The Instigator
ZeldaMafia
Pro (for)
Tied
0 Points
The Contender
Ockham
Con (against)
Tied
0 Points

Homework given to students' by teachers is a waste of time.

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Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 5/20/2016 Category: Education
Updated: 11 months ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 487 times Debate No: 91586
Debate Rounds (5)
Comments (2)
Votes (0)

 

ZeldaMafia

Pro

Self explanatory topic.

No specific rules for arguments, except that the last round has to be a conclusion round (no new points).

The first round is acceptance round.

Best of luck!
Ockham

Con

I accept, I will be arguing that homework is valuable.
Debate Round No. 1
ZeldaMafia

Pro

Let me begin by defining all the terms

Homework: Schoolwork that a pupil is required to do at home.
Students: A student or pupil is a learner, or someone who attends an educational institution.
Teachers: A teacher or educator is a person who provides education for students.
Waste of time: The devotion of time to a useless activity.

Now that we have got a firm idea of what the motion is, let me bring up my first point.

1) Homework has little educational worth and adds nothing to the time spent in school. Some schools and some countries don't bother with homework at all, and their results do not seem to suffer from it. Studies show that homework adds nothing to standardized test scores for primary/ elementary pupils. I mean, homework at least the ones given today include nothing additional to the knowledge imparted by teachers. It is just a "revision" of something already taught. While I'm not against the idea of a fair revision, it is also important to note that not all students have equal capabilities. Homework unfairly judges students on the basis of how much they have understood on a topic they might not understand.

Students should be allowed to revise and study subjects on their own. This helps students to identify what interests them the most and what they enjoy.

A 2007 Metlife study found that 45 percent of students in grades three to 12 spend more than an hour a night doing homework, including the six percent of students who report spending more than three hours a night on their homework.
http://www.theatlantic.com...

Homework does not ensure that students practice what they are taught at school. Teachers often give pupils the end of the exercise they were doing in class to complete at home, it tends to be the harder questions towards the end of the exercise and if a teacher or a tutor is not present to explain or help then it causes the pupil to doubt their ability. To praise what a student has been taught requires the presence of a teacher or tutor who can guide the student if they get something wrong

2) I believe that homework takes up a lot of time . Being young is not just about doing school work every night. It should also about being physically active, exploring the environment through play, doing creative things like music and art, and playing a part in the community. It is also important for young people to build bonds with others, especially family and friends, but homework often squeezes the time available for all these things. A lot of homework may also negatively affect a student with stress and exhaustion. Homework also, in a way works to break down family relations.
https://news.stanford.edu...
The sad thing is, teachers assume that homework takes very less amounts of time to do.

3) Lastly, there isn"t a shred of evidence to support the widely accepted assumption that homework yields nonacademic benefits for students of any age. The idea that homework teaches good work habits or develops positive character traits (such as self-discipline and independence) could be described as an urban myth except for the fact that it"s taken seriously in suburban and rural areas, too.

In short, regardless of one"s criteria, there is no reason to think that most students would be at any sort of disadvantage if homework were sharply reduced or even eliminated. Nevertheless, the overwhelming majority of American schools " elementary and secondary, public and private " continue to require their students to work a second shift by bringing academic assignments home. Not only is this requirement accepted uncritically, but the amount of homework is growing, particularly in the early grades. A large, long-term national survey found that the proportion of six- to-eight-year-old children who reported having homework on a given day had climbed from 34 percent in 1981 to 58 percent in 1997 " and the weekly time spent studying at home more than doubled.

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Statistics and related Articles (Sources)

http://www.alfiekohn.org...

http://www.alfiekohn.org...

http://www.huffingtonpost.com...

http://www.familycircle.com...

http://www.healthline.com...
Ockham

Con

Ockham forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 2
ZeldaMafia

Pro

ZeldaMafia forfeited this round.
Ockham

Con

Ockham forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 3
ZeldaMafia

Pro

My opponent has for some reason forfeited this round.
Since I have nothing to say on this matter or counter, I rest my case.
Ockham

Con

I thank my opponent for starting the debate and look forward to a fruitful discussion.

As a computer science major, I have written dozens of computer programs in Java, assembly language, SQL, and a variety of other languages. Most of these programs were written as part of homework assignments given by the instructor. If I had not been assigned these programs, or not written them, I would not have been able to grasp how to program, because there is no way to learn the skill of programming except through repeated practice.

Computer science is not the only discipline like this. No one can learn mathematics, physics, biology, chemistry, or a number of other disciplines without doing an enormous amount of studying on their own, apart from class instruction. This is obvious from even a passing acquaintance with the hard sciences. In addition, it is the expert consensus of the teachers who teach classes in these disciplines, which is why all of them give homework assignments to students taking these classes.

Since homework is necessary to learn the hard sciences, it is clear that the hard sciences are a counterexample to my opponent's claim that homework is unnecessary, so we should negate the resolution.

My opponent has made three arguments against the value of homework:

1. It adds nothing to the time spent in school.
2. It takes up a lot of time that could be spent doing other things.
3. There is no evidence that it yields non-academic benefits.

Let's consider these points one by one.

Point 1 is simply mistaken when it comes to the hard sciences. No one can learn to do physics or chemistry, or learn to program, without sitting down on their own and working through example problems. The only way to achieve comparable benefits without homework would be to spend hours of class time having students quietly work through problems.

Point 2 overlooks the importance of learning concrete practical skills. It is more important to learn algebra than to get good at soccer, or other forms of recreation. Young people should spend some time on recreation, but the main focus should be building up a foundation of knowledge that they can carry into the future.

Point 3, even if true, overlooks the fact that developing good study habits is a virtue in and of itself, regardless of whether it leads to other virtues. Having solid study habits will help students learn the skills to become good at any profession they choose to pursue.

For these reasons, we should negate. Thank you.
Debate Round No. 4
ZeldaMafia

Pro

Firstly, I would like to say that the last round will include rebuttals as this is literally the first counter-round for me. I need to be able to rebutt atleast once.

Secondly, let's look at my opponents intro

"No one can learn mathematics, physics, biology, chemistry, or a number of other disciplines without doing an enormous amount of studying on their own, apart from class instruction. This is obvious from even a passing acquaintance with the hard sciences. In addition, it is the expert consensus of the teachers who teach classes in these disciplines, which is why all of them give homework assignments to students taking these classes. Since homework is necessary to learn the hard sciences, it is clear that the hard sciences are a counterexample to my opponent's claim that homework is unnecessary, so we should negate the resolution." (I haven't quoted the entire paragraph)

From this, all I can conclude is that my opponent is only looking at the pure science majors (Physics, Chem, Math and Bio - PCMB). However, there are fields other than Science that may interest people, even non-academic lines. The point is that not every field requires the same amount of practice and effort. Obviously, for these PCMB fields you need rigorous practice, but say for an athlete, is it going to help him writing down and repeatedly practicing these fields taught at school?
No, because an athlete needs practice on-field. On that note, let me make this clear: I'm not telling schools to remove athletes from schools, what i'm suggesting is that we need to moderate both sides of development. Athletes need more classroom time and studious children need more physical training periods.

What I'm trying to imply is that homework these days focuses only on the academic areas of development. This is biased to non-academic students and should be checked.

Here is what my opponent has stated.

"Point 1 is simply mistaken when it comes to the hard sciences. No one can learn to do physics or chemistry, or learn to program, without sitting down on their own and working through example problems. The only way to achieve comparable benefits without homework would be to spend hours of class time having students quietly work through problems.

Point 2 overlooks the importance of learning concrete practical skills. It is more important to learn algebra than to get good at soccer, or other forms of recreation. Young people should spend some time on recreation, but the main focus should be building up a foundation of knowledge that they can carry into the future.

Point 3, even if true, overlooks the fact that developing good study habits is a virtue in and of itself, regardless of whether it leads to other virtues. Having solid study habits will help students learn the skills to become good at any profession they choose to pursue."

Against point 1, I can say that my opponent is still referring only to pure science majors. I have covered that up earlier.

For point 2, I have to admit I was kinda surprised. My opponent said that "algebra" is better than "soccer". This, I believe is one's personal opinion. No one should judge what is "better" for a student. That discussion should be open to children. Obviously, parents and teachers help a student to choose, but the final decision lies with the student himself/herself. The main focus should be on knowledge? Isn't it already? A footballer has knowledge (and skill) in playing the game, a musician knows what to play and has many mathematical principles in mind.

Bottom line, knowledge is relative. What may be knowledge to one may be useless info to another.

Lastly, the last line in point 3 is a bit overstated. It is not true that studying and rigorously doing homework helps students in all aspects of life.

This is because, the homework at least the ones given today in schools requires no creativity, just by-hearting things taught at school. Children can only improve at something if they really put all efforts in the work. I guess we know what the majority of students think of homework. Don't we?

All being said, thank you.

And, best of luck!
Ockham

Con

Ockham forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 5
2 comments have been posted on this debate. Showing 1 through 2 records.
Posted by ZeldaMafia 1 year ago
ZeldaMafia
Thank you!
Posted by caty44444444 1 year ago
caty44444444
Finally, a good debate topic good luck peeps
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