The Instigator
kailey1212
Con (against)
Tied
0 Points
The Contender
Drewbater
Pro (for)
Tied
0 Points

Increased security at airports is justified

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Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 3/26/2014 Category: Places-Travel
Updated: 2 years ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 652 times Debate No: 49997
Debate Rounds (5)
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kailey1212

Con

I went through a full-body scanner with a braid in and the people patted down my hair because it was "unnatural". This should not happen. Can I also point out that I was only 13 when this happened.
Also, if you do not think that this is important, look what someone said about the TSA:
"TSA is forcing travelers to consent to a virtual strip search or allow an unknown officer to literally place his or her hands in your pants," said John Whit head, president of The Rutherford Institute, a civil liberties organization.
Drewbater

Pro

While some TSA measures might seem extreme, and uncomfortable for the person on the receiving in, I think most can agree that we value human life more than our personal space. Terrorist attacks targeting the transportation industry are very common, and planes are a fairly easy target if you can get on them. A bomb big enough to rip a hole in the plane would de-pressurize the cabin thousands of feet above the ground and cause a plane crash. Most would die and the terrorists mission would be complete. A big example of this were the 9/11 terror attacks.
Ever since 9/11, airport security has been much more tight, to prevent things like this happening again, and this has worked. Recently there have been far less plane attacks. Security must be tight though, because terrorists can be sneaky. There have been reports of bombs in underwear and in shoes, and if people aren't thoroughly examined, hundreds could die in a bombing.
Debate Round No. 1
kailey1212

Con

Yes, but I found research that says that you are more likely to trip on your own vomit then die in a terrorist attack.

Arguing against full-body scanners, civil liberties groups cite the Fourth Amendment, which protects the privacy of your body and your possessions. Specifically, it protects against "unreasonable searches and seizures." But the courts say that the Fourth Amendment protection applies only if a person is in a situation where he or she has a "legitimate expectation of privacy." That means the person expected to have some degree of privacy in what he or she was doing, and society would accept that expectation of privacy as reasonable. For instance, a person using a public restroom would expect to have privacy, and most people would agree that was reasonable. The question the courts may have to address about full-body scanners is whether a passenger at an airport has a legitimate expectation of privacy to be able to invoke Fourth Amendment protection.
Drewbater

Pro

Just because terror attacks are not an everyday incident does not mean that they are to be ignored. Drawing back to terror attacks in general, and not just on planes, we can see a list (see sources) containing a plethora of bombings. Even if only a few thousand people may die a year from this kind of thing (and there are probably more), the families of these people, their close friends, and their community are all distraught and sad. How would you feel if it was your parents or friends in that explosion? This issue is in no way to be ignored or made to seem less terrible than it already is.

You also said that, "Fourth Amendment protection applies only if a person is in a situation where he or she has a "legitimate expectation of privacy." I would agree peoples houses can not be broken into, and bathrooms are off limits, but not an airport. Airports are public facilities with hundreds of people in them at a time. I would in no way expect a legitimate amount of privacy in an area like this, which is also prone to terror attacks. I know people don't like spending time waiting in line, but when peoples lives are at stake I think it is fully justified.

http://en.wikipedia.org...
Debate Round No. 2
kailey1212

Con

kailey1212 forfeited this round.
Drewbater

Pro

Drewbater forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 3
kailey1212

Con

kailey1212 forfeited this round.
Drewbater

Pro

Drewbater forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 4
kailey1212

Con

kailey1212 forfeited this round.
Drewbater

Pro

Drewbater forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 5
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