to censor what their children are learning and teach them what they wish to teach them. It also could help students with disabilities that the parent could respond to better than a school official could. More reasons are to come if you would accept the debate. Use whatever credible sources you would like. I take pleasure in debating with you.
Robotoforgoto4

Con

Home schooling is giving children a false picture of the world for their early development years. They will only be experiencing their parent's teachings. With going to a public/private school, you learn social skills, make friends, and go outside of the "norm". When you simply stay at home, you do not attain these skills. With disabled students, they will be getting care/attention from people who are specialized in this area. Home schooling is also a lot of work for the parents. If we don't allow home schooling, parents will have more time to save orphans or fight world hunger (you get the point). Curriculum can be somewhat monitored if you choose to go to a private school too.
Debate Round No. 1
Pro-lifeConservative

Pro

Unlike yourself, I am actually taking this debate seriously.

Many people who home school, my cousins, for example, go to co-op programs in which they interact with other home-schooled students in a safe, fun environment. These co-op classes are not run by the parents of the child, so they experience teaching beyond what their parents teach them. Also, most districts give home/cyber schooled children the ability to participate in extra-curricular activities in that district. My one friend, who is cyber-schooled, is in the school musical with me because she is in the district, and our district allows these kinds of interactions. Many home schooled children also experience more field trips than regular kids, because the need for funds for the many kids does not exist, and ends up just like a family trip to the zoo, lets say, except with stricter attention to the educational part of it. Next, many parents have the special touch with their disabled/handicapped child that another somebody might not have. The parent would know what makes, say, an autistic child very upset or very glad, while a school employee would not for a while. Also, consistency is often needed with these types of children, and constant parental intervention makes this consistency possible, as oppose to the weekends, snow days, substitutes children experience at a "real" school. Yes, many parents find home schooling difficult and draining at first, but soon find the many joys in it, so much that they resent sending their children to public/private school in the first place! [1] Contrary to what you say, parents have to teach certain topics, administer certain exams, and such depending on the district that they are in. For example, in Pennsylvania, the Keystone exams are required for graduation. If a student, home schooled or not, does not complete these tests, they cannot graduate.
The Home School Legal Defense Association, advocates for home schooling, have performed extensive research on the topic and find home schooling to be helpful. [2] They say, "Homeschool freedom works. Homeschoolers have earned the right to be left alone," because of their research. Another source, raisesmartkid.com, [3] also gives benefits of home schooling.

[1] http://www.scholastic.com...
[2] http://www.hslda.org...
[3] http://www.raisesmartkid.com...
Robotoforgoto4

Con

Really, you made me read all of that??? By the way I am taking this seriously (ish). Humor is needed to make this debate tolerable.

The co-op classes are not everyday. This means that they are only being exposed to a difference maybe 4 times a month or less. In public/private school, they are receiving all of these things DAILY. You then brought up about how the homeschoolers have the opportunity to do activities in the district. This is not always so good though. For one, most of the kids in the district participating are already friends and see each other everyday. It may be harder for the homeschooler to fit in/make friends.

While more possibilities for the homeschooler may be present at the schooling age than the public going child, in the long term, they find themselves a bit behind. Through schools, kids learn about college and can more easily attain info. about colleges.

Consistency can also be seen through a constant professionally trained caring individual at the school. They will remain with the disabled student for many years. In a school, specialized for kids with disabilities or not, can get these kids better acquainted to the "real" world and help them improve their life skills. They can make more friends like them who are experiencing the same things they are.

Parents have to teach certain topics that are the same that public/private schools have to teach. They all have to take the same tests. Good you made that all clear. So why then give an untrained figure the hand in training you for the test. A teacher at a school has been trained to deal with these tests and will help the student perform best.

*I left out the humor this time. I hope you are satisfied.
Debate Round No. 2
Pro-lifeConservative

Pro

I feel insulted, as I find this debate most enjoyable.
Yes, the co-op classes are not everyday, but they still offer valuable time with other home-schoolers over extended periods of time, for say, 30 weeks. A co-op, just to clarify, as icanteachmychild.com [1] puts it, "As with any organized group, structure and rules vary from group to group. In general, however, homeschool co-ops are groups of homeschooling families who join together to enrich their homeschooling experience by learning from and with one another. Often these groups will participate in field trips, sports, classes, etc. There are often mom"s night out activities and retreats to encourage and refresh us moms in the midst of our busy lives." Parents give rave reviews of co-ops, too! "Personally, I think that joining a homeschool co-op is just one of many ways to enrich your family"s homeschool experience. There is so much we can learn from one another!"[1] Next, many of the home-schooled students are involved in other activities outside of school, such as community baseball teams, in which they meet other students. Many people in my church are home schooled, but people in my school know them from both church and sports. As a result, everyone knows them very well. So, no, home schooled students do not always have more trouble finding friends than public/privately schooled students do.
Many students in public school, such as myself, know how annoying it is to not be able to switch periods without hearing the f-bomb or hearing about the sex one had over the weekend. Those home schooled do not have to experience these terrible words and conversations, unless it is commonplace at home, in which case they are most likely used to it. But many are not in favor of these harsh words, and get very irritated by these words.
I disagree with you when you say that home schoolers may find themselves behind. Many home schooled children may experience more than quality education. Dr. Donald Ericksen of UCLA says, "Some of the worst teachers I"ve ever seen are highly certified. Look at our public schools. They"re full of certified teachers. What kind of magic is that accomplishing? But I can take you to the best teachers I"ve ever seen, and most of them are uncertified.... We don"t have evidence at all that what we do in schools of education makes much difference in teacher competence."[2] Clearly, if a doctor declares most home schooling parents better teachers than those certified, we have a problem in our schools. Many disabled children may never experience the "real" world, as they may live with their parents or in a care-giving facility for the rest of their lives. Lastly, most states require that standardized tests must be administered in other locations. One of my cyber-schooled friends had to go to the state capitol to take a major, standardized test. Thank you for debating.

[1] http://www.icanteachmychild.com...
[2] http://www.hslda.org....
Robotoforgoto4

Con

Alright here are my final thoughts:

Some co-ops cost money. Public schooling is free and a daily thing. Would you rather spend money for single day per week to do an activity or have open activities at school every day for free? The answer is clear there. I would much rather have daily interaction with other students and participate in daily activities for free at a public school rather than paying money to spend time with some kids every once in a while. Both options are virtually the same except one meets more often than the other and it will be for free. Also not every home-schooled student will know other children. They might not be as involved beforehand making it more difficult for them to make friends.

If you want to protect your child a little bit more, private school is a good option.

You can't just simply live your whole life avoiding things that other people do/say that are offensive to you. You are going to eventually come face to face with some people who live their lives differently than you and who do these things. By going to a public school, you are preparing your child for the "real" world. In this "real" world you will be exposed to new things that you may not like, but because you have learned how to handle these things by growing up in a public school, the change will come easier. A home-schooled child on the other hand may have lived their life more sheltered. When they experience things like that, it may be harder for them to adjust. Parents can't keep their children safe forever so why not slowly ease them into the world by going to school away from home?

I know from growing up going to a public school that there are just some things that are best taught at school. Both of my parents are both highly educated, yet I know that I acquired more academic knowledge through my teachers. There were plenty of things that I learned in school that are helping me in life that my parents could never have taught me. Parents should be teaching us the life skill's lessons and teacher should be teaching us the academic/information used to make us intelligent human beings. Giving parent's both responsibilities is very tough where as giving the responsibilities to the people that they were meant for will be easier for all.

Even though disabled people might not experience the same "real" world that you and I experience, they will grow up in a different "real" world. They will have to face new things. Some might want to improve their life. By growing up in an environment specialized to teach the life skills with others and themselves, they will be better prepared for the "real" world that they will see. They can even go to a school specialized for kids like them if they want.

I don't really understand the last point you brought up, but if you were talking about parent's cheating at home, I never said anything on that. I would hope that the parent's would have the decency not to do such a thing.

It was good debating with you too.
Debate Round No. 3
1 comment has been posted on this debate.
Posted by 4God 1 year ago
4God
Since I don't have enough completed debates I am not allowed to vote. Since I am homeschooled I have to agree with Pro-lifeConservative. Most studies actually show that homechoolers are more advanced. Teachers take up a lot of time explaining. When you're homeschooled you can move ahead or get more help in a subject that you are struggling in, which you can't do in school. Plus if you have a different view point on something you can't prevent getting a bad grade from the teacher because you refused to do something that goes against your beliefs. By the way, homeschoolers can take electives in their school districts and can do part time homeschooling, which allows them to increase their social skills. Being homeschooled does not prevent you from doing the same things that public schooled kids do.
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