The Instigator
DAVCACTUS
Pro (for)
Losing
0 Points
The Contender
liam12
Con (against)
Winning
7 Points

Homework should not be banned in school

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Post Voting Period
The voting period for this debate has ended.
after 1 vote the winner is...
liam12
Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 5/13/2014 Category: Education
Updated: 2 years ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 53,288 times Debate No: 54591
Debate Rounds (5)
Comments (1)
Votes (1)

 

DAVCACTUS

Pro

Most students might feel that homework is an extremely tedious and useless task to do but throw me tomatoes and banana peels because I believe otherwise. Homework can help students in a plethora of ways both consciously and unconsciously. First and foremost, students are bound to become more responsible by fulfilling this task. This is because it is a given task to be completed and submitted at a due date. They will learn what they must do and when they must do it. Consequently, their time managing skills will improve. They will learn how to divide their tasks among other extra curricular activities and set aside 'tv' time or 'computer game' time which will be helpful in organization and peace of mind.

Homework is also a productive way to pass time. Most teenagers or students spend their time online playing games or checking notifications on facebook to see the latest comments and likes. Doing something that would enhance their brain (as they are still young) such as math exercises or reviewing problems would be a much better way to spend time than looking at the latest post in the news feed. This leads me to my next point which is that homework increases ones knowledge. There is a reason why the teacher wants the students to review on a subject matter. If they were doing mediocre or possibly horrible at a test, facing and repeating the challenge is a must in order to prevent future mistakes from happening in their tests.

No matter how much one loathes it, I believe homework is a necessary part of a student's life and should not be taken away from his/her duties
liam12

Con

According to the study carried out by University of Virginia researchers - one in which they looked at the transcripts and grades of more than 18,000 Xth grade students - homework doesn't necessarily help children get higher grades.

Science proves that homework doesn't accomplish anything. Why? Because nobody wants to sit at home and study. It is so easy to daydream, get distracted, or choose not to do it. At my old school, I was in a 12 person grade. My entire grade scored in the top 2% of students in the state. We enjoyed school, and not to mention I never had homework, not one day. The problem with education is it doesn't interest students anymore.

You want to get better at something you like, its common sense. You want to know more about things that appeal to you, and homework doesn't really appeal to students. It never has, it is a complete waste of time.

In my opinion, we should start educating our teachers literally "how to make class interesting." Like I said before, I did way better in my old school where class was interesting rather than at my new school where classes are as boring as ****.
Debate Round No. 1
DAVCACTUS

Pro

I personally hate homework but Id have to admit it is better than none at all. The opposing side says that students will have a much better time without it but in fact, it will result to a reverse effect or exacerbate the situation more. I say this because what do most of the students do or most teenagers for that matter do after school? For those few who have clubs and are to the athletic side may go out under the sun and take in vitamin D but that is not the case for the other half (or majority to point out). Most teenagers really just stay home and fidget with their phones and computers. Im trying to say that they still stay and sit at home anyway. And it's not the homework's fault that makes most students couch potatoes.

I would also like to point out that homework comes in different forms. Physical education or biology class can tell you to practice volleyball skills or go outside and observe nature and their process of photosynthesis. I also believe that students can't only do what they want to do. In life and especially in work, they will have to face the things they dont want to do. For example, writing a thesis or doing a project. It will help students in abasing themselves in order for them not to have a self-indulgent mind. Homework can really help a student be more organized and responsible as well as learn life lessons. In addition to the knowledge gained at the end of the day.

liam12

Con

According to a study done by the University of Iowa, only 45% of students actually do their homework. Those who do their homework are now a minority, not a majority. This is especially true in urban areas, according to the study.

Secondly, according to the study in my previous argument, homework doesn't make you smarter. If a minority of students do it, and it doesn't improve your intelligence, what's the point?

And no, homework does not inspire kids to go outside. For the most part, homework is a very indoor thing. After all, according to a new study done by Harvard 93% of students who do their homework use technology to get it done, therefore your argument stating that homework inspires kids to go outside is invalid.
Debate Round No. 2
DAVCACTUS

Pro

I firmly believe in the axiom "Practice makes improvement." Practice and hard work are bound to make improvements if not perfection. The reason why a majority of students (if your research is valid) do not do their homework is because they feel that they do not need to which is a harmful mindset in itself. They see homework as something flexible and therefore have no will or feel the need to do it. This leads me to accentuate that schools should properly reinforce homework and see to it that it be submitted fully and on time. In fact, the argument of the opposing side that majority of the students dont even consider doing the task they are directed to do, only shows that students undermine the authority and dont even consider doing their work when they are expected to do so. I also believe in the statement, "No pain, no gain." The opposing side suggests that we shouldnt do it because it's boring and no one wants to do it which are all precursors of a lazy attitude which is something that students should watch out for.

I would also like to point out that the research in which 93% of students using technology for homework has only proved that students dont spend their time enough outdoors. As Ive mentioned in my previous argument, most teenagers or students spend their time indoors anyway checking to see latest updates on instagram and facebook which are far more unproductive than if students do their task. If they're going to use technology anyway, why not use it for something more productive?

And homework may not dramatically increase one's intelligence. In fact, it may not at all. However, aside from important life lessons such as responsibility, time management, and organization, it is a provisional way to preclude future mistakes from happening. Teachers usually give homework before a test. For example, one was learning the complicated quadratic formula in Math and was a little confused, homework serves as a self-study for the student to practice, improve, and develop their mind.


liam12

Con

Read this article, it has many good points of the cons of homework.

Our schools and children are under the gun as never before. Increasing numbers of students are facing batteries of new standardized tests, and both parents and teachers feel the pressure. Many educators are now turning to an old remedy, ratcheting up the homework required of our children. Over the last decade and half, children as young as nine to eleven have seen a nearly forty percent increase in homework, a trend that is likely to continue. Unfortunately, this remedy may be doing our children more harm than good.

We like to think all of this makes sense: It is well tested and, besides, it is what everyone is doing worldwide. No wonder we lose our markets to Japanese, Chinese, and Korean kids. Their schools are more strict and they study harder.

Yet every element of this familiar equation is questionable. Many foreign school systems aren't obligated to educate the whole population and are teaching only an elite. Furthermore, Japanese schools spend up to 25 percent more per teacher than the US. Research does show us the unequivocal benefits of well thought out professional development programs for teachers, especially for teachers who teach in schools with students from traditions which are culturally and linguistically different from their own. Furthermore, even in countries as workaholic as Japan, the number of hours kids are forced to study is becoming an issue of concern. If there is a lesson from Japan, perhaps it should be that the nose to the grindstone mentality has its limits and that harsh regimens can and ought to be challenged.

But the biggest fallacy of all lies in our near religious confidence that more homework makes better students. If homework were a prescription drug, the FDA would long ago have demanded its recall. Over the years, homework has been subjected to a series of controlled trials. These trials vary considerably in their attempts to control for such confounding variables as the education and financial well being of the parents. Bringing together all such trials into the kind of meta-analysis often attempted with respect to drugs is a difficult task, but it so happens that one respected investigator has done so. Harris Cooper, a close student of the subject, reports that "The conclusions of past reviewers of homework research show extraordinary variability... Even in regard to specific areas of application such as within different subject areas, grades or student ability levels, the reviews often directly contradict one another." Even where a positive correlation is established, it is not clear whether homework makes good, well motivated students or privileged and well motivated students do homework. Cooper's work is unequivocal in its conclusion that no significant gains for homework are established for the elementary school years.

Just as tellingly, virtually no one so far has attempted to ascertain the side effects of homework. What are its effects on families, on children's life long interests in the learning? Our own ethnographic research shows that extensive homework assignments have played a major role in school dropouts. In interviews with high school dropouts as part of a study for the Maine Department of Education, we asked students if there was a moment when they knew they were going to drop out of school. Their tales told the story of incomplete homework, of parent-child conflict exacerbated by homework demands that seem to grow as fast as the time parents have available shrinks.

Schools can and must do a better job, but punishing regimes for the children are not the way to go. A modest amount of independent work, say two hours a day, may well be appropriate for high school students, but let's stop trying to buy school reform on the cheap and at the expense of children and their families. The place for our children to be doing independent work is the setting designed for such work, the schools themselves. Teachers or other adults with appropriate skills and experience should be paid to assist our children in independent projects that would advance their learning. But even high school students shouldn't be forced to labor more than forty hours a week, a standard long ago established for adults. Free time plays a key role in fostering both creativity and emotional development, factors just as basic to long term success as an academic gains. In an era that reputedly values testing but that has done so little to test some of its most basic practices, we believe our approach is worth a serious trial.
Debate Round No. 3
DAVCACTUS

Pro

The con side has presented no arguments but merely posted an article (which does not even serve a convincing case of why homework should be banned) only moderated.

As the con side has only presented an article(with no proper citation might I add) as its claim I will now proceed to show how the evidence does not support the banning of homeworks but actually encourages homework.


1. )The article first mentions, "No wonder we lose our markets to Japanese, Chinese, and Korean kids. Their schools are more strict and they study harder." This only proves that studying does make a difference and self-study falls under studying.

2.)"
Our own ethnographic research shows that extensive homework assignments have played a major role in school dropouts." Though the article says there is a positive correlation between extensive homework assignments and the number of dropouts, I would like to point out that this argument is solely about the existence of homework and not the amount given to the students. It clearly states extensive homework and not moderate. The final evidence,

3
.)"A modest amount of independent work, say two hours a day, may well be appropriate for high school students," only shows that the article supports the system of homework.

In conclusion, the article wasnt about the pros of banning homework but only the cons of too much homework. This makes the argument of the opposition invalid.



liam12

Con

Ok my friend, I want to point out a few invalid arguments that you posted. First of all you claim that homework keeps kids out of trouble. I bet not. Cite your source.

Secondly, besides homework do you really think all teenagers do is go on Facebook, get into trouble, and surf the web? I think B.S. 1 in 3 teens actually have a job, and 1 in 2 teens have a source of income through labor. Funny isn't it? Don't you think that teens could go out and make some money, and do something productive?

Thirdly, this idea that homework gets kids outside is also complete B.S. Homework does not get kids outside at all. For me, homework is really something that traps me inside. The average teen who does their homework does almost 70 minutes of it! Thats a good way to keep yourself locked up.

Next, since so far all of your arguments are invalid, I will continue to point out that homework is not beneficial, as I said before (and you have not yet argued against)

Here is a really good article that pretty much sums up everything:

Add up all the time you spent doing homework. What would you say: a million billion hours? Roughly a trillion bazillion hours doing homework, over the course of your life? Well, as it turns out, it was a complete waste of your time:

Research reveals primary school homework offers no real benefit - and only limited results in junior high school.

Only senior students in Years 11 and 12 benefit from after-school work, associate professor Richard Walker said.

"What the research shows is that, in countries where they spend more time on homework, the achievement results are lower," Dr Walker, from Sydney University's Education Faculty, said.
Okay, but, why does so much homework get assigned? "At the moment homework (is often) an add-on because parents want it," says Dr. Walker. Haha.

Here is the source: http://gawker.com...
Debate Round No. 4
DAVCACTUS

Pro

The reason why teens go to school in the first place is to gain knowledge that they can apply later on in life. That is the whole point of education. The opposition side is implying that ‘something more productive’ is that teens go out and make money which is kind of not the point because they need to go to school to have a lifelong career and a stable job in the future. Therefore, telling them to make money is a completely different and rather useless matter in this argument as we are discussing the well-being of teenagers who go to school. Even if the opposition states that ‘1 in 2 teens have a source of income through labor’ that may only be the case in the American country due to its capitalism form of culture. In other cultures, namely Asian or European, it may be a completely different case.

For the pro’s defense, this side never mentioned that homework keeps kids out of trouble. Kids will make trouble regardless of whether they do their homework or not. If they are trouble-makers then they make trouble and homework has nothing to do with the nature of someone making trouble.

The article that the con has presented clearly says that "Only senior students in Years 11 and 12 benefit from after-school work, associate professor Richard Walker said." which in fact, shows that homework does have an effect. And if it does have an effect on Years 11 and 12, the reason why it may not on the lower levels is because perhaps they are not focused enough and dont commit their time on it because of a lazy attitude. Furthermore, the second article is in contrast to the first article posted by the opposition side. The latter article states that the more homework, the lower achievement results whereas the first article states that countries such as Japan or Korea have more efficient students due to their strict school constantly making them study. The pro's side suggests that the opposition fully understand the given evidence before copying and pasting it as an argument.


As the con’s side demands reference, here is the reference I have chosen to prove that a myriad of teens do spend time on social media.

Social Network Statistics

Data

Total percentage of 18-24 year olds who already use social media

98%

Total amount of minutes people spend on Facebook every month

700 billion

Reference:< N.A. (January 2014). Social Networking Statistics. Statistic Brain. Retrieved from http://www.statisticbrain.com...;

The percentage of teens using social media is near to 98% and these teens spend 700 billion minutes every month. The opposition side mentions that we are wasting our two hour a day sacrifice of doing homework when average teens spend 700 billion minutes in the internet every month. Teenagers are already locked up in their rooms which exonerates the idea of homework fomenting that effect. Talk about a waste of time?

In conclusion, homework does have a positive effect in the lives of many people. This is because homework is a good way of covering what people learn in class and serves as a learning pathway for students. If done well, students learn to feel good about their accomplishments and therefore will only have inspiration to work harder. As increasingly difficult homework gets, students learn perseverance to accomplish more challenging problems. Homework will make a positive effect not only in the knowledge but also the attitude of a proper learning individual.


liam12

Con

I never said or implied that school is not for gaining knowledge. Your arguement is invalid.

Secondly, I presented the solution to education, it needs to appeal to students. Science proves that homework doesn't accomplish anything. Why? Because nobody wants to sit at home and study. It is so easy to daydream, get distracted, or choose not to do it. At my old school, I was in a 12 person grade. My entire grade scored in the top 2% of students in the state. We enjoyed school, and not to mention I never had homework, not one day. The problem with education is it doesn't interest students anymore. You want to get better at something you like, its common sense. You want to know more about things that appeal to you, and homework doesn't really appeal to students. It never has, it is a complete waste of time.

We need to make education more interesting to students, which CAN and HAS been done, especially at my old school.

Thanks for debating with me!
Debate Round No. 5
1 comment has been posted on this debate.
Posted by DAVCACTUS 2 years ago
DAVCACTUS
It was nice debating with you as well. To be honest, I couldnt understand my loss at first as I thought I defended myself thoroughly but after reviewing the arguments, I did notice I was too busy rebutting all your statements that I forgot to strengthen my own. Thank you for the debate and for making me realize another thing to improve.
1 votes has been placed for this debate.
Vote Placed by TheMaster_Debator 2 years ago
TheMaster_Debator
DAVCACTUSliam12Tied
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Total points awarded:07 
Reasons for voting decision: DAVCACTUS failed to find solutions to Liam12's problems. Liam12 proved almost all of DAVCACTUS' arguments invalid, there is an obvious winner.