The Instigator
Lawrence
Pro (for)
Winning
3 Points
The Contender
Achidnagar
Con (against)
Losing
1 Points

Individual thinking and skills should be practised more in primary and high schools

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Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 8/15/2009 Category: Education
Updated: 7 years ago Status: Voting Period
Viewed: 1,269 times Debate No: 9227
Debate Rounds (3)
Comments (6)
Votes (1)

 

Lawrence

Pro

This is my first debate.

Both primary and high schools, in my opinion, often just give pupils information and teach them to think all in the same way rather than teaching and assisting in individual thinking and skills that would help them both in and outside of school. I think that teaching individual thinking and skills in primary and high schools would lead to pupils having more fun and being more confident and happy.

Here are some suggestions on changing teaching methods

1.) Use debating more in classes

2.) Enable more access to events, contacts, and tutors that are somtimes out of school that would help pupils pursue interests and hobbies through regular school sessions and classes.

3.) Allow pupils to go more at they're own pace of working and allow them to gather information and work in a way that they find most convenient, efficient, and fun

4.) If needed, assist and give advice to the pupils in following interests, hobbies, or learning skills in school time

5.) Concentrate on providing equipment sufficient to the needs of the pupils and learning.

6.) Prevent intimidation, or using fear to disipline pupils
Achidnagar

Con

I thank my opponent for this interesting opportunity. As education is very varied worldwide, I think the resolution is too specific to be applied to worldwide education. I therefore assume, based on my opponent's profile, that it applies specifically to the Scottish educational system.

The resolution can only be interpreted and debated meaningfully in light of an agreed-upon purpose for education. As of yet, my opponent has stated little as to the actual purpose of education; it has merely been implied that such a purpose might involve students "having more fun and being more confident and happy". I believe that is far from the purpose of education.

Educate: 1 a : to provide schooling for b : to train by formal instruction and supervised practice especially in a skill, trade, or profession
2 a : to develop mentally, morally, or aesthetically especially by instruction b : to provide with information : inform [1]

From this, one can infer that any change that is positive for an educational system, and thus should be made, will accomplish one of the following:
1. Better prepare students for use of a particuar skill, trade, or profession
2. Better develop students mentally, morally, or aesthetically
3. Provide students with more or better information
In addition, the positive change resulting from an action toward these goals must be obviously greater than any negative changes that also result; there must be a tangible, overall improvement.

I will now respond to my opponent's opening statements.

"Both primary and high schools, in my opinion, often just give pupils information and teach them to think all in the same way rather than teaching and assisting in individual thinking and skills that would help them both in and outside of school. I think that teaching individual thinking and skills in primary and high schools would lead to pupils having more fun and being more confident and happy."

This entire paragraph consists of my opponent's opinions; he readily admits it. They may be valid, but have yet to be demonstrated as such. He must show, firstly, that Scottish schools do indeed just give pupils information and teach them to think all in the same way. He must also show that assisting in individual thinking and skills is significantly preferable for furthering the purposes of education. Fun, confidence, and happiness may be desirable by-products, but they are not education's goals.

My opponent has offered various suggestions regarding how to change the educational system. However, these do not in fact constitute a valid argument for the resolution; they are just a means of implementing it. In order for these teaching methods to support the resolution, my opponent must show firstly that they would demonstrate increased use of individual thinking and skills, and that they would be overall beneficial to schools.

I will respond regarding the content of this issue once my opponent makes a supported, positive case for the resolution. Until then, the resolution stands without affirmation.
Debate Round No. 1
Lawrence

Pro

I would like to thank my opponent for challenging me in this debate. I noticed in the comments page that he said he would have to forfeit the debate, but I will state my second argument anyway.

Firstly, I would like to state that the idea of pupils " having fun and being confident and happy" as I stated in the first round, are not the main goals of education. I would agree with the definition of education's goals that my opponent gave in his first argument. I do, however think that in primary and high schools (I am referring to scottish schools, as education is indeed varied worldwide as my opponent stated in his first argument) the elements of fun, confidence, and happiness should be aimed for in the way of practicing and teaching indiviual thinking and skills. Pupils being interested in what they are learning should also be aimed for. Noam chomsky (American liguist, philosopher,cognitive scientist, political activist, author, and lecturer) stated, for example: "Learning doesn't achieve lasting results when you don't see any point to it. Learning has to come from the inside. You have to want to learn, if you want to learn you'll learn no matter what" the scource for this statement can be found at the link below:

http://www.newfoundations.com...

At Elgin high school (Scotland) I feel work is rushed (in science and Maths, for example) to a pont where I feel I am simply copying things down rather than thinking about the information. Work is often centred around how to answer questions: worksheets with blank spaces for example, which is often used in primary school. various other question papers, often in standard grades, (which are scottish qualifications) are another example. This is my reason for saying that primary and high schools often teach students all to think in the same way, which is perhaps an other-statement, but there are my reasons.

I made suggestios in the first round about how to change/add to the school system:

1.) Use debating more in classes (this would help students to think about many different issues, and would lead them to research scources for thier arguments.)

2.) Enable more access to events, contacts, and tutors that are somtimes out of school that would help pupils pursue interests and hobbies through regular school sessions and classes. (this would enable many different options to the students, making them more motivated and interested, which would help them to achieve more success)

3.) Allow pupils to go more at they're own pace of working and allow them to gather information and work in a way that they find most convenient, efficient, and fun (this would also keep pupils interested and motivated in learning)

4.) If needed, assist and give advice to the pupils in following interests, hobbies, or learning skills in school time

5.) Concentrate on providing equipment sufficient to the needs of the pupils and learning. (this is benificial for learning skills and for demenstrations.)

6.) Prevent intimidation, or using fear to disipline pupils (this would lower students being angry and less motivated, and would make students more confident)

In conclusion, to help achieve the purposes of education individual thinking and skills should be taught and practised
Achidnagar

Con

Achidnagar forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 2
Lawrence

Pro

Lawrence forfeited this round.
Achidnagar

Con

Achidnagar forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 3
6 comments have been posted on this debate. Showing 1 through 6 records.
Posted by Achidnagar 7 years ago
Achidnagar
I'll need to forfeit this debate, as I'll be gone for the next two weeks or so. Very stupid planning on my part. I'd be willing to debate this again any time after August 30th.
Posted by Achidnagar 7 years ago
Achidnagar
The source for my first-round definition was [1] merriam-webster.com.
Posted by Xer 7 years ago
Xer
Nah. Learning Shakespeare and Middle Ages history is way more practical.

Silly rabbit, tricks are for kids.
Posted by USAPitBull63 7 years ago
USAPitBull63
"I think that teaching individual thinking and skills in primary and high schools would lead to pupils having more fun and being more confident and happy."

Are those your goals for education? Fun, confidence, and happiness?
Posted by Yakaspat 7 years ago
Yakaspat
:D yeah
Posted by Rezzealaux 7 years ago
Rezzealaux
obv the gov doesnt think so
1 votes has been placed for this debate.
Vote Placed by Ragnar 3 years ago
Ragnar
LawrenceAchidnagarTied
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Total points awarded:31 
Reasons for voting decision: Concession... was in the comment section, but I'll count it anyway to be nice.