The Instigator
BobTurner
Pro (for)
Winning
14 Points
The Contender
DeAsante
Con (against)
Losing
0 Points

I would be a better president than you

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Post Voting Period
The voting period for this debate has ended.
after 2 votes the winner is...
BobTurner
Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 3/9/2014 Category: Politics
Updated: 3 years ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 614 times Debate No: 48719
Debate Rounds (3)
Comments (2)
Votes (2)

 

BobTurner

Pro

Rules:
1. Shared burden of proof.
2. Both debaters are running for president, and will try to convince the voters that they will be a better president than the other.
3. The election is set amid the current political landscape.
4. Con will post his opening arguments in Round 1, and from there must post "No round, as agreed upon" in Round 3. If he does not do so, he will forfeit all 7 points to Pro.

Let's begin.
DeAsante

Con

I will be better than you, if i become a president because i will listen to the voice of my people,I will not be selfish thinking that this person did not vote for or he or she is not part of my party so i will not assign a job to him or her and give it to a bifferent person who voted for me and is part of my party knowing perfectly well that he or she can not do the work as expected,but i will rather give it to the one who can do it and do it well.
Debate Round No. 1
BobTurner

Pro

Platform:

1. Eliminate all personal income taxes, corporate income taxes, payroll taxes, estate taxes, and taxes on capital gains, dividends, and interest.
2. Impose tariffs on imports.
3. Legalize all drugs.
4. Tax those drugs.
5. Eliminate all federal regulations.
6. Repeal ObamaCare.
7. Abolish Social Security, Medicare, and Medicaid.
8. Part-time Congress.
9. Abolish the Federal Reserve and bring back the gold standard.
10. Abolish the Departments of Education, Interior, Housing and Urban Development, Interior, Commerce, Energy, and the Environmental Protection Agency.
11. Ban all gay marriages.
12. Ban all abortions.
13. Re-invade Iraq.
14. Invade Pakistan, Syria, Yemen, Ukraine, and the Congo.
15. Stay in Afghanistan.
16. Expand the drone war.
17. Allow states to ban contraception.
18. Allow states to establish religions.
19. Abolish all campaign finance restrictions.
20. Expand oil subsidies.
21. Abolish welfare.
DeAsante

Con

DeAsante forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 2
BobTurner

Pro

I would ask that my opponent adhere to our previously scheduled rule that he post "no round, as agreed upon" in the final round, because I will be unable to respond to his next round arguments -- forfeiting does not afford him the luxury of changing the rules.

He commented in round 1 that he would be a better president than me because he would "listen to the voice of [the] people" and "will not be selfish thinking that this person did not vote for or he or she is not part of my party."

The implication is that I would not listen to the voice of my people, or I would be selfish toward people who didn't vote for me. This is a bare-assertion fallacy. Con can not support this statement, so we must place it in the category of a baseless ad hominem attack.

He also mentions dolling out positions on the basis of votes -- that is, cronyism -- and implies that I would engage in some type of quid pro quo. Again, he has no facts to back this up.

Ultimately, he has not posted any policy positions at all, so I urge voters to vote Pro in the upcoming election.
DeAsante

Con

Great Expectations
Americans expect a lot from their Presidents. Understandably, they
want the President to take quick action on problems facing the nation,
such as crime and drug abuse. However, the U.S. Constitution limits
the President's power to act. Only Congress can pass legislation, and
Congress sometimes moves slowly. The President can only approve or
veto (reject) legislation that Congress passes. Even then, Congress can
override a veto and make it the law. The Supreme Court can also limit
the President's power by ruling that a law or action violates the U.S.
Constitution. "The President has less power than the average voter
thinks he does," says presidential expert Paul Boller. "He can't simply
by himself make major domestic policies."
In dealing with foreign countries, the President has more freedom.
That is because he must react quickly to threats and opportunities
from other countries. Even so, Congress and the courts can limit the
President's actions. Also, the President must get Congress to approve
any big decision, such as declaring war or approving a treaty.
The "Bully Pulpit"
Despite these limitations, Presidents have incredible power. Much of
that power is informal, meaning it is not spelled out anywhere in the
U.S. Constitution or laws. For instance, President Theodore Roosevelt
(in office 1901-1909) said that his office gave him a "bully pulpit" a
powerful platform that lets him draw attention to key issues.
Theodore Roosevelt was an expert at using the bully pulpit to drum up
support for his policies. So was his cousin, President Franklin D.
Roosevelt (1933-1945). Franklin Roosevelt led the U.S. through two of
its greatest crises: the Great Depression of the 1930s and World War
II. His radio addresses, called "fireside chats," drew huge audiences.
Before one speech, Roosevelt asked people to buy maps so that they
could follow his explanation of World War II events. His request
produced a nationwide run on maps, and about 80 percent of
Americans listened to his speech.
Facing Crises
Franklin Roosevelt is considered one of the best Presidents, in part
because he was so good at communicating with the public. What other
skills do you think a President needs? Consider these three crises faced
by past Presidents:
The Louisiana Purchase: In 1803, President Thomas Jefferson
(1801-1809) had an opportunity that came in wrapped in a big
problem. France had offered to sell the U.S. a huge chunk of land
west of the Mississippi River for just $15 million. That was a bargain.
The problem was that the U.S. Constitution gave Jefferson no authority
to make the purchase. But Jefferson went ahead and bought the land,
nearly doubling the size of the U.S. He later admitted that he had
"stretched the Constitution until it cracked." Congress later approved
the purchase.
Risk of Civil War: Abraham Lincoln was elected President in November
1860, but he did not take office until the following March. During that
time, seven Southern states voted to secede (leave) the Union because
they feared that Lincoln would abolish slavery. The new President had
to choose: Should he oppose secession and risk civil war, or should he
let the Southern states secede and see the U.S. break apart? Lincoln
chose to oppose secession. The U.S. Civil War began one month after
he became President.
The Berlin Airlift: After World War II ended in 1945, the German
capital city of Berlin was divided. West Berlin was occupied by troops
from the U.S. and its allies; East Berlin was occupied by troops from
the Soviet Union. The whole city was located in Soviet controlled East
Germany. In June 1948, the Soviets cut off all land routes to West
Berlin, trying to force the Western powers out of the city. U.S.
President Harry S. Truman (1945"1953) could either back down and
lose the respect of his allies, or stand firm and risk starting a war with
the Soviets. Instead, he chose to go around the blockade by sending
supplies by air. Within a year, the Soviets ended the blockade.
Who Is Best Qualified?
How can voters be sure that a candidate will hold up during those
kinds of pressure situations? The short answer is that they can't. Even
so, a candidate's character often gives clues as to how the person will
react under stress. People disagree about what character traits are
most important in a President. But there are some commonly accepted
things that people look for, such as integrity, strength, and caring.
Franklin D. Roosevelt, who grew up near New York's Hudson River,
said that his character was rooted in his childhood. "All that is in me
goes back to the Hudson," he once said. Youthful experiences are also
credited with shaping Bill Clinton and Bob Dole. Experts say that the
misfortune that both faced at a young age helped make them very
determined men.
For instance, 14-year-old Bill Clinton was a star student in Hot
Springs, Arkansas. He seemed to excel at everything he did. Yet his
sunny attitude and good grades masked terrible problems at home. His
stepfather was an alcoholic who abused Clinton's mother. Clinton
testified at their divorce trial that he had tried to stop his stepfather's
violence. In response, he said, the older man "threatened to mash my
face in."
On the other hand, Bob Dole was a shy, athletic boy who grew up
during the Great Depression in a poor neighborhood of Russell,
Kansas. At 18, he joined the U.S. Army to fight in World War II. When
he was 21, Dole was wounded twice. His wounds almost killed him and
they left his right arm useless. "I do try harder," Dole once said. "If I
didn't, I'd be sitting in a rest home, in a rocker, drawing disability
[pay]."
Washington's Struggle
Experts say that adult experiences can be just as important in shaping
a future President. "It's their adult experiences that help them form
their [political] opinions," says presidential expert Joan Hoff. For
instance, during the American Revolution, General George Washington
struggled to keep the Continental Army going. He received little help
from the 13 states, and the Continental Congress had no power to
force the states to pitch in. As a result of that experience, Washington
pushed hard while he was President (1789"1797) to create a central
U.S. government.
Paul Boller says that it sometimes is difficult to compare modern
candidates with the candidates of the past. In the first place,
technological advances such as television allow the press to follow
every move that a modern candidate makes. Second, Boller says,
people's attitudes about both Presidents and candidates often become
more romantic with the passage of time. "George Washington is rightly
considered a model character," Boller says. "[But when he was
President], he had enemies who didn't think he had any [good
qualities] at all."
Passing the Test
How important is character in deciding which candidate to vote for?
Some experts say that voters today worry more about the issues: what
the candidates plan to do about crime, health care, education, and
other problems. From now until next election day, the major
candidates for President will be talking about their plans for dealing
with the major problems facing the country, and will certainly have
different ideas for dealing with issues ranging from violent crime to
the growing use of tobacco by young people. A good president must have certain characteristics; he should be a
born leader and have the courage to stand up and make decisions
without hesitating. A good president should also show bravery in
facing difficult situations, in addition he should be merciful and
wise to make the best decisions in different circumstances.
Debate Round No. 3
2 comments have been posted on this debate. Showing 1 through 2 records.
Posted by Actionsspeak 3 years ago
Actionsspeak
Sorry, I fixed my mistakr please hold no grudge :(
Posted by BobTurner 3 years ago
BobTurner
Actionspeak is illiterate
2 votes have been placed for this debate. Showing 1 through 2 records.
Vote Placed by Actionsspeak 3 years ago
Actionsspeak
BobTurnerDeAsanteTied
Agreed with before the debate:--Vote Checkmark0 points
Agreed with after the debate:--Vote Checkmark0 points
Who had better conduct:Vote Checkmark--1 point
Had better spelling and grammar:Vote Checkmark--1 point
Made more convincing arguments:Vote Checkmark--3 points
Used the most reliable sources:Vote Checkmark--2 points
Total points awarded:70 
Reasons for voting decision: 4. Con will post his opening arguments in Round 1, and from there must post "No round, as agreed upon" in Round 3. If he does not do so, he will forfeit all 7 points to Pro. This rule was ignored and will indeed be taken into account, as shown above.
Vote Placed by JustAnotherGuy 3 years ago
JustAnotherGuy
BobTurnerDeAsanteTied
Agreed with before the debate:--Vote Checkmark0 points
Agreed with after the debate:--Vote Checkmark0 points
Who had better conduct:Vote Checkmark--1 point
Had better spelling and grammar:Vote Checkmark--1 point
Made more convincing arguments:Vote Checkmark--3 points
Used the most reliable sources:Vote Checkmark--2 points
Total points awarded:70 
Reasons for voting decision: Con violated a rule clearly stated in round one of posting no arguments in the final round. The blatant disregard of this rule results in Pro getting all 7 points as stated in the rules.