The Instigator
TheLastMan
Pro (for)
Winning
31 Points
The Contender
1970vu
Con (against)
Losing
3 Points

Homework should not be banned

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Post Voting Period
The voting period for this debate has ended.
after 5 votes the winner is...
TheLastMan
Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 12/16/2013 Category: Education
Updated: 2 years ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 1,915 times Debate No: 42437
Debate Rounds (4)
Comments (2)
Votes (5)

 

TheLastMan

Pro


= = = = =INTRODUCTION= = = = =
Greetings Debate Dot Org (DDO). Greetings ladies and gentlemen; hello to the judges, the audience and my opponent. My name is TheLastMan and I represent the Pro position in this case. As such, it is my job to demonstrate that homework should not be banned.
This debate is about ban on homework. I shall be arguing that homework should not be banned from school. It is not sufficient for my opponent to only refute my arguments, but must also present a case. The burden of proof is shared.
Definitions:
Ordinary dictionary definitions are used for this debate, with context determining the appropriate choice from multiple definitions. Homework: Preparatory school work done outside school (especially at home). Should: Expresses an emotional, practical, or other reason for doing something. Example- You should not kill your mother. Ban: Expel from a community or group.
--I have sufficiently defined the resolution, no semantics please.
= = = = = GUIDELINES = = = = =
Acceptance
This round is for acceptance, clarification of the resolution, and definitions. If my opponent does not agree with my basic interpretation of the resolution, he is to negotiate changes in the comments before accepting. Arguments begin in Round 2.
= = = = = DEBATE FORMAT = = = = =
= = = =
1. First Round is for acceptance
2. Opening Arguments/Rebuttals
3. Rebuttals/Arguments
4. Closing statements/Rebuttals
  • No side can present new arguments in the last round.By accepting, my opponent agrees to abide by all conditions and rules. This is a serious debate, no semantics. No trolling.
1970vu

Con

Okay I accept this debate.
Debate Round No. 1
TheLastMan

Pro

Thank you for accepting the challenge. --Framework--
There is an important background I will try to establish in this debate in order for the resolution to be more easily affirmed and that is the benefits of homework. (x1)A review by researchers at Duke University of more than 60 research studies on homework between 1987 and 2003 showed that, within limits, there is a positive interaction between the amount of homework which is done and student achievement. The research synthesis also indicated that too much homework could be counterproductive. The research supports the '10-minute rule',the widely accepted practice of assigning 10 minutes of homework per day per grade-level. For example, under this system, 1st graders would receive 10 minutes of homework per night, while 5th graders would get 50 minutes' worth, 9th graders 90 minutes of homework, etc.[1] ======================================================================== some more benefits of homework and why homework should not be removed: 1.Homework encourages students to work more independently, as they will have to at college and in their jobs. Everyone needs to discipline responsibility and skills in personal establishment,working to deadlines, being able to research, etc. If students are always ""spoon-fed"" topics at school, they will never develop study skills and self-discipline for the future. A gradual increase in homework responsibilities over the years allows these skills to develop . For instance, to read a novel or complete a research project, there is simply no time at school to do it properly. Students have to perform independently and be willing to read or write, acknowledging that if they struggle, they will have to work through the problem or the difficult words themselves. Diane Ravitch points out that a novel like Jane Eyre cannot be completed if it is not read at home -- students have to work through it themselves . 2.Having homework also permits students to genuinely fix in their heads work they have done in school. Doing tasks linked to recent lessons helps students strengthen their understanding and become more confident in using new knowledge and skills. For younger children this could be practising reading or multiplication tables. For older ones it might be writing up an experiment, revising for a test and reading in preparation for the next topic. Professor Cooper of Duke University, has found that there is evidence that in elementary school students do better on tests when they do short homework assignments related to the test . Students gain confidence from such practise, and that shows when they sit the tests. Education is a partnership between the child, the school and the home . Homework is one of the main ways in which the student""s family can be involved with their learning. Many parents value the chance to see what their child is studying and to support them in it. It has been described as the ""window into the school"" for parents, the area in which schools, parents and students interact daily . And schools need parents"" support in encouraging students to read at home, to help with the practising of tables, and to give them opportunities to research new topics. 4.Homework is a vital and valuable part of education. There are only a few hours in each school day -- not enough time to cover properly all the subjects children need to study. Setting homework extends study beyond school hours, allowing a wider and deeper education. It also makes the best implement of teachers, who can spend lesson time teaching rather than just supervising individual work that could be done at home. Education is about pushing boundaries, and the learning should not stop at the entrance to the classroom -- students should take skills learnt in the classroom and apply them at home. Homework allows this to happen, encouraging students to go above and beyond what they do in school. Reading is the best example, students learn how to read at school, but in order to get better, they need to practise and that is best done at home, with the support of parents and at the right pace for the student.
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My argument |
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Contention 1: Limited amount of well planned homework |
============================= It is true that overload is bad,but that does not advocate for complete removal of homework.
This "over load homework" problem can be cured. Limited portion of finely planned homework should be assigned to students. Very limited amount of homework will not harm the students. It's an option. There are two options to solve the problem. a)Reducing the amount of homework to a well planned schedule homework b)Removing the homework as an activity in school. As I said in my framework (see x1) that how "10 minute" rule benefits students and this limited amount of homework will not become a burden to students. As we can see that option (a) is better than option (b). Because it will not only reduce a lot of burden from students, but also benefit all the students. Homework should not be banned. The resolution is affirmed. source: http://dukenews.duke.edu...
1970vu

Con

America's education system is failing. Finland on the other hand, ranks very high in international rankings. Why is that the case? Even though the United States does more homework, it still fails. Finland has moved away from the homework model. Let us examine the reasons why Finland has moved away from homework.

1. According to world-recognised neurological development academic Dr Michael Nagel, the adult brain did not fully mature until the third decade of life and too much stimulation could cause unnecessary stress.

2. There isn't a shred of evidence to support the folk wisdom that homework provides nonacademic benefits at any age -- for example, that it builds character, promotes self-discipline, or teaches good work habits. We're all familiar with the downside of homework: the frustration and exhaustion, the family conflict, time lost for other activities, and possible diminution of children's interest in learning. But the stubborn belief that all of this must be worth it, that the gain must outweigh the pain, relies on faith rather than evidence.

3. Homework Teaches Bad Work Habits: I know this sounds crazy, because it"s precisely the reason that so many people give for offering homework. However, homework doesn"t teach good study habits. It teaches kids to study, because they have to rather than need to. Similarly, homework doesn"t help children become hard workers, because the work is not self-directed. Want to watch a child work hard and take ownership of learning? Watch a child build a bridge for fun. Let a child read a book for fun (without the bribery of fried dough) and see just how hard a kid will work when there is a meaningful goal. Hard work is a product of motivation. It is an internal drive. When we a parent steps in an makes a child work hard, the work ethic diminishes.

4. It is possible to provides students with meaningful learning experiences after school. However, if that"s the case, why make it mandatory? Why not say, "I offer tutoring if you need help" or "here"s an idea of something you might want to pursue on your own?" When I was in high school, I wrote pages upon pages of poetry, a novel (never even told an adult) and countless short stories. It was, on some level, self-directed homework. And honestly, I would have allowed a teacher that I trusted to provide feedback. However, if the process had been formalized, I would have kept all of that even more underground.

Alternatives:
Emphasize the idea that learning can and will happen naturally at home or elsewhere in a child"s world. Visit a skate park and watch the learning that happens. Spend some time watching kids develop new games in the neighborhood.
If parents really want homework, let teachers give workshops (might be a great time to bridge the gap with homeschoolers / unschoolers by doing a co-teaching workshop) on how to engage children at home in authentic learning.
Provide ideas and support for students who are interested in doing more. If a teacher had said, "Hey, I"d like to meet with you on that novel you"re writing," I would have met one-on-one or in a small writing circle.
Treat homework as an extracurricular activity: Students in my class voluntarily do homework when we create documentaries. They take pictures, film interviews, complete community surveys, work on neighborhood ethnographic studies and volunteer with local charities. The key here is that it is not graded and is treated as an extracurricular activity.
Ultimately, we need to tackle injustice. If parents can"t be home with kids after school, there is a systemic flaw that needs to be addressed socially, culturally and politically.
Debate Round No. 2
TheLastMan

Pro

====>CONTENTIONS<==== My opponent hasn't presented any case against my contention 1 and my argument goes completely unrefuted. ====ATTACK==== ATTACK1------>>"America's education system is failing."<<---------- This claim is unwarranted. Con did not say how America's education system is failing. He did not present any source,statistic or research data to back this claim up. It seems more like an assumption rather than fact. ---->> "Even though the United States does more homework, it still fails."<<------ I shall argue that this claim is also unwarranted. The most important advantage of homework is that it can enhance achievement by extending learning beyond the school day. This characteristic is important because U.S. students spend much less time studying academic content than students in other countries do. A 1994 report: The study found that “students abroad are required to work on demanding subject matter at least twice as long” as are U.S. students (National Education Commission on Time and Learning, 1994, p. 25).
ATTACK2------>>"According to world-recognised neurological development academic Dr Michael Nagel, the adult brain did not fully mature until the third decade of life and too much stimulation could cause unnecessary stress."<<------->>Con did not discuss how this is relevant to homework. Excessive stimulation can be caused by other things too. Fine. Let's assume Con is accusing homework for unnecessary stress. Now, let us analyze this. 1) Too much stimulation causes unnecessary stress. 2) Too much stimulation can be caused by excessive amount of homework. Thus, homework causes unnecessary stress. ---->>>Addressing the issue: If homework is assigned within limits, it will not create excessive stimulation. Thus, unnecessary pressure will not be originated by limited amount of finely scheduled homework. If homework is planned properly by the teacher, it will not cause unnecessary stress. See x1 in my previous round for more information.
ATTACK3 --->> Let's divide this into two parts. (Division1=D1 and Division2=D2). D1: There isn't a shred of evidence to support the folk wisdom that homework provides non academic benefits at any age -- for example, that it builds character, promotes self-discipline, or teaches good work habits.------- D2: We're all familiar with the downside of homework: the frustration and exhaustion, the family conflict, time lost for other activities, and possible diminution of children's interest in learning.------ Reply-1: Con lectures about evidence in D1. He says that there is no evidence to support the folk wisdom that homework provides non academic benefits, but in D2 he follows on by discussing about the downside of homework without submitting any evidence to cover his premises. He merely says that we are all familiar with the downside of homework. Reply to D1: I never said homework builds character or teaches good work habits. However, I do affirm that homework promotes self-discipline. Homework promotes self-discipline because homework encourages students to work more independently. Everyone needs to develop responsibility and skills in personal organization, working to deadlines, being able to research, etc. If students are always “spoon-fed” topics at school they will never develop study skills and self-discipline for the future. A gradual increase in homework responsibilities over the years allows these skills to develop . For instance, to read a novel or complete a research project, there is simply no time at school to do it properly. Students have to act independently and be willing to read or write, knowing that if they struggle, they will have to work through the problem or the difficult words themselves. Diane Ravitch points out that a novel like Jane Eyre cannot be completed if it is not read at home – students have to work through it themselves . -------------------Reply to D2: Con demonstrated some influences of homework on students. I shall evaluate this influences into two divisions. *Point-(1) The frustration and exhaustion, the family conflict, and possible diminution of children's interest in learning.----> Reply: If homework puts students off learning, then it has been badly planned by the teacher. As Linda Darling-Hammond, a professor of Education notes, 'many teachers lack the skills to design homework assignments that help kids learn and don't turn them off to learning'[http://www.washingtonpost.com...] . The best homework tasks engage and stretch students, encouraging them to think for themselves and follow through ideas which interest them. Over time, well planned homework can help students develop good habits, such as reading for pleasure or creative writing. The research however suggests that homework is not in fact putting students off learning. Rather studies in Britain indicate that 'most children are happy (and) most are achieving a higher level than before'.[http://news.bbc.co.uk...] *Point-(2): Time lost for other activities. Reply: Homework has not prevented students doing other activities; it takes very little time to complete. Recent American surveys found that most students in the USA spent no more than an hour a night on homework. That suggests there does not seem to be a terrible problem with the amount being set. Furthermore, British studies have shown that 'more children are engaging in sport or cultural activities' than ever before.[http://news.bbc.co.uk...] As such, there is no clear evidence to suggest that students are stuck at home doing their homework instead of doing other activities. In addition, concerns over how busy children are suggest that parents need to help their children set priorities so that homework does not take a back seat to school work.
ATTACK4------>> "Homework Teaches Bad Work Habits: I know this sounds crazy, because it"s precisely the reason that so many people give for offering homework. However, homework doesn"t teach good study habits. It teaches kids to study, because they have to rather than need to. Similarly, homework doesn"t help children become hard workers, because the work is not self-directed. Want to watch a child work hard and take ownership of learning? Watch a child build a bridge for fun. Let a child read a book for fun (without the bribery of fried dough) and see just how hard a kid will work when there is a meaningful goal. Hard work is a product of motivation."<<--- (1) If homework is not self-directed, it is the responsibility of teachers and parents to motivate the students doing their homework. Teachers should instruct homework in an inspiring approach. They should design homework as a purposeful goal to students. Parents should also assist students to make their homework a product of motivation. Homework should not be accused for not being the product of motivation. This objection does not justify the disallowing of homework as an activity in school. (2)Whether homework puts us off learning will always depend on the assigned homework. Activities that involve no interaction, or are not engaging will discourage learning. But homework could also mean reading an interesting book, having to find something out, create something, or doing a task with family. Homework can be as varied as class work and just as interesting. ======>DEFENCE<=======
Con didn't address many of my arguments, the few he did (indirectly) were addressed in detail.
The resolution is affirmed.
1970vu

Con

I concede and forfeit. I have alot of stuff on my agenda. I simply have no time to debate right now.
Debate Round No. 3
TheLastMan

Pro

Okay. Thanks for the debate. Good luck :)
1970vu

Con

I concede again.
Debate Round No. 4
2 comments have been posted on this debate. Showing 1 through 2 records.
Posted by Logical-Master 2 years ago
Logical-Master
PRO wins sources because even for the source that CON did mention, he didn't provide us with a means of accessing said source. PRO's evidence is verifiable.
Posted by TheLastMan 2 years ago
TheLastMan
I had so many things to say in round 3. I couldn't present my complete rebuttal for the character limit. But, His point four was irrelevant. His point four actually advocates my side. It advocates that homework can stay as an activity in school by treating as an extracurricular activity. This does not justify the removal of homework as an activity in school. Since I was out of space and this contention was irrelevant, I had to skip it.
5 votes have been placed for this debate. Showing 1 through 5 records.
Vote Placed by whiteflame 2 years ago
whiteflame
TheLastMan1970vuTied
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Total points awarded:61 
Reasons for voting decision: Relatively straightforward. The concession wins conduct for Pro, his arguments were better articulated and well-sourced, so he wins on those fronts. He does fall behind on grammar because of organizational issues by comparison, but overall, this is an easy Pro win.
Vote Placed by Logical-Master 2 years ago
Logical-Master
TheLastMan1970vuTied
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Total points awarded:70 
Reasons for voting decision: [Conduct Verdict]: Pro wins here because CON conceded. Polite or not, conceding a debate is bad conduct should be discouraged. [S/G Verdict]: Pro wins here since I feel a forfeit/concession should grant these points automatically. That said, I had a hard time reading PRO's R1 due to the lack of spacing. His four framework points were crunched together. [Convincing Argument Verdict]: PRO wins hands down, not simply due to the concession from CON. CON didn't really do much to address PRO's arguments, but the biggest clincher for me was PRO"s argument that homework was preparation for the real world. PRO is correct that 'independent work' doesn't simply end after highschool, but continues in college and real life. Hence, when CON says "homework teaches people to study because they have to rather than that they need to", I'm unpersuaded since this is EXACTLY how things work in the real life. PRO could have won this debate with this argument alone. [R/S Verdict]: PRO. See comments.
Vote Placed by STALIN 2 years ago
STALIN
TheLastMan1970vuTied
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Total points awarded:70 
Reasons for voting decision: Con conceded.
Vote Placed by williamfoote 2 years ago
williamfoote
TheLastMan1970vuTied
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Total points awarded:60 
Reasons for voting decision: Con forfeited the debate, which left a lot of Pro's points unrefuted.
Vote Placed by birdlandmemories 2 years ago
birdlandmemories
TheLastMan1970vuTied
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Total points awarded:52 
Reasons for voting decision: Pro gets arguments and sources, as his argument in round 3 was not refuted. He also had sources to back up his arguments. Spelling and grammar to con because his arguments were more organized, and he had less mistakes in his argument. Conduction to con on the polite concession.